Sudanese Police Clash with Protesters at Ansar Sect’s Stronghold

A Sudanese man working at a bakery. (AFP)
A Sudanese man working at a bakery. (AFP)
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Sudanese Police Clash with Protesters at Ansar Sect’s Stronghold

A Sudanese man working at a bakery. (AFP)
A Sudanese man working at a bakery. (AFP)

Protests over the hike in prices and bread subsidy cuts continued in Sudan for the fifth day in a row.

In the Wad Nubawi neighborhood in the city of Omdurman, worshipers and protesters clashed for several hours with security services near al-Sayed Abdulrahman Mosque.

The mosque is one of the strongholds of the Ansar religious sect of the National Umma Party (NUP), which is led by Former Prime Minister al-Sadiq al-Mahdi.

Meanwhile, worshipers at Al-Ansar mosque in Rabak, capital of the White Nile State, also demonstrated along with residents of the Burri neighborhood, eastern Khartoum.

Witnessed told Asharq Al-Awsat that worshipers at al-Sayed Abdulrahman Mosque took part in a protest after Friday prayers, and the police and the security services confronted them with tear gas and batons in an attempt to disperse them.

Imam of the mosque Mohammed al-Hiwar Mohammed, who is the secretary of advocacy and guidance in the Ansar group, condemned the regime’s excessive use of violence against the protesters. He called during his Friday sermon at the mosque for the release of detainees and freedom of peaceful expression for citizens.

He described as a “legitimate duty” the demonstrators’ calls for a change in the “tyrannical” regime.

“Failing to defend the right to freedom and dignity and defending injustice and tyranny will lead to the elimination of nations and erosion of values,” he added.

Al-Sayed Abdulrahman Mosque is one of the strongholds of Mahdi’s Ansar group and the country's largest religious sect, whose followers belong to the NUP, one of Sudan’s main opposition parties.

Earlier this week, Mahdi had called on the Sudanese opposition alliance to join his party and supporters to confront President Omar al-Bashir's regime and to oust him through peaceful means.



Egypt Needs to Import $1.18 Billion in Fuel to End Power Cuts, PM Says

The moon is seen after the day of Strawberry Moon over old houses in Cairo, Egypt, June 22, 2024. (Reuters)
The moon is seen after the day of Strawberry Moon over old houses in Cairo, Egypt, June 22, 2024. (Reuters)
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Egypt Needs to Import $1.18 Billion in Fuel to End Power Cuts, PM Says

The moon is seen after the day of Strawberry Moon over old houses in Cairo, Egypt, June 22, 2024. (Reuters)
The moon is seen after the day of Strawberry Moon over old houses in Cairo, Egypt, June 22, 2024. (Reuters)

Egypt needs to import around $1.18 billion worth of mazut fuel oil and natural gas to end persistent power cuts exacerbated by consecutive heat waves, its Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouly said in a televised address on Tuesday.

It hopes the shipments will arrive in full around the third week of July, by which point the government aims to stop cutting power during the remaining summer months, he added.

It has already started contracting for 300,000 tons of mazut worth $180 million to boost its strategic reserves which are expected to arrive early next week.

Egypt's government on Monday extended daily power cuts to three hours from two hours previously in response to a surge in domestic electricity consumption during the latest heat wave.

These three-hour cuts will continue until the end of June, before returning to two hours in the first half of July with the aim of stopping completely for the rest of the summer, Madbouly said on Tuesday.

Egyptian social media has lit up with complaints about the impact of the blackouts, with some saying they have been forced to purchase private power generators.

The problem has particularly affected teenagers preparing for the crucial high school certificate, with some posting about students studying by candlelight and others in coffee shops.

A wedding hall owner in the coastal city of Port Said said he would turn one of his ballrooms into a study hall.

Since July last year, load shedding linked to falling gas production, rising demand and a shortage of foreign currency has led to scheduled two-hour daily power cuts in most areas.

"We had said that we planned to end load shedding by the end of 2024... we do not have a power generation problem or a network problem, we are unable to provide fuel," Madbouly said on Tuesday.

"With the increase in consumption related to the major development and population increase, there has been a lot of pressure on our dollar resources," he added.

He said production in a neighboring country's gas field had come to a full halt for 12 hours leading to an interruption in the supply, without naming the country or the gas field.

Egypt's Abu Qir Fertilizers said on Tuesday three of its plants had halted production because their supply of natural gas was cut.