Zara Owner Inditex Set to Benefit from Higher Prices

A man walks past a Zara retail store, with its shutters drawn, at a mall in Caracas September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins/File Photo
A man walks past a Zara retail store, with its shutters drawn, at a mall in Caracas September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins/File Photo
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Zara Owner Inditex Set to Benefit from Higher Prices

A man walks past a Zara retail store, with its shutters drawn, at a mall in Caracas September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins/File Photo
A man walks past a Zara retail store, with its shutters drawn, at a mall in Caracas September 30, 2014. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins/File Photo

Fashion giant Zara's owner Inditex is expected to report bumper first-quarter earnings next week, benefiting from raising prices more than rivals without damaging its sales, analysts said.

As a cost of living crisis intensifies across the region, Europe's retailers are facing a tricky balancing act between passing on rising supply chain costs to consumers and ensuring that their products stay affordable.

The Russia-Ukraine conflict and COVID-19 lockdowns in China have added to pressures. But Inditex, best-known for the fast-to-market Zara brand which provides 71% of its sales, has staged a faster recovery than most, Reuters quoted analysts as saying.

The company was still well-placed to take market share because its prices remained competitive and consumers liked its rapid output of new fashion lines, RBC analyst Richard Chamberlain said in a research note.

"We expect Inditex's sales outperformance to widen in a downturn, as it did in the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009," he said. "Consumers that have been stuck at home for two years are looking to replenish their wardrobes."

Zara has lifted its starting prices by 10% or more from a year ago each month since January, according to UBS research. In April, its starting prices rose by an average 18.5%, the data showed. The research monitors prices on Zara's websites across 12 key markets.

In contrast, average retail prices across European apparel brands, including its closest rivals H&M and Zalando, rose 4.2% in April, the research showed. Euro zone inflation was at a record high of 7.4% that month, according to the European Union's statistics agency.

Inditex reports first quarter results on June 8. Analysts are expecting a 93% rise in net profit to 812 million euros ($866 million), according to Refinitiv data. Sales are expected to rise by 27% to 6.2 billion euros. Last year's performance was affected by store closures during the pandemic.

Inditex halted operations in Russia, closing online operations and 502 shops after Moscow's invasion of Ukraine and the imposition of Western sanctions. The Russian market accounted for 5% of its sales growth from Feb. 1 to March 13 this year, the company said.



Paris Fashion Week highlights: Teddies, Kids and a Phone Ban

A Ronaldo jersey becomes a dress at Vetements. MIGUEL MEDINA / AFP
A Ronaldo jersey becomes a dress at Vetements. MIGUEL MEDINA / AFP
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Paris Fashion Week highlights: Teddies, Kids and a Phone Ban

A Ronaldo jersey becomes a dress at Vetements. MIGUEL MEDINA / AFP
A Ronaldo jersey becomes a dress at Vetements. MIGUEL MEDINA / AFP

