Questions Rise over Sarraj’s Visit to Turkey Days after Retracting Resignation

GNA head Fayez al-Sarraj. (AP file photo)
GNA head Fayez al-Sarraj. (AP file photo)
TT

Questions Rise over Sarraj’s Visit to Turkey Days after Retracting Resignation

GNA head Fayez al-Sarraj. (AP file photo)
GNA head Fayez al-Sarraj. (AP file photo)

Head of Libya’s Government of National Accord (GNA) Fayez al-Sarraj has kept mum over a recent surprise visit he made to Turkey, raising questions as to whether it was linked to his decision last week to retract his resignation.

Sarraj, who is still in Turkey, has not commented on reports that have linked the two developments together. The reports highlighted his secret meeting with Turkish head of intelligence Hakan Fidan.

Local Libyan media have criticized Sarraj for running the GNA from Turkey’s Istanbul, noting how he has avoided mentioning his whereabouts and official duties in all statements he has issued in the past two days.

Meanwhile, Speaker of the east-based Libyan parliament Aguila Saleh accused Turkey and other countries, as well as the Muslim Brotherhood, of seeking to diminish Egypt’s role in resolving the Libyan crisis.

Sources close to Saleh said he had met in Cairo on Sunday with senior Egyptian officials as part of the ongoing consultations between them to end the crisis.

He reiterated his support for the Cairo Declaration, describing it as a main basis for any possible future Libyan agreement.

Separately, acting head of the United Nations mission to Libya, Stephanie Williams, met in Istanbul on Saturday with Sarraj’s deputy, Ahmed Maiteeq. Talks focused on the upcoming Libyan Dialogue Forum that will be held in Tunisia on November 9.

Elsewhere, head of the pro-GNA High Council of State Khalid al-Mishri made a surprise visit to Qatar on Saturday where he met with its Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani.

Mishri paid the visit at the invitation of head of the Qatari Shura Council.

Talks focused on coordinating position on issues of common interest, said an official statement. They also tackled bilateral relations and the latest developments in Libya.



Iraq Says No Green Light to Turkish Operations in Kurdistan

Smoke billows from a Turkish strike on Iraq's Duhok. (Kurdish media)
Smoke billows from a Turkish strike on Iraq's Duhok. (Kurdish media)
TT

Iraq Says No Green Light to Turkish Operations in Kurdistan

Smoke billows from a Turkish strike on Iraq's Duhok. (Kurdish media)
Smoke billows from a Turkish strike on Iraq's Duhok. (Kurdish media)

Iraqi Foreign Minister Fuad Hussein said on Friday his country hasn’t given Türkiye the green light to carry out operations in the Iraqi Kurdistan Region.

In televised remarks, he said the Baghdad government needs to hold more “security discussions with Turkish officials, even though it recognizes that the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) is also an Iraqi problem.”

He added that the Turkish army has been deployed in some Iraqi territories since 1991.

The deployment will be discussed during meetings with Turkish officials that will be held soon, he revealed.

Previous discussions with Türkiye did not yield an agreement over the security file, continued the FM. Türkiye is tying its deployment to the presence of the PKK.

Given that the group is present in Iraq, then it must also be dealt with in an “Iraqi way,” he went on to say.

The Turkish military’s incursion of 40 kms inside Iraqi territory had sparked widespread political and popular uproar.

Iraq’s national security council convened to address the issue.

Spokesman of the armed forces Yahya Rasool said the council tackled the Turkish violations and interference in the joint Iraqi-Turkish border regions.

He stressed Baghdad’s rejection of the incursion and undermining of Iraq’s territorial integrity.

Türkiye must respect the principles of good neighborliness and work diplomatically with the Iraqi government and coordinate with it over any security issue, he added.

Iraqi Prime Minister Mohammed Shia al-Sudani had dispatched a delegation led by the national security council head to Kurdistan to discuss general affairs and come up with a unified position over Iraq’s sovereignty.