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Algeria’s Tebboune Seeks to Improve his Representation in New Parliament

Algeria’s Tebboune Seeks to Improve his Representation in New Parliament

Saturday, 19 September, 2020 - 08:45
Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune. Reuters file photo

Algerian authorities launched on Friday a campaign to promote constitutional reforms that were adopted by the parliament earlier this month.


A large meeting held in a hotel in the capital, Algiers, was attended by dozens of activists from associations and organizations concerned with social, cultural and sports activities.


It is widely expected for the “Associative Movement” to be the pillar of President Abdelmadjid Tebboune’s attempt to form a large bloc of loyalists in the new parliament, which will be the outcome of early elections after the referendum on the constitutional amendment.


Friday’s two-day “meeting of the elites and civil society youth” was attended by prominent figures from organizations known for their strong loyalty to former president Abdelaziz Bouteflika.


In their speeches during the event, activists praised the new constitution, saying it “opens the door for a new and modern state.”


Local organizations were requested by the government to promote the constitutional amendments and convince as much Algerians as possible to vote “yes” in the referendum scheduled for November 1.


Discussions focused on “guarantees provided by the constitution to eliminate corruption,” which is widely linked to the former ruling party.


Attendees sought to emphasize that the authorities seek through the new constitution to push Algeria into a corruption-free era.


According to observers, symbols of the Associative Movement had been the first to promote the constitutional amendment implemented by Bouteflika in 2016, and supported the 2008 and 2002 amendments as well.


Back then, Bouteflika only sought parliament’s approval, avoiding a referendum.


After taking office, Tebboune announced that the civil society will have a great influence in his five-year term (2019-2022).


He seemed indifferent to the parties supporting him, leaving the impression that the “presidential majority” guaranteed by the amended constitution would reflect on the parliament through the membership of activists in associations.


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