Queen Rania Urges Fair Distribution of Vaccines

Queen Rania of Jordan. File photo
Queen Rania of Jordan. File photo
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Queen Rania Urges Fair Distribution of Vaccines

Queen Rania of Jordan. File photo
Queen Rania of Jordan. File photo

Queen Rania of Jordan has stated that there is no reason why countries that have an excessive supply of vaccines can't donate their surplus to poorer states, as she called for fair distribution.

“We are all in a race against a pandemic, not against each other,” Queen Rania said, adding that any single country's inability to recover from this crisis could lead to instability and insecurity for all.

Her statements were made while participating virtually in the Warwick Economics Summit.

The Queen explained that while some wealthy countries have pre-ordered enough vaccine doses to immunize their populations three times over, "lower-income countries will at best only manage to vaccinate a tenth of their populations" this year.

“I see no reason why those who have excess supply can't donate their surplus to poorer countries, and I'm glad that some countries have committed to doing just that,” the Queen said.

"If we aren't motivated by moral or ethical responsibility, then at least we should be motivated to act from a global health standpoint," she added.

WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has expressed concern that more than three-quarters of vaccinations are in just 10 countries.

"Almost 130 countries, with 2.5 billion people, have yet to receive a single dose," he said.

Jordan’s Ministry of Health said that the death toll from the COVID-19 disease has reached 4,369 and the total number of infections rose to 333,855.

The novel coronavirus has killed at least 2,299,637 people since the outbreak emerged in China in December 2019, according to a tally from official sources compiled by AFP.

In addition, more than 120 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines were used in no less than 82 countries.



Sudan: Legal Experts Urge ICC to Dispatch Team to Probe War Crimes in Darfur

International Criminal Court (ICC) Persecutor Karim Khan (AFP)
International Criminal Court (ICC) Persecutor Karim Khan (AFP)
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Sudan: Legal Experts Urge ICC to Dispatch Team to Probe War Crimes in Darfur

International Criminal Court (ICC) Persecutor Karim Khan (AFP)
International Criminal Court (ICC) Persecutor Karim Khan (AFP)

The ICC Prosecutor Karim Khan urged civil society organizations to provide any evidence and material to aid an urgent investigation into allegations of war crimes and crimes against humanity in Sudan’s Darfur region.
“We’re asking national authority counterparts, State parties and non-State parties alike, to share any evidence... in relation to these profound allegations of international crimes that are increasingly emerging and cannot be ignored,” Khan said following an attack on the South Hospital in al-Fasher, the capital city of North Darfur province on Sunday.
In a statement on X, Khan said he was “particularly concerned by the ethnically motivated nature” of attacks on civilian populations, especially in the western Darfur region, asking people to provide evidence so the ICC could investigate further.
Legal expert Hatem Elias told Asharq Al-Awsat on Wednesday that “the Darfur file being investigated by the ICC is still open based on Security Council resolutions and previous court investigations that led to the charges against former President Omar al-Bashir, and a number of his aides.”
Elias said that previous Security Council resolutions granting the ICC the power to prosecute crimes against humanity “enabled the court to collect strong evidence confirming that crimes against humanity were committed in Darfur.”
For his part, legal expert and human rights activist El Moez Hadra told Asharq Al-Awsat that Khan’s appeal reveal that the ICC is interested to investigate the fresh attacks on al-Fasher and at the same time, continue to respect the 2005 Security Council resolution that referred the situation in Darfur to the ICC Prosecutor for investigations into allegations of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity.
“The ICC is currently questioning old and new suspects,” he said.
But the legal expert appealed to the ICC Prosecutor to form an international commission of inquiry that visits Sudan and provides its own evidence rather than just urge organizations to offer information.
Khan, as a public prosecutor, has the right to form an ICC commission tasked to collect factual evidence rather than ask for information from activists and human rights defenders, who are at risk and are being killed and detained by both warring sides in Sudan, Hadra affirmed.
He based his request on the well-known Security Council “Cassese Commission” that investigated war crimes in Darfur. The commission was led by the Italian Antonio Cassese and Egyptian Mohammed Fayek, who visited Darfur and wrote their own report on the situation in the country, the expert explained.
Hadra said Khan’s appeal for organizations to provide the court with evidence is “useless.”
“It’s not going to help the court because evidence is lost over time and witnesses are moving to other places... It is important to send an ICC field team that has international protection,” Hadra said, adding that Sudanese teams and lawyers are getting killed while investigating war crimes in the country.