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Tunisian Politicians Threaten to Hold Early Elections

Tunisian Politicians Threaten to Hold Early Elections

Thursday, 9 July, 2020 - 08:00
A man raises his ink-stained finger after casting his vote at a polling station for the municipal election in Tunis, Tunisia, May 6, 2018. REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi/File Photo
Tunis - Mongi Saidani

Several parties in Tunisia have called for holding early parliamentary elections to reshape decision-making and overcome the deep-rooted disputes in the government coalition.


Khalil al-Baroumi, a top Ennahda official, expressed the movement’s dissatisfaction with the government make-up. But responding to Democratic Current MP Samia Abbou's call on Ennahda to withdraw from the cabinet, he said the movement won’t do that out of its conviction to work for Tunisia’s best interest.


Baroumi stressed that it is Ennahda’s right to demand expansion of the ruling coalition in order to strengthen the prime minister and not to weaken him.


Earlier, Abbou said that Ennahda, which only has 54 out of 217 seats in the parliament, can easily withdraw from the ruling coalition.


MP of Democratic Current Hichem Ajbouni said that in case of failure to reach a political consensus in the government, then the solution would be to hold early polls.


Recently, Secretary-General of Tunisia's General Labor Union (UGTT) Noureddine Taboubi said that holding snap elections would be better than the status quo.


Several observers said that Ennahda would not reject new elections.


Abdel-Karim al-Harouni, head of the party's advisory council, affirmed that Ennahda is preparing for early elections in case Tunisian Prime Minister Elyes Fakhfakh insisted on refusing the formation of a national unity government.


Political analyst Jamal al-Arfawi told Asharq Al-Awsat newspaper that several parties represented in parliament reject taking the risk of approving early polls over fears that they would fail to win seats.


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