Saudi EXIM Bank Signs Two Cooperation Agreements with Japan's SMBC, MUFG Banks

Saudi EXIM Bank Signs Two Cooperation Agreements with Japan's SMBC, MUFG Banks
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Saudi EXIM Bank Signs Two Cooperation Agreements with Japan's SMBC, MUFG Banks

Saudi EXIM Bank Signs Two Cooperation Agreements with Japan's SMBC, MUFG Banks

Saudi EXIM Bank signed two cooperation agreements with SMBC Business Banking and MUFG Bank, fostering cooperation and creating co-financing opportunities to promote non-oil exports in target markets, the Saudi EXIM Bank revealed in statement. This came on the sidelines of the Saudi-Japan Vision 2030 Business Forum in Tokyo.

According to the statement, the two agreements were signed separately by Eng. Saad bin Abdulaziz Al-Khalab, CEO of Saudi EXIM Bank, along with Mr. Akihiro Fukudom, CEO of SMBC Bank and Hironori Kamizawa, CEO of MUFG Bank.
Commenting on the partnerships, Eng. Saad Al-Khalab stated: "This collaboration with Japanese entities is part of our joint efforts to strengthen economic relations between both countries and achieve the Saudi-Japan Vision 2030. The acceleration of commercial projects between our nations toward broader horizons comes as a result of the strength, advanced economic status, and promising investment opportunities."
During the roundtable meeting, which brought together several ministers from both sides, Eng. Saad Al-Khalab reviewed Saudi EXIM Bank's activities with Japanese financial institutions and commercial companies to enhance economic and trade relations and identify projects of mutual interest, SPA reported.
During the financial sector's roundtable meeting, Al-Khalab emphasized the critical importance of collaborative efforts between all financial institutions and business sectors. This is to ensure the provision of comprehensive, incentivizing credit solutions that can accelerate the pace of trade and mutual and global investment activities.
The Saudi EXIM Bank aims to empower the Kingdom's non-oil national economy in accordance with Vision 2030. The bank is focused on enabling Saudi non-oil exports to expand and penetrate global markets by bridging financing gaps and reducing export risks.



Lebanon Tourism Season Revives Economic Outlook

People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
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Lebanon Tourism Season Revives Economic Outlook

People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)

The surge in visitors to Lebanon during Eid al-Adha and high demand for summer concert bookings are boosting hopes for a revival in tourism.

This sector is crucial for reigniting positive economic growth after about nine months of challenging conditions due to the Gaza war and subsequent border clashes between Hezbollah and Israel in southern Lebanon.

Contrary to earlier fears this month of possible Israeli strikes inside Lebanon, Ali Hamieh, caretaker Minister of Public Works and Transport, reported a daily average of 14,000 arrivals at Beirut’s Rafic Hariri International Airport, with numbers on the rise.

Jean Abboud, President of the Association of Travel and Tourism Agents, confirmed that despite initial concerns, booking rates have bounced back to 90-95% after Israeli threats of a mid-month strike. Most arrivals are Lebanese expatriates and foreign workers.

Before the summer season’s anticipated surge, Lebanon saw a 5.37% decrease in arrivals, with air traffic down by 9.34% and passenger numbers at Beirut International Airport dropping by 6.84% in the first five months of this year, totaling 2.29 million travelers compared to 2.46 million last year.

These declines were linked to the border clashes.

Lebanon’s tourism sector, generating over $5 billion annually in recent years, ranks as the country’s second most vital revenue stream after expatriate remittances, which officially approach $7 billion.

Together, they contribute more than half of Lebanon’s national income, which has dropped sharply from about $55 billion to under $22 billion due to the ongoing financial and currency crises that erupted five years ago.

Despite significant losses during peak tourism seasons like Christmas, Easter, and Eid al-Fitr, a report by Bank Audi indicated that Lebanon’s tourism revenues lost over $1 billion in the first six months of the Gaza conflict, driven by a 24% drop in tourist arrivals.

On average, tourists spend around $3,000 during their stay in Lebanon.