Paris Fashion Week, which runs until Tuesday, has seen no shortage of eye-catching moments this week. Here are a few highlights.
No phones?!?
OMG! Fashionistas at The Row's show were told they were not allowed to use their beloved phones, meaning entire minutes of their lives would go unrecorded on Instagram.
The label of TV star sisters Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen instead offered guests a notebook and pencil to record their impressions the old-fashioned way.
Chloe's new mama
There was a rare moment of spontaneity and family love at Chloe, where German designer Chemena Kamali made her debut with a collection that returned to the 1970s heyday of the house.
When Kamali came to take the customary bow at the end of the show, her five-year-old son couldn't resist running onto the catwalk for a hug in front of the ranks of fashion elite. Surprised and delighted, Kamali took him in her arms before quickly passing him back to dad and rushing backstage.
PETA's Beckham protest
PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) disrupted Victoria Beckham's show on Friday, with slogans including "Viva Vegan Leather" and "Animals Aren't Fabric" before being bundled quickly off the catwalk.
Teddy Boy
Vetements, the subversive brand launched in 2014, vowed its latest show was the one "you've been waiting for for 10 years", and drew attention with hugely oversized suits and a Ronaldo jersey turned into a dress.
One crazy look was a coat made of teddy bears. Was creative director Guram Gvasalia having a dig at his estranged brother Demna, who quit the brand to work for Balenciaga and had a huge controversy around an ad campaign featuring BDSM teddy bears?
Perhaps, though Vogue pointed out it was a direct copy from Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, who made a similar coat for Madonna.
Highland Sam Smith
British popstar Sam Smith made a surprise appearance on the catwalk for Vivienne Westwood in a very short and rather revealing tartan kilt under a red shawl.
The "Unholy" singer, known for daring red carpet outfits, re-emerged later in a long shredded black coat over a polka-dot top.
Casablanca up in arms
Charaf Tajer's label, which joined Paris Fashion Week last year, has built a lot of hype with its luxury sportswear.
Its second show, named after 90s Bjork hit "Venus as a Boy", introduced more stylish nightwear -- ranging from a blood-red cocktail dress to a semi-sheer rhinestone blouse to a pearl-encrusted mini-dress -- and played with imagery from Ancient Greece including laurels, pottery and sandals.
But in the ring of the Winter Circus, the clothes were almost overshadowed by an incredible troupe of synchronized arm dancers in the background.
DVN's 'audacious everyday'
Known for meticulous craftsmanship, Belgium's Dries Van Noten presented another eclectic collection that spawned a possible new trend tag from WWD: "audacious everyday" has apparently replaced last year's "quiet luxury".
Deconstructed sweaters turned into wraparound shawls, kimono-like coats, big furry shorts and bags -- in a pastel range of pink, aniseed green and butter yellow -- the collection sought a balance between stylish restraint and exciting statement.
Raining on Hermes
It was a rainy week in Paris, and Hermes brought the wet indoors, too, with a curtain of rain pouring down through the middle of the catwalk.
The collection, "midway between equestrianism and motorbikes" according to creative director Nadege Vanhee, offered luxurious ways to keep dry.

Biker-style jackets and tight-fitting coats with wool sleeves. Others featured rocker-style rivets or ostrich feathers, all in a narrow palette of burgundy, green, black and grey.


Paris Fashion Week: Valentino Puts on Opulent Study in Black, as McGirr Unveils McQueen Debut

 A model wears a creation as part of the Valentino Fall/Winter 2024-2025 ready-to-wear collection presented Sunday, March 3, 2024 in Paris. (AP)
A model wears a creation as part of the Valentino Fall/Winter 2024-2025 ready-to-wear collection presented Sunday, March 3, 2024 in Paris. (AP)
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Paris Fashion Week: Valentino Puts on Opulent Study in Black, as McGirr Unveils McQueen Debut

 A model wears a creation as part of the Valentino Fall/Winter 2024-2025 ready-to-wear collection presented Sunday, March 3, 2024 in Paris. (AP)
A model wears a creation as part of the Valentino Fall/Winter 2024-2025 ready-to-wear collection presented Sunday, March 3, 2024 in Paris. (AP)

The gilded salons of a grand 18th-century townhouse were the hallowed venue for Valentino’s latest fashion display on Sunday – an ode to black. This monochromatic collection gleamed and glistened under crystal chandeliers amid myriad textures and materials, inspired by great artists such as the French master of black, Pierre Soulages

Moons away, in the shadowy expanse of an icy-cold industrial warehouse crisscrossed by disused iron tracks and raw concrete surfaces, Alexander McQueen’s shivering guests huddled under blankets, buzzing with an air of electric anticipation. Because this wasn’t just another fashion show: it marked the first page of a new chapter for a house steeped in an iconoclastic history — and the debut of new creative director Sean McGirr.

