Houthi Leader Claims 153 Ship Attacks in 7 Months

Houthi footage shows the moment of attacking the sunken Greek ship “M/V Tutor” in the Red Sea (Reuters)
Houthi footage shows the moment of attacking the sunken Greek ship “M/V Tutor” in the Red Sea (Reuters)
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Houthi Leader Claims 153 Ship Attacks in 7 Months

Houthi footage shows the moment of attacking the sunken Greek ship “M/V Tutor” in the Red Sea (Reuters)
Houthi footage shows the moment of attacking the sunken Greek ship “M/V Tutor” in the Red Sea (Reuters)

Abdul-Malik al-Houthi, leader of Yemen’s Iran-aligned Houthi group, has asserted responsibility for targeting 153 ships in a heightened maritime campaign supposedly in solidarity with Palestinians in Gaza.
This escalation coincides with ongoing US-led efforts to protect shipping lanes in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden.
Since November 19, the Houthis have conducted attacks in the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and Indian Ocean, aiming to disrupt Israeli-linked and other vessels, including those from the US and UK.
They recently expanded their operations to the Mediterranean, claiming strikes on Israeli ports in collaboration with Iran-backed Iraqi groups.
The surge in attacks raises concerns about the security of crucial international sea routes, prompting increased measures by the US and its allies to safeguard maritime traffic.
On June 19, American forces announced that they have destroyed two Houthi sites in Yemen following a spate of ship attacks by the Iran-backed group.
“USCENTCOM forces successfully destroyed one ground control station and one command-and-control node,” in a Houthi area of Yemen, the military command announced on X.
CENTCOM also took out two Houthi “uncrewed surface vessels (USV) in the Red Sea” within the last 24 hours.
Houthi Leader Threatens More Attacks, Claims Targeting Ships
Al-Houthi pledged more attacks in his weekly address on Thursday, and boasted about the targeting of 153 ships linked to Israel, the US, and Britain.
He asserted his forces hit the aircraft carrier “Eisenhower” with missiles for the third time in the northern Red Sea.
In the past week, al-Houthi claimed responsibility for 10 attacks using 26 ballistic and unmanned missiles, including one where his fighters boarded the M/V Tutor ship, rigged it with explosives, and detonated it after striking it with a USV.
Western maritime sources confirmed on Wednesday that the Greek M/V Tutor sank in the Red Sea a week after a Houthi attack. This incident follows the sinking of the British ship “Rubymar” due to similar attacks.
Concerns are now focused on the Ukrainian ship M/V Verbena, whose crew abandoned it in the Gulf of Aden after failing to extinguish a fire caused by another Houthi attack earlier this month.
In other developments, the Houthis admitted on Wednesday to airstrikes they described as “American-British,” targeting the Taif area in Al Durayhimi district south of Hodeidah.
They later acknowledged another strike in the Salif district on Thursday, bringing the total airstrikes over the past 10 days to 30, mostly hitting locations in and around Hodeidah.
Since January 12, US and British airstrikes against the Houthis have exceeded 500, resulting in the deaths of 58 individuals and injuries to 86 others, according to Houthi statements.



Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
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Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)

Sudan's Rapid Support Forces agreed with the United Nations on some steps to ease aid delivery in areas under its control, a member of the RSF told Reuters on Thursday.

The Sudanese army has not reached any understandings on aid delivers with the RSF, he added. It is unclear if these steps could be implemented without the army's participation.

Meanwhile, a key supply route into Sudan's Darfur region, deemed at risk of famine by a global monitor, has been cut off due to heavy rains, a World Food Program official told Reuters on Thursday.
The UN agency has described Sudan as the world's biggest hunger crisis, with the western Darfur region most at risk as Sudan's 15-month civil war that has displaced millions and sparked ethnic violence grinds on.
WFP's Country Director Eddie Rowe said thousands of tons of aid are stranded at the Tina crossing on the Chad border, prompting the body to reopen talks with the army-aligned government to open an alternative, all-weather crossing further south called Adre.
"You have these huge rivers. As I speak now, our convoy, which is supposed to move over 2000 metric tons is stranded," he told Reuters from Port Sudan. Asked on the status of the talks that resumed this week, he said: "It's 50/50.”
WFP is now seeking clearances to move a large 70-truck convoy via a little-used, over 1000 kilometer route from Port Sudan to Darfur which Rowe said will involve crossing the battle lines of both the Sudan Armed Forces, the Rapid Support Forces and various militias.
He added that this mostly desert route has worked in the past but outside of the rainy season and that the last journey took weeks and was "fraught with a lot of challenges.”
In a separate interview, Mona Rishmawi, a member of the UN Fact-Finding Mission on Sudan, told Reuters that she had met Darfur refugees in Chad who told her stories of escaping with virtually no water and eating grass along the route. "There's no doubt that people are starving," she said.