Dior’s Cats and Dogs: Kim Jones Unleashes a Star-Studded, Art-Inspired Paris Collection

 Models present creations by designer Kim Jones as part of his Menswear ready-to-wear Spring/Summer 2025 collection show for fashion house Dior Homme during Men's Fashion Week in Paris, France, June 21, 2024. (Reuters)
Models present creations by designer Kim Jones as part of his Menswear ready-to-wear Spring/Summer 2025 collection show for fashion house Dior Homme during Men's Fashion Week in Paris, France, June 21, 2024. (Reuters)
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Dior’s Cats and Dogs: Kim Jones Unleashes a Star-Studded, Art-Inspired Paris Collection

 Models present creations by designer Kim Jones as part of his Menswear ready-to-wear Spring/Summer 2025 collection show for fashion house Dior Homme during Men's Fashion Week in Paris, France, June 21, 2024. (Reuters)
Models present creations by designer Kim Jones as part of his Menswear ready-to-wear Spring/Summer 2025 collection show for fashion house Dior Homme during Men's Fashion Week in Paris, France, June 21, 2024. (Reuters)

Kim Jones ’ starry collection for Dior was the fruit of an encounter with ceramicist Hylton Nel, whose pottery and ceramics, including animal motifs, gave the spring collection for the Parisian powerhouse a fun, arty—and domesticated lift.

Here are some highlights of Friday’s spring 2025 menswear collections:

It's raining cats and dogs – chic ones

On a drizzly day, Demi Moore swept in with her plus one — a Chihuahua called Pilaf— and when asked if she preferred dogs or cats, she replied, “isn’t it obvious?” In the same spirit as the Hollywood actress, Dior’s runway decor, inside the opulent grounds of the Left Bank’s grand 17th century Val-de-Grace, was very tongue-in-cheek. It consisted of sculptures depicting ceramic reclining nude felines and cheeky canines, inspired by Nel and the Dior designer’s own collection of trinkets.

Jones’ artistic references are no surprise. Known for his historical and cultural inspirations, he has previously drawn on his uncle’s photographs of Rudolf Nureyev and T.S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land.” This collection continued his tradition, bringing Nel’s whimsical ceramics to life.

Bird motifs on a moody, black tailored jacket and a cloche hat opened the show, the model holding a reclining nude feline. Sketch-like animal motifs then appeared throughout. Loose, boxy proportions on car coats and skorts felt airy and defined the spring silhouette of designs that channeled the muted pastels of glazed ceramics. A demure pearly neck accessory — a sort of strappy hood collar — was a standout that seemed at once historic and fashion-forward, a signature of the British designer.

Jones’ innovative tailoring shone through, as always. Spring-like coats that seemed soft and feminine were given a full stop in the form of black leather boots, in one of many plays of contrast. This juxtaposition of delicate and strong elements is a hallmark of Jones’ design. This season however, seemed more like a variation on a theme for the couturier, rather than something overtly new.

Junya's punk-like red carpet

An urban patchwork suit in black, with frayed edges but a crisp silhouette, opened Junya Watanabe’s latest menswear show, setting the stage for a focused and daring theme. The Japanese designer, known for his avant-garde creations and distinctive aesthetic, once again pushed the boundaries.

Bow ties poked out above red carpet-ready white tuxedo shirts on a literal red carpet runway. But this was no ordinary Awards Ceremony outfit — an earring here, a frayed hem there. This was the punk answer to red carpet season. Tuxedo pants suddenly became distressed black jeans. Electrified hair standing on end, paired with snipped-away patches of tartan and slashed inserts, evoked a Tim Burton’s Edward Scissorhands vibe.

Watanabe, celebrated for his progressive tailoring and deconstruction, continued to showcase his blending of historical references with modern subcultures.

The collection also reflected Watanabe’s penchant for collaboration, with elements reminiscent of his partnerships with brands like Levi’s and Carhartt. The fusion of high fashion with utilitarian elements added depth to the pieces, making them strikingly theatrical. Ready for the spotlight.



Dolce&Gabbana CEO Ready to Open Capital to New Investors

The logo of Italian designers Dolce & Gabbana is seen at a branch office at Bahnhofstrasse shopping street in Zurich, Switzerland September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann
The logo of Italian designers Dolce & Gabbana is seen at a branch office at Bahnhofstrasse shopping street in Zurich, Switzerland September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann
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Dolce&Gabbana CEO Ready to Open Capital to New Investors

The logo of Italian designers Dolce & Gabbana is seen at a branch office at Bahnhofstrasse shopping street in Zurich, Switzerland September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann
The logo of Italian designers Dolce & Gabbana is seen at a branch office at Bahnhofstrasse shopping street in Zurich, Switzerland September 9, 2020. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann

Dolce&Gabbana is ready to consider opening up its capital to new investors either through a listing or other routes, the Italian fashion house's CEO said.
"We are now ready to consider opening our capital to third parties through a listing or other financial instruments," CEO Alfonso Dolce said in an interview published on Monday in Corriere della Sera's L'Economia weekly supplement.
The financing must "not compromise the ethical value of our company, its respectful growth," said Dolce, brother of Domenico, who founded the group and runs it in partnership with Stefano Gabbana, Reuters reported.
In May, the CEO did not rule out a possible future stock market listing, but said the move was not a priority.
Dolce&Gabbana's revenue for the 2023-2024 fiscal year, which ended in March, was up 17% to 1.871 billion euros ($2.04 billion), said Dolce, adding that he hoped to repeat this growth this year.
The fashion house will open 12 new stores in the US, including at 695 Madison Avenue in New York, the former Hermes location, with more than 2,000 square meters over five floors.
"The United States are vital, we already have 72 stores, plus four in Canada, together they represent 28% of our turnover, compared to 16% in China," said Dolce.