Trump Says North Korea ‘Threat to Civilized World,’ Time for 'Patience' Over

US President Donald Trump and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands before a working lunch at Akasaka Palace in Tokyo, Japan November 6, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US President Donald Trump and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands before a working lunch at Akasaka Palace in Tokyo, Japan November 6, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Trump Says North Korea ‘Threat to Civilized World,’ Time for 'Patience' Over

US President Donald Trump and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands before a working lunch at Akasaka Palace in Tokyo, Japan November 6, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US President Donald Trump and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands before a working lunch at Akasaka Palace in Tokyo, Japan November 6, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

The time for "strategic patience" with North Korea is over, US President Donald Trump said Monday as he declared Pyongyang "a threat to the civilized world.”

Trump has signaled in the past that Washington could look beyond a diplomatic solution to the North's nuclear weapons ambitions, and consider military intervention.

The North's nuclear program is "a threat to the civilized world and international peace and stability," Trump told reporters on the second day of a trip to Asia.

"The era of strategic patience is over," he declared alongside his host, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, denouncing efforts by the Obama administration to manage Pyongyang.

"Some people say my rhetoric is very strong but look what has happened with very weak rhetoric in last 25 years," said Trump at the news conference.

Abe, whose own nation has seen North Korean missiles fired over its northern island amid threats by Pyongyang to "sink" it into the sea, backed the bullish stance.

"We always support President Trump's policy that all options are on the table," in reining in North Korea over its provocative actions, he said.

Abe announced Japan will freeze the assets of 35 North Korean groups and individuals as a new sanction.

The United Nations has adopted multiple rounds of sanctions against the reclusive North, the most recent in September following its sixth nuclear test and a flurry of missile launches.

The president arrived in Asia with tensions over North Korea at fever pitch, as US bombers fly sorties over the Korean peninsula and concerns mount that Pyongyang might stage another nuclear or missile test.

Trump began his marathon trip in belligerent form, warning on Sunday that "no dictator" should underestimate US resolve, a clear swipe at North Korea and its leader Kim Jong-Un.

However in a pre-recorded interview broadcast on US TV he held out the prospect of talks with Pyongyang, saying he would "certainly be open" to meeting Kim.

"I would sit down with anybody," he said. "I don't think it's strength or weakness, I think sitting down with people is not a bad thing.”

"So I would certainly be open to doing that but we'll see where it goes, I think we're far too early,” Trump said on the "Full Measure" show.

Following his meeting with Abe Monday, Trump said he was committed to achieving "free, fair, and reciprocal" trade with Japan to lower the US trade deficit.

He also said he wanted to work with Japan to "sort out" trade problems with the country.



Netanyahu Receives Warning from Panel Probing Submarine Purchase 

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a state memorial ceremony at Nachalat Yitzhak cemetery in Tel Aviv on June 18, 2024. (AFP)
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a state memorial ceremony at Nachalat Yitzhak cemetery in Tel Aviv on June 18, 2024. (AFP)
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Netanyahu Receives Warning from Panel Probing Submarine Purchase 

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a state memorial ceremony at Nachalat Yitzhak cemetery in Tel Aviv on June 18, 2024. (AFP)
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a state memorial ceremony at Nachalat Yitzhak cemetery in Tel Aviv on June 18, 2024. (AFP)

An Israeli commission investigating suspected wrongdoing in government purchases of submarines and missile boats from Germany issued a warning to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday.

The panel notified Netanyahu that based on evidence gathered thus far, it could ultimately determine that he had used his position as prime minister between 2009 and 2016 to greenlight the purchases without due process.

"By doing so, he (Netanyahu) endangered the security of the state and harmed the state of Israel's foreign relations and economic interests," said the panel in its written decision, made public on Monday.

Netanyahu in response said that the submarines were central to Israel's security "in ensuring its existence against Iran, which is trying to destroy us".

"History will prove that Prime Minister Netanyahu was right on this issue as well and made the right decisions for the security of Israel," the statement from his office said.

The commission, established under the previous government in 2022, said that it will soon publish unclassified parts of the evidence collected during the probe into the deal, worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

Netanyahu has struggled to salvage his security credentials since the Oct. 7 attack by Hamas-led fighters, who killed 1,200 people and took more than 250 hostages to Gaza according to Israeli tallies, the worst attack on Jews since the Holocaust.

In the Israeli assault on Gaza that followed, more than 37,000 people have been killed according to Gaza health authorities.