Here are some highlights of fall-winter ready-to-wear collections:

VALENTINO’S NOIR Designer Pierpaolo Piccioli said he “approached black as a canvas, a starting point on which to build ... silhouettes that could move while looking for lights around, to soak them in and reflect them.”

The couturier was fascinated by the color’s contradictions — used for uniform and individuality, representing sobriety and exuberance, lacking light yet soaking up reflections. It evoked the philosophy of Soulages, who died in 2022.

Thus, with a tinge of Valentino’s 1980s heyday and glamor, all-black looks sauntered by as daywear and evening merged indistinguishably owing to the color’s intense allure.

Signature house looks were reimagined with a modern flair — think a voluminous black rosette adorning a sleeve, or the delicate tease of skin beneath tiered silk, not to mention sporty A-line skirts accented with tubular ruffles.

Though feathers, leathers, sequins, and lace provided subtle textural tensions, they did not provide enough of a lift to stop the collection from falling into the perennial danger of such one color-themed shows: Feeling one-note.

Nevertheless, the series of gowns that ended collection were a sublime study in chicness, such as one exquisite sheer chiffon floor-sweeping gown. Delicate baubles peppered poetically around it like a constellation of black stars.

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN’S NEW BEGINNINGS The pressure was palpable for McGirr, the relatively unknown 35-year-old Dublin-born designer, to unveil in this debut a vision and identity after 14 illustrious years of Sarah Burton. Burton, who parted ways with McQueen last season, had woven her narrative into the brand’s darkly romantic ethos after its visionary founder’s sudden, tragic death, leaving big shoes to fill.

Tagged “Rough opulence” and intent on “unveiling the animal within,” McGirr’s first foray resonated with the core tenets laid down by Alexander McQueen: a fusion of Gothic allure, a provocation, an ode to historical fashion, and the brand’s hallmark of dramatic tailoring.

The show unfurled with a model emerging from the shadows in a sinisterly twisted black laminated dress that seemed to swallow her hands whole — a striking image of constriction that reappeared throughout the collection. This binding theme was echoed in cords winding around slim-legged jeans and robust boots morphing into horses' hooves, trailing tails, and ominous broad leather coats.

However, designs occasionally verged on the overly obvious, with pattered historic Renaissance sleeve gowns and bulky “car tire”-like knitwear lacking the subtlety associated with his predecessor. Though the collection sparkled with promising moments of audacity, McGirr prioritized a play-it-safe approach over the risk of a misstep by pushing the envelope. This debut may have benefitted from being presented in a less pressurized, lower-octane, and more intimate format.

Nonetheless, amid the collection’s somber reflections, a surprising undercurrent of delight and whimsy surfaced, most notably through the stirring melody of his compatriot Enya’s “Sail Away” filling the air. It infused the space with a buoyant optimism subtly echoed in McGirr’s oft-playful creations.


Biker Boots and Curtains of Rain at Hermes Runway Show in Paris

Models present creations by Hermes for the Women Ready-to-wear Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection as part of the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris on March 2, 2024. (Photo by JULIEN DE ROSA / AFP)
Models present creations by Hermes for the Women Ready-to-wear Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection as part of the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris on March 2, 2024. (Photo by JULIEN DE ROSA / AFP)
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Biker Boots and Curtains of Rain at Hermes Runway Show in Paris

Models present creations by Hermes for the Women Ready-to-wear Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection as part of the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris on March 2, 2024. (Photo by JULIEN DE ROSA / AFP)
Models present creations by Hermes for the Women Ready-to-wear Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection as part of the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris on March 2, 2024. (Photo by JULIEN DE ROSA / AFP)

