UAE, Bahrain Denounce Doha Revoking Citizenship of 55 Qataris

UAE, Bahrain Denounce Doha Revoking Citizenship of 55 Qataris
TT

UAE, Bahrain Denounce Doha Revoking Citizenship of 55 Qataris

UAE, Bahrain Denounce Doha Revoking Citizenship of 55 Qataris

Bahrain’s Manama Center for Human Rights denounced Qatar revoking the citizenship of Sheikh Talib bin Mohammed bin Lahoum bin Shraim Al Morah along with 54 members of his family and relatives.
The center issued a statement saying that the collective punishment of the family is part and parcel of the systematic ‘chaos’ policy Doha practices against its citizens.

Such an act represents a loud violation of human rights, law, and international standards. Doha’s decision to withdraw the citizenships was arbitrary came without any legal grounds.

More so, the Emirates Human Rights Association, in a statement, said, "It is a step that violates all their legal rights, the principles of human rights and exposes them to displacement."

Mohammed Salem Al Ka'abi, Chairman of EHRA, said, "This is an unprecedented international step," adding, "These Qatari citizens have not been subjected to any trials, but their citizenship has been suddenly withdrawn. They have become stateless and are subject to full deprivation of citizenship rights from health care, housing, education, work, freedom of movement and others."

Al Ka'abi expressed regret for this indiscriminate decision, which included children and women, stressing that nationality is an inherent human right. He called on all human rights organizations to play their role and monitor their situation and support them.

The Saudi National Society for Human Rights, NSHR, also declared its surprise towards the sudden withdrawal of citizenship from Sheikh Talib, along with 54 other members of his family and the tribe of Al Morah, including a number of children and 18 women.

NSHR statement said the move violates all the tribe’s legal rights and the principles of human rights, and exposes them to displacement in an international precedent, similar only to what the Qatari government did in 2005, when it displaced more than 6,000 of its citizens from the tribe of Al Ghofran and withdrew their citizenships without any justification or reason compatible with international standards.

The 55 persons were Qatari citizens who had not been given the right to any trials, and that the withdrawal of citizenship came abruptly having been citizens with a permanent identity, they have now become displaced without a homeland or stability and are subjected to all kinds of risks including deprivation of health care and housing.

NSHR called upon all humanitarian bodies and organizations to play their role and monitor the situation of these victims, saying, "We are now witnessing the 36th session of the Human Rights Council, which seeks to promote the values of protection and advocacy for every right that is clearly and unequivocally denied, and that silence about this blatant abuse, flagrant violation and collective punishment of innocents whose only guilt is that the authorities in Qatar felt that they should be punished, is like participation in it and it is a blow to the credibility of human rights and their universal values."

"All of these persons are now threatened with all kinds of risks arising from the withdrawal of citizenship, and any danger to them is a condemnation of organizations, bodies and human rights around the world, especially the Qatari Human Rights Society, which has ignored this crime and never mentioned it," added NSHR.



Saudi Arabia’s Non-oil Exports Rise 3.3% in Q1 of 2024

The Saudi government continues to support non-oil activities to achieve economic growth (Asharq Al-Awsat)
The Saudi government continues to support non-oil activities to achieve economic growth (Asharq Al-Awsat)
TT

Saudi Arabia’s Non-oil Exports Rise 3.3% in Q1 of 2024

The Saudi government continues to support non-oil activities to achieve economic growth (Asharq Al-Awsat)
The Saudi government continues to support non-oil activities to achieve economic growth (Asharq Al-Awsat)

Saudi Arabia’s non-oil exports recorded an annual increase of 3.3 percent in the first quarter of 2024 compared to the same period in 2023, the General Authority for Statistics (GASTAT) revealed on Thursday.

 

This increase was mainly attributed to a rise in the value of re-exports, which reached SR6.4 billion in March 2024, an 18 percent increase compared to SR5.4 billion in March 2023.

The International Trade Q1 2024 report by GASTAT pointed to positive trends in the Kingdom’s export sector.

The report revealed a significant 19 percent increase in exports of chemical and allied industry products in March 2024 compared to the previous month, reaching a value of SR6.5 billion in March.

