''Jellabiya''…Annual Top Fashion Trend in Ramadan

 Female shoppers seek to buy jellabiyas during Ramadan in historic Jeddah (Photo: Adnan Mahdali)
Female shoppers seek to buy jellabiyas during Ramadan in historic Jeddah (Photo: Adnan Mahdali)
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''Jellabiya''…Annual Top Fashion Trend in Ramadan

 Female shoppers seek to buy jellabiyas during Ramadan in historic Jeddah (Photo: Adnan Mahdali)
Female shoppers seek to buy jellabiyas during Ramadan in historic Jeddah (Photo: Adnan Mahdali)

Fashion designers compete every year to come out with designs that keep up with the trends. Known as “jellabiya” - this traditional garment has always been the top fashion choice in the Gulf and Islamic countries during the holy month of Ramadan, which caught the attention of most international fashion designers and urged them to incorporate it in their collections as a folkloric gown highly demanded by women.

Fashion designer and stylist Manal al-Judaibi said Ramadan in Saudi Arabia has a special significance with the unique rituals and the special traditions in every region. Saudi women are used to wear the Ramadan-inspired jellabiya, which has become a common feature that adds a lot of joy to their evenings.

“The jellabiyas of Ramadan come in different designs, cuts, and fabrics. The jellabiyas worn at home are often made of light cotton fabrics for more comfort, while the formal jellabiyas are styled to suit movement and work.

"Jellabiyas designed for work and occasions are usually made from special fabrics and accessories,” Al-Judaibi explained.

The stylist stressed that the body shape should be considered while choosing the cut and design of the jellabiya, which is supposed to give a more flattering look and conceal flaws.

“The jellabiya is still highly demanded despite being a traditional, historic garment. But today, it has a more modern design,” she noted, highlighting the high turnout on jellabiyas. Al-Judaibi also explained that this high demand on this garment is driven by the stylish designs that still manage to maintain the traditional touch and attract all generations.

She also noted that the Ramadan jellabiyas come with special embroideries and prints, mostly Islamic engravings and Arabic texts in a modern style, in addition to folkloric accessories with contemporary twist, noting that the linen fabric is one of the most used in jellabiyas, while Sadu is exclusive for Ramadan.

The Saudi stylist said colors should be chosen in line with trends and seasons. Summer, for example, is know for its vivid colors, while winter calls for warm colors. The chosen color must also fit the skin tone.

Meanwhile, amid the e-shopping boom around the world, many stores in Saudi Arabia have started selling their products online to facilitate shopping, and save time, effort, and cost, which urged many women to shop jellabiyas via Instagram pages and websites that offer them a wide variety of designs and colors, and a freer experience.



Japan Seeks More Visitors Despite Overtourism Woes

The municipality famous for Himeji Castle is reportedly mulling making the World Heritage site's admission fees for overseas tourists four times as expensive as those for local residents. CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP
The municipality famous for Himeji Castle is reportedly mulling making the World Heritage site's admission fees for overseas tourists four times as expensive as those for local residents. CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP
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Japan Seeks More Visitors Despite Overtourism Woes

The municipality famous for Himeji Castle is reportedly mulling making the World Heritage site's admission fees for overseas tourists four times as expensive as those for local residents. CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP
The municipality famous for Himeji Castle is reportedly mulling making the World Heritage site's admission fees for overseas tourists four times as expensive as those for local residents. CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP

Japan's tourism chief said Thursday its ambitious goal of luring 60 million foreign tourists a year -- more than double the current level -- is well within reach, despite surging overtourism concerns.
Japan last year attracted over 25 million tourists from abroad, in part buoyed by the lifting of pandemic-era border restrictions, from countries such as South Korea, Singapore and the United States, said AFP.
Ichiro Takahashi, head of Japan's tourism agency, acknowledged the previously announced target of 60 million remains "tough", but stressed it is within the realm of possibility.
"It is a figure that we can very much achieve by making the right efforts", Takahashi told a briefing in Tokyo.
"There are still many little-known places in Japan that are left unexplored by tourists from overseas -- I believe Japan has infinite tourism resources," Takahashi said.
Over three million foreign tourists visited Japan for a third consecutive month in May, according to government statistics released Wednesday.
But an influx of tourists to Japan has reignited concerns over overtourism in recent months, with local residents complaining of their sometimes unruly behavior and etiquette breaches.
The city of Himeji, in western Japan, was among the latest local governments to express frustrations.
The municipality famous for Himeji Castle is mulling making the World Heritage site's admission fees for overseas tourists four times as expensive as those for local residents, local media reported.
"A wooden structure will be worn out and become more brittle after many people climb up and down", mayor Hideyasu Kiyomoto told Japanese media, stressing the need to "curb overtourism".
Local citizens using the castle as a community hub shouldn't be charged the same amount as "people who only come here once in around 10 years for sightseeing purposes", he said.
Another flashpoint around overtourism is Mount Fuji, where a new, crowd-control gate was erected Monday along its popular trail.
The measure followed a rare step taken last month by an exasperated Japanese town to deliberately block a view of the volcano with a large black barrier, in a bid to deter photo-hungry tourists.