Hermes designer Nadege Vanhee added country and western flair to her fall/winter collection, sending biker boots and studded leather jackets down a catwalk lined with curtains of rain.
Models marched past the falling droplets parading the sleek lineup of leather ensembles that included flat, high-waisted trousers, flared in a boot-cut and worn with sharp-toed ankle boots - cowboy style.
Slit pencil skirts paired with trim bomber jackets looked youthful while cinched trench coats carried a more traditional flavor.
Show notes referred to "braving the elements", and cited resilient leathers, robust twills and supple cashmere.
For her bow, Vanhee lifted her arms and wiggled to the thumping soundtrack - Romeo Void's "Never Say Never" - as audience applauded.
Paris Fashion Week runs through March 5, featuring runway shows from some of the industry's biggest names, including LVMH's Louis Vuitton and Dior, Kering labels Saint Laurent and Balenciaga, and Chanel.


Leather at Acne Studios, Shaggy Coats at Dries Van Noten for Paris Fashion Week

A model presents a creation by designer Dries Van Noten as part of his Fall-Winter 2024/2025 Women's ready-to-wear collection show during Paris Fashion Week in Paris, France, February 28, 2024. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
A model presents a creation by designer Dries Van Noten as part of his Fall-Winter 2024/2025 Women's ready-to-wear collection show during Paris Fashion Week in Paris, France, February 28, 2024. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
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Leather at Acne Studios, Shaggy Coats at Dries Van Noten for Paris Fashion Week

A model presents a creation by designer Dries Van Noten as part of his Fall-Winter 2024/2025 Women's ready-to-wear collection show during Paris Fashion Week in Paris, France, February 28, 2024. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes
A model presents a creation by designer Dries Van Noten as part of his Fall-Winter 2024/2025 Women's ready-to-wear collection show during Paris Fashion Week in Paris, France, February 28, 2024. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes

For his fall/winter runway presentation, Acne Studios creative director Jonny Johansson showed slick, all leather looks and long, tailored jackets on Wednesday at Paris Fashion Week.
The collection was "rooted in toughness and human form, leather and denim," said the show notes, affixed to each seat.
"A celebration of uncompromising femininity." Leather bodysuits had high necks and voluminous sleeves and were left unzipped in the back, while floor-sweeping trench coats were tightly fitted.
Softening the lineup were all-white looks, including a long gown with buttons running down to the navel as well as an earth-coloured dress worn with a thick, furry scarf.
Dries Van Noten, who showed earlier on Wednesday, also featured thick scarves in his catwalk show, including one with sparkles that framed the model's head like a pillow.
The Puig-owned label's lineup came in pastels, grey and light browns, and included coats and bomber jackets with rounded shoulders, as well as tailored suits embellished with shimmery beadwork.
"It’s the way that he drapes, it’s the way that he styles, it’s the way that he designs these clothes — there’s always a woman in mind," said fashion commentator Hanan Besovic, known for his Instagram account @ideservecouture.
French-Moroccan creative director Charaf Tajer also held a runway show on Wednesday, for his label Casablanca's collection called "Venus as a Boy."
Held in the historic Paris Bouglione circus house, models walked the circular runway showcasing sporty tracksuits, cheerleader skirts and sheer, fitted skirts with slits.
Paris Fashion Week runs through March 5, with upcoming shows from Chanel, Hermes, Kering-owned Balenciaga and LVMH's Louis Vuitton.


Maria Grazia Chiuri Draws on Origins of Dior’s Ready-to-Wear Line for Show

 A model presents a creation by Christian Dior for the Women Ready-to-wear Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection as part of the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris on February 27, 2024. (AFP)
A model presents a creation by Christian Dior for the Women Ready-to-wear Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection as part of the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris on February 27, 2024. (AFP)
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Maria Grazia Chiuri Draws on Origins of Dior’s Ready-to-Wear Line for Show

 A model presents a creation by Christian Dior for the Women Ready-to-wear Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection as part of the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris on February 27, 2024. (AFP)
A model presents a creation by Christian Dior for the Women Ready-to-wear Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection as part of the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris on February 27, 2024. (AFP)

For her fall-winter collection, Dior designer Maria Grazia Chiuri turned to the roots of the upscale fashion label's ready-to-wear line, drawing on the spirit of the late 60s with feminine, tailored looks sent down the runway on Tuesday.