Merchandise exports and non-oil exports also rose by five percent and six percent respectively in March, compared to February 2024.


Earth-like Planet Discovered by Researchers

Gliese 12 b's distance of 40 lights years away means it is too far away to experience more closely (NASA)
Gliese 12 b's distance of 40 lights years away means it is too far away to experience more closely (NASA)
TT

Earth-like Planet Discovered by Researchers

Gliese 12 b's distance of 40 lights years away means it is too far away to experience more closely (NASA)
Gliese 12 b's distance of 40 lights years away means it is too far away to experience more closely (NASA)

Scientists at the University of Warwick say they have been part of an international team to discover a new new habitable Earth-sized planet.

Working with NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), they said Gliese 12 b has the same temperature as the 2022 UK heatwave and is one of the few known rocky planets where humans could theoretically survive, BBC reported.

But the planet's distance of 40 lights years away means it is too far away to experience more closely, the university said.

Warwick astrophysicist Dr Thomas Wilson said: "This is a really exciting discovery and will help our research into planets similar to Earth across our galaxy."

The planet has an estimated surface temperature of about 42C, but the scientists said they were still unsure of what, if any, its atmosphere was like.

It orbits its version of the sun every 12.8 days and is a similar size to Earth.

The planet’s equivalent of the Sun, called Gliese 12, is a cool, red dwarf located in the constellation Pisces and the planet receives 1.6 times more energy from its star as Earth does from the sun, the university said.

The team used data from NASA and ESA’s satellites to confirm the planet’s existence and characteristics like its size, temperature, and distance away from Earth.

"Thrillingly, this planet is the closest Earth-sized and temperature planet we know," Dr Wilson added.

"The light we are seeing now is from 1984 (40 years ago) – that’s how long it has taken to reach us here on Earth.

"Planets like Gliese 12 b are very few and far between, so for us to be able to examine one this closely and learn about its atmosphere and temperature is very rare."

According to BBC, Larissa Palethorpe, co-lead of the study and doctoral student at the University of Edinburgh and University College London said it was "a unique candidate" for further atmospheric study to help unlock some aspects of our own solar system’s evolution.

"Earth remains habitable, but Venus does not due to its complete loss of water. Gliese 12 b’s atmosphere could teach us a lot about the habitability pathways planets take as they develop," she added.


Massive Cradle of Baby Stars Revealed in New Space Telescope Images

This image provided by the European Space Agency on Thursday, May 23, 2024, shows Euclid’s new image of galaxy cluster Abell 2390. (European Space Agency via AP)
This image provided by the European Space Agency on Thursday, May 23, 2024, shows Euclid’s new image of galaxy cluster Abell 2390. (European Space Agency via AP)
TT

Massive Cradle of Baby Stars Revealed in New Space Telescope Images

This image provided by the European Space Agency on Thursday, May 23, 2024, shows Euclid’s new image of galaxy cluster Abell 2390. (European Space Agency via AP)
This image provided by the European Space Agency on Thursday, May 23, 2024, shows Euclid’s new image of galaxy cluster Abell 2390. (European Space Agency via AP)

A massive cradle of baby stars has been observed in new detail by a European space telescope, adding to its celestial collection of images.
The European Space Agency released the photos from the Euclid observatory on Thursday, The Associated Press reported. They were taken following the telescope’s Florida launch last year as a warm-up act to its main job currently underway: surveying the so-called dark universe.
From its perch 1 million miles (1.6 million kilometers) from Earth, Euclid will spend the next several years observing billions of galaxies covering more than one-third of the sky. The shape and size of all these galaxies can help scientists understand the mysterious dark energy and dark matter that make up most of the universe.
"Euclid is at the very beginning of its exciting journey to map the structure of the universe," the space agency's director general, Josef Aschbacher, said in a statement.
Among the newly released pictures is one of an enormous cradle of baby stars some 1,300 light-years away known as Messier 78. A light-year is 5.8 trillion miles. Euclid's infrared camera peered through the dust enveloping the stellar nursery, revealing new regions of star formation, according to ESA.


