Berlin's Closed Pergamon Museum Maintains International Profile

24 May 2024, Berlin: Façade parts packed for transportation lie on the construction site in the Mschatta Hall in the Pergamon Museum. Photo: Monika Skolimowska/dpa
24 May 2024, Berlin: Façade parts packed for transportation lie on the construction site in the Mschatta Hall in the Pergamon Museum. Photo: Monika Skolimowska/dpa
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Berlin's Closed Pergamon Museum Maintains International Profile

24 May 2024, Berlin: Façade parts packed for transportation lie on the construction site in the Mschatta Hall in the Pergamon Museum. Photo: Monika Skolimowska/dpa
24 May 2024, Berlin: Façade parts packed for transportation lie on the construction site in the Mschatta Hall in the Pergamon Museum. Photo: Monika Skolimowska/dpa

Berlin's world-famous Pergamon Museum, which is closed for several years of renovation work, is seeking to maintain its presence through international collaborations, one of the museum's directors said on Friday during a tour of the construction site.

"We want to remain visible," said Barbara Helwing, director of the Near East Museum. Cooperation with other Berlin museums are already planned.

Discussions were also under way about loans to institutions such as the Louvre in Paris, the Metropolitan Museum in New York, the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the British Museum in London, the German News Agency (dpa) reported.

The Pergamon Museum is one of Germany's most popular museums. As one of the few institutions to combine a collection of classical antiquities, a Near East museum and a museum of Islamic art, it normally attracts more than 1 million visitors annually.

The museum will remain completely closed for at least another three years. Construction phase A, which includes the famous Pergamon Altar, is scheduled to reopen in 2027.

The basic renovation of the south wing is set to begin at the end of this year. This second renovation phase, B, will last until at least 2037. The total costs could amount to €1.5 billion ($1.6 billion).



World Camel Day: Tabuk Camels Symbolize Authenticity and Heritage

Photo by SPA
Photo by SPA
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World Camel Day: Tabuk Camels Symbolize Authenticity and Heritage

Photo by SPA
Photo by SPA

In Saudi Arabia, camels receive devoted attention and care from the government, the Saudi Press Agency reported. With a deep connection to the history and life of the Saudi people since ancient times, camels symbolize tradition, and the government harnesses all resources to preserve and nurture them.
The UN declared June 22 the World Camel Day in recognition of the historical significance of camels which ensure food security with their products of great nutritional value. The year 2024 has been designated by the UN as the International Year of Camelids.
Saudi Arabia participates in the preservation and safeguarding of camels, further solidifying the country's civilizational, historical, and cultural identity.
Tabuk, like other regions in the Kingdom, cares for this national resource.
Founded in 1407 AH, this field is renowned for organizing seasonal races and official celebrations of Arabian camels in the Kingdom. It accommodates over 900 stables and more than 10,000 camels raised to take part in winter and summer races and for breeding purposes.