Türkiye Says it Seeks to ‘Build Good Relations’ with Various Libyan Parties

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan received the Speaker of the Libyan House of Representatives, Aguila Saleh, and the Vice Presidential Council, Abdullah Al-Lafi, in August (Photo: Libyan Parliament)
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan received the Speaker of the Libyan House of Representatives, Aguila Saleh, and the Vice Presidential Council, Abdullah Al-Lafi, in August (Photo: Libyan Parliament)
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Türkiye Says it Seeks to ‘Build Good Relations’ with Various Libyan Parties

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan received the Speaker of the Libyan House of Representatives, Aguila Saleh, and the Vice Presidential Council, Abdullah Al-Lafi, in August (Photo: Libyan Parliament)
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan received the Speaker of the Libyan House of Representatives, Aguila Saleh, and the Vice Presidential Council, Abdullah Al-Lafi, in August (Photo: Libyan Parliament)

Türkiye has expressed willingness to build good relations with all Libyan parties, revealing its intention to send a parliamentary delegation to visit Tripoli and the east of the country.

Turkish Foreign Minister Melvut Cavusoglu said that his country sought to establish relations with various parties in Libya out of its keenness to achieve security and stability.

In press statements on Wednesday, he said: “Those, who were criticizing Türkiye’s presence in Libya have today praised the effective role it plays in this country, and started saying that Türkiye is a guarantor of security and stability there.”

Cavusoglu added that international relations were constantly changing, noting that Turkish foreign policy “adapts to changing circumstances, in line with its national interests.”

Ankara has been recently seeking to achieve a balance in its policy between western and eastern Libya, but adheres to supporting the Interim Government of National Unity, headed by Abdel Hamid Dbeibeh, against the Fathi Bashagha government.

Türkiye sought to bring the two sides together in a meeting last March, and hosted separate talks with Turkish officials earlier this month.

While Dbeibeh has publicly met with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, along with the defense and foreign ministers, and the Turkish intelligence chief, Bashagha and Ankara have not disclosed the level of the meetings recently held in Libya.

During his meeting with Dbeibeh, Erdogan stressed the need to preserve the security and safety of the Libyan capital from any military attempts or attacks. He added that change could only happen through elections.

Dbeibeh, for his part, said that the Turkish side underlined the need to hold elections under the supervision of his government, after which power would be handed over to the elected party.

He also noted that his meetings with Turkish officials focused on political, economic and military affairs.

On the other hand, Bashagha described his meetings with Turkish officials as positive. He pointed to the need to cooperate with all internal political bodies and forces, and with UN Envoy Abdullah Batali, to help the Libyan government carry out its tasks.

The visits of Bashagha and Dbeibeh to Turkey came after days of bloody clashes in Tripoli between forces affiliated with the unity government and others loyal to the Bashagha government, which resulted in the killing of 32 people, including civilians.

Reports said that the Turkish drones supplied to the Dbeibeh government had turned the clashes in the latter’s favor.



Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
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Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)

Sudan's Rapid Support Forces agreed with the United Nations on some steps to ease aid delivery in areas under its control, a member of the RSF told Reuters on Thursday.

The Sudanese army has not reached any understandings on aid delivers with the RSF, he added. It is unclear if these steps could be implemented without the army's participation.

Meanwhile, a key supply route into Sudan's Darfur region, deemed at risk of famine by a global monitor, has been cut off due to heavy rains, a World Food Program official told Reuters on Thursday.
The UN agency has described Sudan as the world's biggest hunger crisis, with the western Darfur region most at risk as Sudan's 15-month civil war that has displaced millions and sparked ethnic violence grinds on.
WFP's Country Director Eddie Rowe said thousands of tons of aid are stranded at the Tina crossing on the Chad border, prompting the body to reopen talks with the army-aligned government to open an alternative, all-weather crossing further south called Adre.
"You have these huge rivers. As I speak now, our convoy, which is supposed to move over 2000 metric tons is stranded," he told Reuters from Port Sudan. Asked on the status of the talks that resumed this week, he said: "It's 50/50.”
WFP is now seeking clearances to move a large 70-truck convoy via a little-used, over 1000 kilometer route from Port Sudan to Darfur which Rowe said will involve crossing the battle lines of both the Sudan Armed Forces, the Rapid Support Forces and various militias.
He added that this mostly desert route has worked in the past but outside of the rainy season and that the last journey took weeks and was "fraught with a lot of challenges.”
In a separate interview, Mona Rishmawi, a member of the UN Fact-Finding Mission on Sudan, told Reuters that she had met Darfur refugees in Chad who told her stories of escaping with virtually no water and eating grass along the route. "There's no doubt that people are starving," she said.