Egypt: Central Bank Keeps Key Interest Rates Unchanged

FILE PHOTO: A general view of the new headquarters of Central Bank of Egypt, at the New Administrative Capital (NAC) east of Cairo, Egypt December 8, 2023. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: A general view of the new headquarters of Central Bank of Egypt, at the New Administrative Capital (NAC) east of Cairo, Egypt December 8, 2023. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh/File Photo
TT

Egypt: Central Bank Keeps Key Interest Rates Unchanged

FILE PHOTO: A general view of the new headquarters of Central Bank of Egypt, at the New Administrative Capital (NAC) east of Cairo, Egypt December 8, 2023. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: A general view of the new headquarters of Central Bank of Egypt, at the New Administrative Capital (NAC) east of Cairo, Egypt December 8, 2023. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh/File Photo

Egypt's central bank kept its overnight interest rates steady on Thursday, as expected, saying that while economic growth had slowed, rising non-food inflation had offset a steady decline in food inflation.
The meeting of the central bank's Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) was its first since Egypt signed an $8 billion financial support agreement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in March, when it hiked rates by 600 basis points (bps).
The MPC on Thursday left the lending rate unchanged at 28.25% and the deposit rate at 27.25%, it said in a statement.
The hold was widely expected, with only one of 19 analysts in a Reuters poll forecasting that the MPC would lower rates.
Interest rates are still well below the headline inflation rate, which was running at 32.5% in April. Inflation has declined from a record 38% in September.
"Forecasts indicate that inflation has already peaked and thus is expected to moderate in 2024 as inflationary pressures begin to subside," the MPC said in a statement accompanying the interest rates decision.
The MPC said economic growth had slowed to 2.3% in the fourth quarter of 2023 from 4.2% a year earlier and that indicators suggested growth would remain subdued in the first quarter of 2024.
The central bank raised interest rates on March 6 as part of its agreement with the IMF, bringing total increases since the beginning of the year to 800 bps.
As part of the IMF agreement, Egypt allowed its currency to tumble to under 50 to the dollar after having fixed it at 30.85 for a year. The Egyptian pound has since strengthened to about 47.1 to the dollar.


Pro-Palestinian Protesters Leave after Drexel University Decides to Have Police Clear Encampment

Police stand by as protestors prepare to leave a pro-Palestinian encampment at Drexel University early Thursday, May 23, 2004 in Philadelphia. (Alejandro A. Alvarez/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)
Police stand by as protestors prepare to leave a pro-Palestinian encampment at Drexel University early Thursday, May 23, 2004 in Philadelphia. (Alejandro A. Alvarez/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)
TT

Pro-Palestinian Protesters Leave after Drexel University Decides to Have Police Clear Encampment

Police stand by as protestors prepare to leave a pro-Palestinian encampment at Drexel University early Thursday, May 23, 2004 in Philadelphia. (Alejandro A. Alvarez/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)
Police stand by as protestors prepare to leave a pro-Palestinian encampment at Drexel University early Thursday, May 23, 2004 in Philadelphia. (Alejandro A. Alvarez/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)