Models marched around a room lined with thick bamboo canes, parading neatly belted trench coats, flared miniskirts, long mesh dresses sparkling with beadwork and trim jackets. Handbags came in all shapes and sizes, as did the shoes, which included tall riding boots, scrunched at the top.

The challenge for Dior, when its late designer Marc Bohan branched out from intricately-crafted haute couture styles into ready-to-wear designs, was to create a new silhouette, easier for women to slip on as they ventured into the work force, Chiuri told Reuters before the show.

"I think that Mr. Bohan understood very well this new generation," said Chiuri.

"At the time it was very unusual for a couture house to move into new territory," she added, also noting Bohan's foray into homewear designed by Italian artist Gabriella Crespi.

Graphics from the era, introducing the new line dubbed "Miss Dior", appeared on the clothing as starkly outlined paintstrokes on khaki-colored coats and split skirts.

Dominating the center of the space were elaborate armor-like sculptures made of cane, works by Indian artist Shakuntala Kulkarni evoking rounded, female shapes, their rigidity contrasting with the slightly loosened, polished looks shown on the catwalk.

Paris Fashion Week runs through March 5, with upcoming shows from Chanel, Hermes, Kering-owned Saint Laurent and Balenciaga and LVMH's Louis Vuitton.


Twinning Outfits Not a Fashion Faux Pas in Milan

Logos are on display outside the Gucci show at Milan Fashion Week. Marco BERTORELLO / AFP
Logos are on display outside the Gucci show at Milan Fashion Week. Marco BERTORELLO / AFP
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Twinning Outfits Not a Fashion Faux Pas in Milan

Logos are on display outside the Gucci show at Milan Fashion Week. Marco BERTORELLO / AFP
Logos are on display outside the Gucci show at Milan Fashion Week. Marco BERTORELLO / AFP

You enter a room and - gasp! - someone across from you is wearing the same outfit.
Relax, it happens. It's Milan Fashion Week and guests have sported the same outfits in runway shows running from Wednesday to Sunday, AFP said.
More than 50 catwalk shows on the women's Fall/Winter 2024-2025 calendar from Diesel and Dolce & Gabbana to Gucci and Versace draw guests from all over the world but many of them end up looking near identical.
At Fendi on the opening day, two influencers from Dubai stood toe-to-toe chatting and wearing the exact same animal print lace-up boots.
Meanwhile, the color-block print shirt adorned with the Fendi logo that 29-year-old Fatma Husam sported was the one chosen by multiple other women.
Did that bother her?
"It's completely normal," Husam said. "Because after all, how many clothes do these brands make anyway?"
Her friend, Deema Alasadi, 35, agreed.
"At a party I would be a bit busted, but at Fashion Week it's totally normal."
Japanese musicians Aya and Ami, known collectively as Amiaya, took it to the next level as only twins can with matching cherry red bob hairstyles and identical high black Fendi boots with gold heels.
Later Wednesday at Roberto Cavalli, a blonde woman in a long flowy gown printed with lemons from designer Fausto Puglisi's 2024 Resort collection smiled coyly for the cameras.
Nearby, another guest pouted and posed in a bodysuit sewn of cheetah fabric -- a mainstay of the brand -- that left little to the imagination.
But those are not the only lemons and animal prints in the room.
'Herd instinct'
Luxury brands personally dress the A-list celebrities who attend their fashion shows in up-to-the-minute looks -- such as the all-black-clad Uma Thurman and Sharon Stone at Tom Ford Thursday night -- making sure not to duplicate looks in the front rows.
But influencers -- who are sometimes sent the most coveted "it" items by the labels -- and other guests are left to rummage through their own closets, making duplications from past seasons inevitable.
But the devil is in the details, said Husam at the Fendi show.
"Everyone may be wearing the same pieces, but styling them differently," she said.
Copycat looks are most obvious when it comes to brands with in-your-face logos, such as Gucci and Versace, but harder to detect with those taking a subtler approach, such as Prada and Armani.
It is common among fashion editors who attend shows, said Godfrey Deeny, global editor-in-chief of FashionNetwork.com.
"If you're an editor you're always looking for the new, but you also have a herd instinct that you want everyone to know you know what the new thing is," he said.
"So you c
Many in the industry take comfort, he said, in knowing that "when you go, you'll all be wearing the same absurd sneaker."
Of course when it comes to the brand's employees, security guards and ushers at fashion shows, it is standard to wear the same thing: black.


