Sudanese Airplane Hits Huge Bird before Landing

 A Boeing 737 MAX takes off during a flight test in Renton, Washington January 29, 2016. | File Reuters
A Boeing 737 MAX takes off during a flight test in Renton, Washington January 29, 2016. | File Reuters
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Sudanese Airplane Hits Huge Bird before Landing

 A Boeing 737 MAX takes off during a flight test in Renton, Washington January 29, 2016. | File Reuters
A Boeing 737 MAX takes off during a flight test in Renton, Washington January 29, 2016. | File Reuters

A Sudanese airline has called on authorities at the Khartoum International Airport to address the “bird phenomenon” and its threats against aviation, people, and properties.

This call came after one of the company’s airplanes survived a disaster after it hit a huge seasonal bird, following its take-off from Ad Damazeen Airport.

The jet safely landed at Khartoum airport, but the crash caused serious damage to the aircraft's nose, just metres from the pilot's cockpit.

In a press release, the Badr Airlines, owner of the damaged jet, said the J4-314 flight took off on schedule from Damazeen Airport heading to Khartoum, but, "it crashed into a huge seasonal bird after about 45 minutes in the air, which caused serious damages in the jet’s nose."

The pilot was able to land normally at Khartoum Airport, thanks to the instructions mentioned in the jet’s operating guide.

All passengers were safe and were not affected by the accident. Media sources reported that the bird that caused the incident is one of the giant eagles that migrate to the country in the fall, and is locally known as the «bald hawk».

Badr Airlines said the incident is not "normal". But, the company dealt with the situation properly, which led to a safe and normal landing, without affecting the passengers.

Badr called the authorities of Khartoum Airport to put an end to the “bird phenomenon” threatening lives and properties.

This accident is not the first of its kind. In September 2016, about 108 passengers and a six-member crew survived a disastrous crash in a Boeing 737, heading from El Fasher west of the country to Khartoum.

The later hit an eagle in the air, and the collision caused a large hole in its outer structure, which obliged it to return, and to land safely at El Fasher airport.



Gulf States Record High Temperatures After Summer Solstice

Days will gradually shorten as the Earth orbits until the autumnal equinox on September 22 (SPA)
Days will gradually shorten as the Earth orbits until the autumnal equinox on September 22 (SPA)
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Gulf States Record High Temperatures After Summer Solstice

Days will gradually shorten as the Earth orbits until the autumnal equinox on September 22 (SPA)
Days will gradually shorten as the Earth orbits until the autumnal equinox on September 22 (SPA)

The Arab Gulf region saw temperatures soar earlier this week after a hot spell, with Makkah, Saudi Arabia, hitting 51 degrees Celsius last Monday.

 

Despite this, Saudi Arabia’s National Center for Meteorology assured Asharq Al-Awsat that current summer temperatures haven’t exceeded those of the past three years, typically ranging from 38 to 48 degrees Celsius over the season’s 92 days.

 

The summer solstice, marking the start of astronomical summer in the Northern Hemisphere, occurred on June 20 at 11:50 PM local time, with the sun directly over the Tropic of Cancer.

 

Days will gradually shorten as the Earth orbits until the autumnal equinox on September 22.

 

In recent days, Saudi Arabia reached highs of 49 degrees Celsius in Al-Qaysumah and Al-Ahsa.

 

Meanwhile, the UAE's Abu Dhabi, Dubai, and Al Ain recorded 47 degrees Celsius, and Oman saw its highest temperature of 49.2 degrees Celsius in Al-Dhahirah.

 

Qatar’s Jumayliyah hit 48 degrees Celsius, while Kuwait anticipated 50 degrees Celsius in Jahra.

 

Bahrain expected temperatures to reach 45 degrees Celsius over the weekend.