Five-Way Summit Anticipated in Egypt

The Egyptian President and his Emirati counterpart in New Alamein on Sunday (Egyptian Presidency)
The Egyptian President and his Emirati counterpart in New Alamein on Sunday (Egyptian Presidency)
TT

Five-Way Summit Anticipated in Egypt

The Egyptian President and his Emirati counterpart in New Alamein on Sunday (Egyptian Presidency)
The Egyptian President and his Emirati counterpart in New Alamein on Sunday (Egyptian Presidency)

Arab and regional observers have turned their eyes towards Egypt’s northwestern coastal city of New Alamein, where the North African state is expected to hold a five-way summit that will see the participation of leaders from Egypt, the UAE, Jordan, Bahrain, and Iraq.

Meanwhile, UAE President Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan held a summit in New Alamein with Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi on Sunday to discuss bilateral cooperation as well as a host of regional and international issues.

The two leaders also agreed during the summit on the importance of bolstering Arab joint efforts to confront common challenges facing the Arab World, Egypt's presidential spokesman Bassam Rady said in a statement.

They called for coordinated efforts to find long-term solutions to regional crises to bring about security, stability and peace for the region and its peoples, it added.

They also vowed to strengthen the strategic partnership between the two countries, especially on the economy and development, to support their aspirations towards achieving sustainable development, progress and prosperity, according to the statement.

Local Egyptian media, including the semi-official channel Extra News, quoted a source it described as “informed” that “the leaders of Egypt, the UAE, Jordan, Bahrain and Iraq will hold an upcoming summit in the city of New Alamein.”

However, the source did not specify the date.

Extra News reported that the quint summit will be held upon the invitation of Sisi and under the framework of coordination among nations.

The summit chiefly aims to serve common Arab work and promote Arab-Arab relations in the face of international and regional challenges.

In the past few months, meetings of several Arab leaders were held in different locations.

In June, Egypt, Bahrain, and Jordan agreed in a summit held in Sharm El-Sheikh on the importance of strengthening ties between the three nations to “the highest levels”, especially amid the international and regional challenges.

During the summit, Sisi said Egypt aspires to further cooperation with Bahrain and Jordan to achieve the common interests of the peoples of the three nations as well as boost joint Arab action, particularly amid great challenges of multiple regional and international developments.

The Bahraini and Jordanian kings praised "the inextricable" ties binding the three countries, stressing their keenness to elevate cooperation with Egypt to the level of strategic partnership.



Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
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Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)

Sudan's Rapid Support Forces agreed with the United Nations on some steps to ease aid delivery in areas under its control, a member of the RSF told Reuters on Thursday.

The Sudanese army has not reached any understandings on aid delivers with the RSF, he added. It is unclear if these steps could be implemented without the army's participation.

Meanwhile, a key supply route into Sudan's Darfur region, deemed at risk of famine by a global monitor, has been cut off due to heavy rains, a World Food Program official told Reuters on Thursday.
The UN agency has described Sudan as the world's biggest hunger crisis, with the western Darfur region most at risk as Sudan's 15-month civil war that has displaced millions and sparked ethnic violence grinds on.
WFP's Country Director Eddie Rowe said thousands of tons of aid are stranded at the Tina crossing on the Chad border, prompting the body to reopen talks with the army-aligned government to open an alternative, all-weather crossing further south called Adre.
"You have these huge rivers. As I speak now, our convoy, which is supposed to move over 2000 metric tons is stranded," he told Reuters from Port Sudan. Asked on the status of the talks that resumed this week, he said: "It's 50/50.”
WFP is now seeking clearances to move a large 70-truck convoy via a little-used, over 1000 kilometer route from Port Sudan to Darfur which Rowe said will involve crossing the battle lines of both the Sudan Armed Forces, the Rapid Support Forces and various militias.
He added that this mostly desert route has worked in the past but outside of the rainy season and that the last journey took weeks and was "fraught with a lot of challenges.”
In a separate interview, Mona Rishmawi, a member of the UN Fact-Finding Mission on Sudan, told Reuters that she had met Darfur refugees in Chad who told her stories of escaping with virtually no water and eating grass along the route. "There's no doubt that people are starving," she said.