Puma Sees Softer First Half as Currency Effects Weigh 

The logo of German sports goods firm Puma is seen at the entrance of one of its stores in Vienna, Austria, March 18, 2016. (Reuters)
The logo of German sports goods firm Puma is seen at the entrance of one of its stores in Vienna, Austria, March 18, 2016. (Reuters)
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Puma Sees Softer First Half as Currency Effects Weigh 

The logo of German sports goods firm Puma is seen at the entrance of one of its stores in Vienna, Austria, March 18, 2016. (Reuters)
The logo of German sports goods firm Puma is seen at the entrance of one of its stores in Vienna, Austria, March 18, 2016. (Reuters)

Puma on Tuesday said it expects a soft first half of 2024 as negative currency effects continue to put pressure on the German sportswear company, but stuck to the annual targets it gave in January.

"Going into 2024, we see that the market environment remains challenging," CEO Arne Freundt said in a statement.

In the fourth quarter of 2023, Puma's currency-adjusted sales in the Americas fell by 6.4% to 846 million euros ($918.5 million), hit by a slump in the value of the Argentine peso, the sportswear maker said.

Revenue in the Asia-Pacific rose 2.8% on a currency-adjusted basis to 468.3 million euros in the quarter, helped by strong growth in the Greater China region and India, Puma said.

However, it flagged sales in the rest of Asia were softer, impacted by consumer sentiment and warm weather conditions.

The group reiterated its 2024 projection for mid-single-digit percentage growth in currency-adjusted sales, and earnings before interest and tax of 620 million to 700 million euros.


Christian Dior Postpones Much Anticipated Hong Kong Show 

Logos of Dior brand are seen outside a Dior store in Paris, France, March 3, 2017. (Reuters)
Logos of Dior brand are seen outside a Dior store in Paris, France, March 3, 2017. (Reuters)
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Christian Dior Postpones Much Anticipated Hong Kong Show 

Logos of Dior brand are seen outside a Dior store in Paris, France, March 3, 2017. (Reuters)
Logos of Dior brand are seen outside a Dior store in Paris, France, March 3, 2017. (Reuters)

French fashion label Christian Dior has postponed its planned mega fashion show in Hong Kong due to be held in March, the government said on Monday, without giving a reason for the decision.

The event was widely anticipated by many in the luxury sector after a high profile show from Louis Vuitton helmed by singer Pharrell Williams last November, which was an attempt to put the Chinese city back on the luxury map and attract wealthy spenders.

Dior did not immediately respond to Reuters requests for comment on why it postponed the show.

"We have just received notification from the organizer that the event will be postponed. In fact, postponements of large-scale events often happen. We continue to welcome large-scale events to be held in Hong Kong," the government said in an email.

Hong Kong's luxury retailers are adapting to fewer wealthy Chinese shoppers visiting the city and a shift towards tourists flocking to Instagram-coveted spots in trendy districts rather than splashing out on pricey branded gear.

Before the pandemic, the Chinese special administrative region had bucked global trends of declining demand for multi-brand department stores and ultra-luxury brands largely due to its attractiveness to high-spending mainland visitors.

