Al-Jadaan: China Is a Major Partner in Saudi Arabia’s Transformation under Vision 2030

Saudi Finance Minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan and his Chinese counterpart Lan Fo’an meet in Beijing. (Photo taken from X)
Saudi Finance Minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan and his Chinese counterpart Lan Fo’an meet in Beijing. (Photo taken from X)
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Al-Jadaan: China Is a Major Partner in Saudi Arabia’s Transformation under Vision 2030

Saudi Finance Minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan and his Chinese counterpart Lan Fo’an meet in Beijing. (Photo taken from X)
Saudi Finance Minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan and his Chinese counterpart Lan Fo’an meet in Beijing. (Photo taken from X)

Saudi Finance Minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan said China is a partner in the ongoing economic transformation in Saudi Arabia under Vision 2030, pointing to abundant opportunities for growth and cooperation.

Al-Jadaan and his Chinese counterpart Lan Fo’an chaired on Monday the third meeting of the Financial Subcommittee of the Saudi-Chinese High-Level Joint Committee, which was held in Beijing, with the participation of a number of officials from both sides.

The participants discussed many topics, including macroeconomic conditions and policies, in addition to bilateral and multilateral cooperation between the Kingdom and China.

Al-Jadaan stressed that the committee is an important platform to boost cooperation between Riyadh and Beijing, and comes as a continuation of the long and fruitful cooperation between the two countries on financial and economic issues at the bilateral and multilateral levels. He also noted that China has become a major partner for the Kingdom’s economic transformation.

The Saudi minister emphasized the necessity to have a clear framework for macroeconomic policies to promote stability and sustainable growth, and to achieve a balance between fiscal and monetary policies.

He pointed to the enormous potential for innovation and technical cooperation between China and Saudi Arabia and highlighted the need to strengthen partnerships in areas such as artificial intelligence, renewable energy, and smart cities, which he said can drive economic transformation and create new paths for growth and development.

Reforms require discipline, technical depth, and strong governance of the public sector while benefiting from the expertise of the private sector, he went on to say.

The Kingdom seeks, through its presidency of the IMF International Monetary and Financial Affairs Committee, to bolster economic policy coordination and support global recovery, stressed Al-Jadaan.

At the conclusion of the committee’s work, Al-Jadaan emphasized that Saudi-Chinese relations are characterized by friendship, cooperation and mutual support at international forums.



Lebanon Tourism Season Revives Economic Outlook

People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
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Lebanon Tourism Season Revives Economic Outlook

People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)

The surge in visitors to Lebanon during Eid al-Adha and high demand for summer concert bookings are boosting hopes for a revival in tourism.

This sector is crucial for reigniting positive economic growth after about nine months of challenging conditions due to the Gaza war and subsequent border clashes between Hezbollah and Israel in southern Lebanon.

Contrary to earlier fears this month of possible Israeli strikes inside Lebanon, Ali Hamieh, caretaker Minister of Public Works and Transport, reported a daily average of 14,000 arrivals at Beirut’s Rafic Hariri International Airport, with numbers on the rise.

Jean Abboud, President of the Association of Travel and Tourism Agents, confirmed that despite initial concerns, booking rates have bounced back to 90-95% after Israeli threats of a mid-month strike. Most arrivals are Lebanese expatriates and foreign workers.

Before the summer season’s anticipated surge, Lebanon saw a 5.37% decrease in arrivals, with air traffic down by 9.34% and passenger numbers at Beirut International Airport dropping by 6.84% in the first five months of this year, totaling 2.29 million travelers compared to 2.46 million last year.

These declines were linked to the border clashes.

Lebanon’s tourism sector, generating over $5 billion annually in recent years, ranks as the country’s second most vital revenue stream after expatriate remittances, which officially approach $7 billion.

Together, they contribute more than half of Lebanon’s national income, which has dropped sharply from about $55 billion to under $22 billion due to the ongoing financial and currency crises that erupted five years ago.

Despite significant losses during peak tourism seasons like Christmas, Easter, and Eid al-Fitr, a report by Bank Audi indicated that Lebanon’s tourism revenues lost over $1 billion in the first six months of the Gaza conflict, driven by a 24% drop in tourist arrivals.

On average, tourists spend around $3,000 during their stay in Lebanon.