PIF Unveils Innovative Qiddiya Project Logo

The Qiddiya city logo.
The Qiddiya city logo.
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PIF Unveils Innovative Qiddiya Project Logo

The Qiddiya city logo.
The Qiddiya city logo.

The Saudi Public Investment Fund revealed the logo of the Qiddiya Project that plans to build the largest cultural, recreational and sports city in the Kingdom. The design of the innovative logo reflects the unique geography of the region where the city will be established.

The Qiddiya project was announced earlier this year.

The city will be constructed 40 kilometers away from central Riyadh in the Qiddiya region..

The design of the logo was inspired from the breathtaking Tuwaiq mountain range in the Qiddiya region that will overlook the city once it is complete. The lines of the logo reflect the abilities of the residents of the Kingdom and their vibrant colors represent the residents’ diverse capabilities and identities. The logo embodies the project’s goal of providing special recreational destination for Saudis where they will be able to unleash their talents in various fields.

The Qiddiya project highlights the heritage of the region and reflects the beauty of the location that will become an important landmark that will meet the demands of the Kingdom’s recreational, cultural and social needs.

Qiddiya city is one of the significant investment initiatives that provides a diverse number of recreational venues. It also supports the Saudi Vision 2030 that aims at diversifying the sources of national income, bolster the Kingdom’s economy and create job opportunities for the local youth.

Qiddiya city allows visitors to enjoy a number of recreational and educational activities through six main venues that include an amusement park, sports arenas, racing rings, water and snow games, gorgeous natural vistas and several cultural and heritage centers.

Construction of Qiddiya city is expected to begin in 2018 and the first phase of the city will be opened in 2022.



Lebanon Tourism Season Revives Economic Outlook

People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
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Lebanon Tourism Season Revives Economic Outlook

People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
People are seen at the arrival lounge at Beirut International Airport, Lebanon. (Asharq Al-Awsat)

The surge in visitors to Lebanon during Eid al-Adha and high demand for summer concert bookings are boosting hopes for a revival in tourism.

This sector is crucial for reigniting positive economic growth after about nine months of challenging conditions due to the Gaza war and subsequent border clashes between Hezbollah and Israel in southern Lebanon.

Contrary to earlier fears this month of possible Israeli strikes inside Lebanon, Ali Hamieh, caretaker Minister of Public Works and Transport, reported a daily average of 14,000 arrivals at Beirut’s Rafic Hariri International Airport, with numbers on the rise.

Jean Abboud, President of the Association of Travel and Tourism Agents, confirmed that despite initial concerns, booking rates have bounced back to 90-95% after Israeli threats of a mid-month strike. Most arrivals are Lebanese expatriates and foreign workers.

Before the summer season’s anticipated surge, Lebanon saw a 5.37% decrease in arrivals, with air traffic down by 9.34% and passenger numbers at Beirut International Airport dropping by 6.84% in the first five months of this year, totaling 2.29 million travelers compared to 2.46 million last year.

These declines were linked to the border clashes.

Lebanon’s tourism sector, generating over $5 billion annually in recent years, ranks as the country’s second most vital revenue stream after expatriate remittances, which officially approach $7 billion.

Together, they contribute more than half of Lebanon’s national income, which has dropped sharply from about $55 billion to under $22 billion due to the ongoing financial and currency crises that erupted five years ago.

Despite significant losses during peak tourism seasons like Christmas, Easter, and Eid al-Fitr, a report by Bank Audi indicated that Lebanon’s tourism revenues lost over $1 billion in the first six months of the Gaza conflict, driven by a 24% drop in tourist arrivals.

On average, tourists spend around $3,000 during their stay in Lebanon.