Protesters packed up their belongings and left a pro-Palestinian encampment at Drexel University on Thursday after the school announced a decision to have police clear the encampment, The Associated Press reported.
University President John Fry said in a statement that he decided to have campus police and public safety officers join Philadelphia police in clearing the encampment as peacefully as possible. News outlets reported that police gave protesters a warning to clear the encampment and protesters left.
Fry said the university is committed to protecting the community members’ right to assemble peacefully and express their views, but he has the responsibility and authority to regulate campus gatherings to ensure safety and fulfill the mission to educate students.
“An unauthorized encampment that involves large numbers of people unaffiliated with Drexel trespassing on our campus is illegal,” Fry said. “The language and chants coming from this demonstration, underscored by protestors’ repugnant ‘demands,’ must now come to an end.”
Protesters gathered their belongings as dozens of officers on bicycles arrived around 5:20 a.m., but in less than a half hour only a few items remained on the Korman Family Quad where the 35-tent encampment had been, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported.
“The campers picked up their belongings for the most part and left by their own free will,” AP quoted Philadelphia Police Sgt. Eric Gripp as saying
In a statement posted online early Thursday, protest organizers said they had launched a “strategic retreat” to ensure the “safe passage of all people and resources out of the liberated zone.” They said that neither city nor campus police delivered a warning to clear the encampment but rather “we warned ourselves.”
The organizers also said “we succeeded in our aim to disrupt — a university-wide lockdown imposed by cowardly leadership and an excessive police presence drained university resources for six days.” The group also vowed to stay active, writing: “We won’t back down, we will return, and we will come back stronger.”
The encampment had persisted despite Fry's threat earlier this week to have the encampment cleared. Fry said Tuesday that classes would be held virtually for a third day on Wednesday after administrators tried to open a line of communication to the protesters but were rebuffed. News outlets reported that the university announced Wednesday night that the campus would return to normal operations Thursday.
In his statement early Thursday, Fry said previous requests for protesters to disperse had been ignored, but he was asking Drexel affiliates to leave the encampment so police could “escort any remaining trespassers off our campus.”
A wave of pro-Palestinian tent encampments on campuses has led to over 3,000 arrests nationwide.
Harvard University held its commencement Thursday following a weekslong pro-Palestinian encampment. Hundreds of students in graduation robes walked out chanting “Free, Free Palestine” a day after the school announced that 13 Harvard students who participated in a protest encampment would not be able to receive diplomas alongside their classmates.
Also Thursday, the leaders of Northwestern University and Rutgers University are expected to testify at a House Committee on Education and the Workforce hearing about concessions they gave to pro-Palestinian protesters to end demonstrations on their campus. The chancellor of the University of California, Los Angeles, also was scheduled to appear at the latest in a series of hearings looking into how colleges have responded to the protests and allegations of antisemitism.


Saudi Foreign Minister Meets with Austrian Counterpart

The Saudi Minister of Foreign Affairs, Prince Faisal bin Farhan bin Abdullah, met on Thursday with his Austrian counterpart, Alexander Schallenberg. SPA
The Saudi Minister of Foreign Affairs, Prince Faisal bin Farhan bin Abdullah, met on Thursday with his Austrian counterpart, Alexander Schallenberg. SPA
TT

Saudi Foreign Minister Meets with Austrian Counterpart

The Saudi Minister of Foreign Affairs, Prince Faisal bin Farhan bin Abdullah, met on Thursday with his Austrian counterpart, Alexander Schallenberg. SPA
The Saudi Minister of Foreign Affairs, Prince Faisal bin Farhan bin Abdullah, met on Thursday with his Austrian counterpart, Alexander Schallenberg. SPA

The Saudi Minister of Foreign Affairs, Prince Faisal bin Farhan bin Abdullah, met on Thursday with his Austrian counterpart, Alexander Schallenberg.

During the meeting, they reviewed the distinguished relations between the Kingdom and Austria and ways to bolster them to serve the interests of the two countries and peoples. They also exchanged views on regional and international issues.

Senior officials attended the meeting.


Nadal is in French Open Field, Will Face Zverev in 1st Round

Spain's Rafael Nadal takes part in a practice session ahead of The French Open tennis tournament on Court Philippe-Chatrier at The Roland Garros Complex in Paris on May 22, 2024. (Photo by EMMANUEL DUNAND / AFP)
Spain's Rafael Nadal takes part in a practice session ahead of The French Open tennis tournament on Court Philippe-Chatrier at The Roland Garros Complex in Paris on May 22, 2024. (Photo by EMMANUEL DUNAND / AFP)
TT

Nadal is in French Open Field, Will Face Zverev in 1st Round

Spain's Rafael Nadal takes part in a practice session ahead of The French Open tennis tournament on Court Philippe-Chatrier at The Roland Garros Complex in Paris on May 22, 2024. (Photo by EMMANUEL DUNAND / AFP)
Spain's Rafael Nadal takes part in a practice session ahead of The French Open tennis tournament on Court Philippe-Chatrier at The Roland Garros Complex in Paris on May 22, 2024. (Photo by EMMANUEL DUNAND / AFP)

Rafael Nadal is in the French Open field, after all, and Thursday's draw set up the 14-time champion for a challenging first-round matchup against No. 4 seed Alexander Zverev.

“That’s going to be hard, but he is a warrior," tournament director Amélie Mauresmo said. "Anything is possible with Rafa.”

