Man Becomes '10 years Younger' after 93 Days at Bottom of the Atlantic

His stem cell count had also skyrocketed - (The AP)
His stem cell count had also skyrocketed - (The AP)
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Man Becomes '10 years Younger' after 93 Days at Bottom of the Atlantic

His stem cell count had also skyrocketed - (The AP)
His stem cell count had also skyrocketed - (The AP)

Retired naval officer Joseph Dituri spent 93 days submerged in the Atlantic ocean and came out 10 years younger.

Dituri emerged from his 100-square-foot pod with extraordinary results.

Not only did he shatter the previous world record for underwater habitation, which was 73 days, but he had also turned back the ageing clock, emerging from his pod 10 years younger, The Mirror reported.

After returning to dry land, medical assessments revealed that Dituri's telomeres, the DNA caps at the ends of chromosomes that typically shrink with age, were 20 per cent longer than before his dive. His stem cell count had also skyrocketed, and his overall health metrics had undergone a remarkable transformation.

Dituri also experienced a significant improvement in sleep quality, with 60 to 66 percent of his nights now spent in deep REM sleep. His cholesterol levels plummeted by 72 points, and his inflammatory markers had been slashed in half. These transformations were attributed to the underwater pressure, which is known to have numerous positive effects on the body.



NASA Calls Off Astronauts' ISS Spacewalk Over 'Spacesuit Discomfort'

FILE PHOTO: The NASA logo is seen at Kennedy Space Center ahead of the NASA/SpaceX launch of a commercial crew mission to the International Space Station in Cape Canaveral, Florida, US, April 16, 2021. REUTERS/Joe Skipper/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: The NASA logo is seen at Kennedy Space Center ahead of the NASA/SpaceX launch of a commercial crew mission to the International Space Station in Cape Canaveral, Florida, US, April 16, 2021. REUTERS/Joe Skipper/File Photo
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NASA Calls Off Astronauts' ISS Spacewalk Over 'Spacesuit Discomfort'

FILE PHOTO: The NASA logo is seen at Kennedy Space Center ahead of the NASA/SpaceX launch of a commercial crew mission to the International Space Station in Cape Canaveral, Florida, US, April 16, 2021. REUTERS/Joe Skipper/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: The NASA logo is seen at Kennedy Space Center ahead of the NASA/SpaceX launch of a commercial crew mission to the International Space Station in Cape Canaveral, Florida, US, April 16, 2021. REUTERS/Joe Skipper/File Photo

NASA said a "spacesuit discomfort issue" forced the cancellation of a planned spacewalk outside the International Space Station (ISS) by two US astronauts on Thursday, roughly an hour before their repair mission was poised to begin.
NASA astronauts Tracy C. Dyson and Matt Dominick, two of the orbiting laboratory's six US astronauts, donned their spacesuits early on Thursday morning in preparation for a roughly six-hour trek outside the ISS for routine repairs and a science mission, as shown on a NASA live stream.
As other US crewmembers prepped the two astronauts inside the station's Quest airlock - the exit module separating the station's interior from the vacuum of space - NASA astronaut Mike Barratt asked flight controllers in Houston for a private communications line to discuss a medical issue.
Minutes later a NASA spokeswoman speaking on the live stream said "today's spacewalk will not be proceeding as planned."
"The spacewalk today, June 13, at the International Space Station did not proceed as scheduled due to a spacesuit discomfort issue," NASA later said on its website.
The spacewalk mission was poised to be NASA's 90th in the space station's 23-year history, and the second this year. It would have been the fourth spacewalk for Dixon, who first flew to space in 2007, and the first for Dominick.
It was not clear what caused the spacesuit discomfort or whether an independent astronaut medical issue was a factor, Reuters reported.
Past spacewalks have been called off over issues with the station's spacesuits, which were designed nearly half a century ago with only minor redesigns and refurbishments. NASA's inspector general has said they are ripe for an upgrade, which NASA is paying Raytheon's Collins Aerospace to do.
Before Thursday's spacewalk cancellation, NASA on Wednesday night accidentally broadcast on its live YouTube feed a simulated emergency of astronauts being treated for decompression sickness on the ISS, raising public alarm about the health of US crewmembers.
NASA said there was no real emergency and that "audio was inadvertently misrouted from an ongoing simulation where crew members and ground teams train for various scenarios in space and is not related to a real emergency."