Russia: We Do Not Recognize One-Sided US Sanctions

Russian deputy Foreign Minister Igor Morgulov. (AFP)
Russian deputy Foreign Minister Igor Morgulov. (AFP)
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Russia: We Do Not Recognize One-Sided US Sanctions

Russian deputy Foreign Minister Igor Morgulov. (AFP)
Russian deputy Foreign Minister Igor Morgulov. (AFP)

Russian deputy Foreign Minister Igor Morgulov announced on Friday that Moscow only recognizes sanctions adopted by the United Nations Security Council and therefore is no obligated to carry out sanctions set by Washington.

“We don’t recognize one-sided American sanctions, we have no international obligations to comply with them,” the RIA news agency quoted Morgulov as saying.

Such sanctions include those on North Korea.

Morgulov also said Russia would not expel North Korean citizens who are subject to US sanctions, and the US special representative for North Korea had been invited to visit Moscow, RIA reported.

On Thursday, South Korea said there was mounting evidence that sanctions against North Korea are having an effect, with trade across the Chinese border with the north now virtually "frozen up."

The claim comes from South Korean Foreign Minister, Kang Kyung-Wha, who has been speaking to reporters on the fringes of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Kang welcomed a new wave of diplomacy with North Korea, which includes the two Koreas jointly competing in certain events at next month's Winter Olympics, which the south is hosting.

But the foreign minister emphasized that for sustained diplomatic progress to be made beyond the Olympics, North Korea needs to recognize its stance on nuclear weapons is "unacceptable " and has "to move away from that course .... find a different course and engage."

She said the south wants to see "some kind of a momentum" created as a result of the Olympic rapprochement, but warned "south-north relations cannot improve without some traction and advance on the nuclear front."



NATO Chief Says the Alliance Is Adapting Its Nuclear Arsenal to Security Threats

 NATO Secretary General, Jens Stoltenberg gives a press conference on the eve of a NATO Defense ministers meeting at the organization's headquarters in Brussels on June 12, 2024. (AFP)
NATO Secretary General, Jens Stoltenberg gives a press conference on the eve of a NATO Defense ministers meeting at the organization's headquarters in Brussels on June 12, 2024. (AFP)
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NATO Chief Says the Alliance Is Adapting Its Nuclear Arsenal to Security Threats

 NATO Secretary General, Jens Stoltenberg gives a press conference on the eve of a NATO Defense ministers meeting at the organization's headquarters in Brussels on June 12, 2024. (AFP)
NATO Secretary General, Jens Stoltenberg gives a press conference on the eve of a NATO Defense ministers meeting at the organization's headquarters in Brussels on June 12, 2024. (AFP)

In a rare reference to the Western nuclear arsenal, NATO chief Jens Stoltenberg on Wednesday highlighted the alliance's efforts to adapt its capabilities to current security threats, taking note of Russia latest nuclear rhetoric and drills.

Talking to reporters before a two-day NATO defense ministers' meeting in Brussels that will include a gathering of the alliance's nuclear planning group, he called nuclear weapons NATO's "ultimate security guarantee" and a means to preserve peace.

While it is well known that the US has deployed nuclear bombs to several locations in Europe, NATO rarely talks about these weapons publicly.

Discussing what he called "the ongoing adaptation" of NATO's nuclear arsenal, Stoltenberg said the Netherlands in June declared the first F-35 fighter jets ready to carry nuclear arms and said the US was modernizing its nuclear weapons in Europe.

He described increasing Russian activity around its nuclear capabilities. "What we have seen over the last years and months is a dangerous nuclear rhetoric from the Russian side.... We also see some more exercises, nuclear exercises on the Russian side," he said.

On Tuesday, Russia said its troops had started the second stage of drills to practice the deployment of tactical nuclear weapons alongside Belarusian troops after what Moscow said were threats from Western powers.

Since sending thousands of troops into Ukraine on Feb. 24 2022, Russian President Vladimir Putin has repeatedly said Moscow could use nuclear weapons to defend itself in extreme situations.

Russia accuses the US and its European allies of pushing the world to the brink of nuclear confrontation by giving Ukraine billions of dollars worth of weapons, some of which are being used against Russian territory.

Stoltenberg also referred also to the modernization of China's nuclear weapons, saying Beijing was expected to boost the number of nuclear missiles within a few years and many of them would be able to reach NATO territory.