This is expected to be Nadal's last appearance at Roland Garros, and he had been coy about whether he would compete this time after two seasons of off-and-on action because of injuries, including a surgically repaired hip that forced him to miss his favorite tournament a year ago, The Associated Press reported.

After a loss at the Italian Open this month, Nadal said he needed to think about whether to play in Paris. But the Spaniard, who turns 38 on June 3, has been practicing on the red clay at Roland Garros this week and his name was officially in the bracket.

The French Open begins on Sunday.

The Nadal-Zverev winner could be on a path toward a potential semifinal meeting against No. 1 seed and defending champion Novak Djokovic, whose opening opponent is French wild-card entry Pierre-Hugues Herbert.

The potential men's quarterfinals are Djokovic against No. 7 Casper Ruud — who lost to Nadal in the 2022 final and 24-time major champion Djokovic in the 2023 final — and Zverev or Nadal against No. 5 Daniil Medvedev in the top half of the bracket, and No. 2 Jannik Sinner against No. 8 Hubert Hurkacz, and No. 3 Carlos Alcaraz versus No. 6 Andrey Rublev in the bottom half.

In the women's draw, one intriguing semifinal could be No. 1 Iga Swiatek, who seeks a third consecutive French Open title, against No. 3 Coco Gauff, the reigning US Open champion who lost to Swiatek in the Paris final two years ago.

“I’m starting to really feel at home here,” Swiatek said at the draw ceremony.
She will start off against someone who was in the qualifying rounds, and then could face four-time major champion and former No. 1 Naomi Osaka.

The possible women's quarterfinals are Swiatek vs. No. 5 Marketa Vondrousova, and Gauff vs. No. 8 Ons Jabeur on the top half, and No. 2 Aryna Sabalenka vs. No. 6 Maria Sakkari, and No. 4 Elena Rybakina vs. No. 7 Zheng Qinwen on the bottom half.

Despite all of the success Nadal has enjoyed at the event — his career record there is 112-3 — the French tennis federation decided not to go against its usual rules that follow the ATP and WTA rankings to determine seedings.

So the 22-time major champion's inactivity-affected ranking of No. 276 left him unseeded — which meant Nadal could be selected in the computerized, random draw to face any opponent to start. His matchup against Zverev, the 2020 US Open runner-up and Tokyo Olympic gold medalist, is a rematch of their 2022 French Open semifinal that ended when Zverev tore ligaments in his right ankle.

Zverev, a 27-year-old from Germany, enters Roland Garros as a serious contender for what would be his first major title, coming off a trophy at the Italian Open on clay.

He's drawn attention lately for a serious matter away from tennis: A court proceeding is scheduled to begin next week in Germany related to accusations of physical abuse made by an ex-girlfriend of his. Zverev does not need to attend and has said he won't.

Another high-profile first-round matchup pits a pair of three-time Grand Slam champions against each other: Andy Murray, who just turned 37, versus Stan Wawrinka, who is 39. First-rounders to keep an eye on also include Australian Open runner-up Zheng against popular French veteran Alizé Cornet, who has said she will retire after the French Open, and two-time major finalist Karolina Pliskova against No. 15 seed Elina Svitolina, a three-time Grand Slam semifinalist.

One expected withdrawal was announced Thursday: fifth-ranked Jessica Pegula, an American who has reached six major quarterfinals.


Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Meets with British Ambassador to Saudi Arabia

Photo by SPA
Photo by SPA
TT

Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Meets with British Ambassador to Saudi Arabia

Photo by SPA
Photo by SPA

The Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Cabinet Member, and Envoy for Climate, Adel bin Ahmed Al-Jubeir, met on Thursday with the British Ambassador to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Neil Crompton.

During the meeting, the two sides discussed issues of common interest and Saudi-UK ties.


Yellen Concerned about Israel's Threats to Cut off Palestinian Banks

US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen attends a press conference at the US Ambassador's residence in Beijing on April 8, 2024. (Photo by Pedro Pardo / AFP)
US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen attends a press conference at the US Ambassador's residence in Beijing on April 8, 2024. (Photo by Pedro Pardo / AFP)
TT

Yellen Concerned about Israel's Threats to Cut off Palestinian Banks

US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen attends a press conference at the US Ambassador's residence in Beijing on April 8, 2024. (Photo by Pedro Pardo / AFP)
US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen attends a press conference at the US Ambassador's residence in Beijing on April 8, 2024. (Photo by Pedro Pardo / AFP)

US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said on Thursday she was concerned by a threat from Israel to cut off Palestinian banks from their Israeli correspondent banks, a move that would close a critical lifeline for the Palestinian economy.

