Study on Palestinian Audiovisual Heritage

Study on Palestinian Audiovisual Heritage
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Study on Palestinian Audiovisual Heritage

Study on Palestinian Audiovisual Heritage

The Institute for Palestine Studies has recently released "The Palestinian Audiovisual Heritage: Origin, Dispersion, and Digital Preservation…Preliminary Studies and Future Aspirations" by Author Bashar Shamout.

In this book, the author seeks to shed light on the rich audiovisual heritage of Palestine "aiming at preserving it with modern techniques, and documenting the collective Palestinian memory facing constant threats amid the hard political and life conditions the Palestinian people live."

The book discusses the topic on three levels: The origin of the audiovisual materials, the places of different collections dispersed in many archives around the world, and how to access them, in addition to some technical fundamentals used in the field of digitization in order to provide help for the people working in this field in the Arab region.

In addition to the objective research based on the digital archival science, the book highlights some of the major causes linked to the nonstop and deliberate attempts of Israeli institutions to conceal the Palestinian identity, kill the collective memory of the Palestinian people, and dominate it.

It also objectively discusses the looting and loss of audiovisual materials in Beirut following the Israeli invasion in 1982. These materials are of great cultural and historical value, as they were inspired by the resistance journey of the Palestine Liberation Organization since its establishment.



Medieval Mummies 'Beyond Repair' after Dublin Church Fire

Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo
Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo
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Medieval Mummies 'Beyond Repair' after Dublin Church Fire

Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo
Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo

Five medieval mummies preserved in the crypt of a Dublin church have likely been damaged beyond repair by a fire and water used to douse the flames, a church official said on Wednesday.
The five sets of remains, preserved for hundreds of years in the crypt of the 11th century St. Michan's Church in central Dublin, include the remains of a crusader and are a tourist attraction in the city, Reuters reported.
An intruder broke into the crypt on Tuesday afternoon and started the fire and firefighters used water to put it out, the Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin, Michael Jackson, told RTE radio.
"The combination of fire and water have done significant damage to the mummies... I honestly don't know exactly what the extent of that is, but my fear like that of others is that the damage is irreparable," Jackson said.
The remains are due to be examined by experts from the National Museum of Ireland to see if anything can be salvaged, he said.
The vicar of the church, David Pierpoint, told RTE he thought the mummies were "beyond repair."