Gulf Carriers Hope Boeing Will Handle Delivery of Aircraft Orders

President of Dubai Airports, Supreme President and CEO of Emirates Airlines Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum during his tour of the company’s pavilion at the Arabian Travel Market in Dubai. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
President of Dubai Airports, Supreme President and CEO of Emirates Airlines Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum during his tour of the company’s pavilion at the Arabian Travel Market in Dubai. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
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Gulf Carriers Hope Boeing Will Handle Delivery of Aircraft Orders

President of Dubai Airports, Supreme President and CEO of Emirates Airlines Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum during his tour of the company’s pavilion at the Arabian Travel Market in Dubai. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
President of Dubai Airports, Supreme President and CEO of Emirates Airlines Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum during his tour of the company’s pavilion at the Arabian Travel Market in Dubai. (Asharq Al-Awsat)

President of Dubai Airports, Supreme President and CEO of Emirates Airlines Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum hoped that the new management of US-based Boeing will address delays in aircraft deliveries.

Addressing journalists on the sidelines of the Arabian Travel Market in Dubai, he noted that discussions with Boeing regarding aircraft delivery dates were underway, stressing that the delay is hampering plans, including expansion operations and fleet size.

The statements of the president of Emirates Airlines are consistent with Gulf airlines that are awaiting clear initiatives from the US aviation manufacturing giant to address deliveries.

Gulf airlines account for a large portion of aircraft purchases from the American Boeing. Sources told Asharq Al-Awsat that those had no other options other than Boeing or Airbus, the European company, which is also facing massive purchase orders.

Boeing has recently been exposed to a series of safety-related incidents, including an emergency landing due to mechanical failures.

On Monday, the US Civil Aviation Administration (FAA) announced that it had opened an investigation against Boeing to determine whether the American aircraft manufacturing giant had conducted the required safety inspection for all 787 Dreamliner airplanes.

Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed stressed that Dubai needs a future airport that will serve the increasing growth in the coming years, noting that the new Al Maktoum Airport is in line with the Dubai 33 agenda.

“Dubai International Airport recorded about 87 million passengers in 2023 and is expected to receive more than 90 million passengers in 2024,” he said.

He explained that the transfer of Emirates Airlines to Al Maktoum International Airport will be made in one phase, adding that the airlines will operate from the airport directly upon its opening.

Regarding the geopolitical situation in the region, he noted that the company is making flexible future plans for passenger transport operations to adapt to challenges.



Egypt Says it Cut Foreign Debt by $14 Bln in 5 Months to May

The Central Bank of Egypt's headquarters is seen in downtown Cairo, Egypt March 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
The Central Bank of Egypt's headquarters is seen in downtown Cairo, Egypt March 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
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Egypt Says it Cut Foreign Debt by $14 Bln in 5 Months to May

The Central Bank of Egypt's headquarters is seen in downtown Cairo, Egypt March 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
The Central Bank of Egypt's headquarters is seen in downtown Cairo, Egypt March 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

Egypt reduced its external debt by $14 billion in the five months to end-May, the sharpest such decline in the country's history, a statement released on Monday by Egypt's press center said.
The country's external debt fell to $154 billion as of the end of May from $168 billion at the end of December, according to the statement which quoted an unnamed high-level source at the central bank.
Egypt quadrupled its debt over the last nine years to help among others fund a new capital, build infrastructure and support an overvalued currency.