Yellen told a news conference ahead of a G7 finance ministers meeting beginning on Friday that the US and its partners "need to do everything possible to increase humanitarian assistance to Palestinians in Gaza, to curtail violence in the West Bank, and to stabilize the West Bank's economy."

She said she would bring up the issue at the meeting of the Group of Seven industrial democracies in the lakeside resort town of Stresa in northern Italy. "I expect other countries to express concern about the impact of such a decision on the West Bank economy. I think this would have a very adverse effect also on Israel."

Israel's Finance Minister Belazel Smotrich has said he cannot renew a waiver that expires on July 1 which allows Israeli banks to process shekel payments for services and salaries tied to the Palestinian Authority, Reuters reported.

In a post on the X social media site reacting to Yellen's comments, Smotrich said he could not sign the waiver because Palestinians are still funding "terrorism" and Israeli banks can be sued for violating anti-terrorism financing laws.

"The financial system of the Palestinian Authority is infected with terrorism up to its neck," said Smotrich, a member of a far-right Israeli coalition partner that supports settlements in the West Bank. He called critics of the policy "hypocrites."

Yellen said it was important to keep open the Israeli-Palestinian correspondent banking relationships to allow battered economies in the West Bank and Gaza to function and help ensure security.

"These banking channels are critical for processing transactions that enable almost $8 billion a year in imports from Israel, including electricity, water, fuel, and food, as well as facilitating almost $2 billion a year in exports on which Palestinian livelihoods depend," Yellen said.

She added that Israel's withholding of revenues collected on behalf of the Palestinian authority also threatens the West Bank's economic stability.

"My team and I have also engaged directly with the Israeli government to urge action that would bolster the Palestinian economy and, I believe, Israel's own security," Yellen said.

Financial tensions between Israel and the US have risen over US sanctions imposed on Israeli settlers in the West Bank.


US to Announce Additional $275ml in Military Aid for Ukraine

A sapper inspects fragments of a Russian air bomb that hit a living area injuring ten in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrii Marienko)
A sapper inspects fragments of a Russian air bomb that hit a living area injuring ten in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrii Marienko)
TT

US to Announce Additional $275ml in Military Aid for Ukraine

A sapper inspects fragments of a Russian air bomb that hit a living area injuring ten in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrii Marienko)
A sapper inspects fragments of a Russian air bomb that hit a living area injuring ten in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Wednesday, May 22, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrii Marienko)

The United States is expected to announce an additional $275 million in military aid for Ukraine on Friday as Kyiv struggles to hold off advances by Russian troops in the Kharkiv region, two US officials say.

This will be the fourth installment of military aid for Ukraine since Congress passed a long-delayed foreign aid bill late last month and comes as the Biden administration has pledged to keep weapons flowing regularly and to get them to the front lines as quickly as possible, The AP reported.

The package includes high mobility artillery rocket systems, or HIMARS, as well 155 mm and 105 mm high-demand artillery rounds, according to the two US officials. They spoke on the condition of anonymity to provide details of the aid package before the public announcement.

It follows a monthly gathering Monday of about 50 defense leaders from Europe and elsewhere who meet regularly to coordinate getting more military aid to Ukraine. At this latest meeting, Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said Ukraine was in a “moment of challenge” due to Russia’s new onslaught on Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second-largest city. He pledged to keep weapons moving “week after week.”

In the month since President Joe Biden signed the $95 billion foreign aid package, which included about $61 billion for Ukraine, the US has announced and started to send almost $1.7 billion in weapons pulled from Pentagon stockpiles.

It’s also announced $6 billion in funding through the Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative. That pays for longer-term contracts with the defense industry and means that the weapons could take many months or years to arrive.

With this latest package, the US has now provided almost $51 billion in military assistance to Ukraine since Russia invaded in February 2022.