But the rise of competing shopping hubs like China's Hainan island, changing consumer preferences and a rise in online shopping have fundamentally changed demand for luxury goods in Hong Kong and are starting to reshape the city's visitor economy, according to industry experts.


Giorgio Armani Catwalk Blooms with Florals at Milan Fashion Week

A model presents a creation from the Giorgio Armani Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection at Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, February 25, 2024. REUTERS/Claudia Greco
A model presents a creation from the Giorgio Armani Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection at Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, February 25, 2024. REUTERS/Claudia Greco
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Giorgio Armani Catwalk Blooms with Florals at Milan Fashion Week

A model presents a creation from the Giorgio Armani Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection at Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, February 25, 2024. REUTERS/Claudia Greco
A model presents a creation from the Giorgio Armani Fall-Winter 2024/2025 collection at Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, February 25, 2024. REUTERS/Claudia Greco

Florals bloomed on the catwalk at Giorgio Armani on Sunday, adorning winter outfits and accessories as the veteran Italian designer presented his latest collection for his main line at Milan Fashion Week.
Armani, affectionately known as King Giorgio in Italy, opened the autumn/winter 2024 womenswear show, called "Winter Flowers", with fluid looks in light grey and brown - jackets and trousers, accessorized with floral blue scarves or sashes.
The floral theme was omnipresent in the show with floral prints or embroidery adorning jackets, dresses, blouses, hats and bags.
Floral prints or embroidery in pink, blue and green added color to dark creations in blue or black.
"The flowers are a sign of a better season coming and I really liked the contrast - there are no flowers in winter, I created them," Armani, 89, told reporters.
For the evening, sequined floral embroidery shimmered on jackets, sheer tops and dresses.
Armani closed the show with a selection of strapless frocks with sparkling flower decorations.
The designer presented the latest collection for his second line, Emporio Armani, on Thursday.


Dolce & Gabbana Play with the Tuxedo for Womenswear at Milan Fashion

A model presents a creation from the Dolce & Gabbana Fall/Winter 2024 collection during Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, February 24, 2024. (Reuters)
A model presents a creation from the Dolce & Gabbana Fall/Winter 2024 collection during Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, February 24, 2024. (Reuters)
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Dolce & Gabbana Play with the Tuxedo for Womenswear at Milan Fashion

A model presents a creation from the Dolce & Gabbana Fall/Winter 2024 collection during Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, February 24, 2024. (Reuters)
A model presents a creation from the Dolce & Gabbana Fall/Winter 2024 collection during Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, February 24, 2024. (Reuters)

Dolce & Gabbana offered an array of looks inspired by the tuxedo at Milan Fashion Week on Saturday, where the Italian luxury label presented a mainly black womenswear collection for next fall.

The autumn/winter 2024 show, called "Tuxedo", opened with cropped jackets and tied skirts slit at the front, followed by outfits and coats inspired by the formal wear.

Models wore sashes with knee-length shorts or cigarette trousers, halternecks and waistcoats inspired by tuxedo jackets and embroidered lace dresses.

Designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana put bows on black sheer blouses as well as shoes, sometimes sparkling.

The looks were mainly all in black, with dabs of leopard print, a few shimmering silver creations and a chiffon blouse and dress adorned in large gold polka dot prints.

Models, including Naomi Campbell, wore black hats with netted veils.

Earlier at Ferragamo, designer Maximilian Davis looked to the 1920s for inspiration, presenting dresses with dropped waistlines, feather embellishments or sequins.

Wool jackets and coats with broad shoulders were contrasted with organdie dresses and sheer skirts in the collection called "Spirit", and which featured autumnal hues, bright red, mustard and black. Footwear consisted of thigh-high boots, stilettos and shoes adorned with feathers.

"The 1920s used clothing as a way to celebrate freedom,” Davis said in show notes.

“And that expression of freedom is something which resonates with me, with my heritage, and with Ferragamo.”

Milan Fashion Week runs until Monday.