Twitter Says it Won't Block World Leaders

People watch a TV news program showing the Twitter post of US President Donald Trump while reporting North Korea's nuclear issue, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul. AP
People watch a TV news program showing the Twitter post of US President Donald Trump while reporting North Korea's nuclear issue, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul. AP
TT

Twitter Says it Won't Block World Leaders

People watch a TV news program showing the Twitter post of US President Donald Trump while reporting North Korea's nuclear issue, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul. AP
People watch a TV news program showing the Twitter post of US President Donald Trump while reporting North Korea's nuclear issue, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul. AP

Twitter announced Friday it would not block the accounts of world leaders even if their statements are "controversial," citing a need to promote a "public conversation" on political issues.

"Twitter is here to serve and help advance the global, public conversation. Elected world leaders play a critical role in that conversation because of their outsized impact on our society," Agence France Presse cited the California-based company.

"Blocking a world leader from Twitter or removing their controversial tweets would hide important information people should be able to see and debate. It would also not silence that leader, but it would certainly hamper necessary discussion around their words and actions," Twitter said in a blog post.

The announcement came just days after a tweet from President Donald Trump hinting at the use of US nuclear weapons sparked criticism that the social network was allowing threats of violence.

Twitter made no specific reference to Trump or his tweet this week saying he has a "nuclear button" which is "bigger and more powerful" than that of North Korea's.

Some activists said Twitter should have banned Trump and one group projected  images on the company's headquarters with a message "@jack is #complicit," a reference to chief executive Jack Dorsey and "Ban @realDonaldTrump."

The group called Resistance SF accused Dorsey of "endangering the world" and violating its own rules by not banning Trump.

Friday's announcement comes less than a month after Twitter began enforcing new rules aimed at filtering out "hateful" and "abusive" content on the social network, including messages which promote or glorify violence.

Twitter, which has struggled to maintain an open platform without allowing violence or hate speech, said at the time it would not cut off accounts for military or government entities.

Friday's statement left open the possibility however that Twitter could remove specific tweets from political leaders which violate its policies.



Denmark's European Energy Signs Long-term Power Deals with Microsoft

FILE PHOTO: Microsoft signage is seen at the company's headquarters in Redmond, Washington, US, January 18, 2023. REUTERS/Matt Mills McKnight/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Microsoft signage is seen at the company's headquarters in Redmond, Washington, US, January 18, 2023. REUTERS/Matt Mills McKnight/File Photo
TT

Denmark's European Energy Signs Long-term Power Deals with Microsoft

FILE PHOTO: Microsoft signage is seen at the company's headquarters in Redmond, Washington, US, January 18, 2023. REUTERS/Matt Mills McKnight/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Microsoft signage is seen at the company's headquarters in Redmond, Washington, US, January 18, 2023. REUTERS/Matt Mills McKnight/File Photo

Danish renewables group European Energy has entered into several long-term power purchasing agreements (PPAs) with Microsoft to supply the US tech firm with green electricity, the Copenhagen-based company said on Wednesday.
"The renewable energy will be produced by a portfolio of wind and solar assets in Sweden and Denmark," European Energy said in a statement.
It will under the agreements deliver more than 3.6 terawatt hours (TWh) over the contract period, supporting Microsoft's goal to meet all its energy demand with power from renewable sources by 2025 and be carbon negative by 2030, it said.