Stone Projectiles that are Nearly 800 Years Old Found at Castle in Britain

English Heritage said the shots were fired in a siege of Kenilworth Castle in 1266 (English Heritage)
English Heritage said the shots were fired in a siege of Kenilworth Castle in 1266 (English Heritage)
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Stone Projectiles that are Nearly 800 Years Old Found at Castle in Britain

English Heritage said the shots were fired in a siege of Kenilworth Castle in 1266 (English Heritage)
English Heritage said the shots were fired in a siege of Kenilworth Castle in 1266 (English Heritage)

Eight 13th Century catapult shots have been discovered “perfectly preserved” outside the walls of a castle in Warwickshire, BBC reported on Tuesday.

English Heritage said the shots would have been fired during the siege of Kenilworth Castle in 1266, one of the longest sieges in English history when the country was in the grip of civil war.

The shots range between 1kg and 105kg in weight, with some being found just below the surface of the ground.

English Heritage said the discovery was made during a project to improve accessibility around Kenilworth Castle.

Will Wyeth, English Heritage’s properties historian, said: "We were able to immediately link these findings to the 1266 siege because of similar finds recovered in the 1960s.

“However, it’s not every day we get lucky enough to stumble across historical remains like this by chance.”

For a total of 172 days between June 25and December 13, 1266, Kenilworth Castle was under constant attack in one of the most significant military contests of Henry III’s reign.

The king’s conflict with his nobles had escalated into civil war some years prior.

“Imagine the surprise of the team when we unearthed these impressive stone projectiles that are nearly 800 years old,” Wyeth said.

“These would have caused some serious damage when fired from war machines,” he said. “In fact, records show that one of Henry III’s wooden siege towers, containing around 200 crossbowmen, was destroyed by just one well-aimed missile.”



Man Kills Grizzly Bear in Montana after it Attacks

FILE - US Highway 89 is shown near Gardiner, Mo., on July 15, 2020. (Brett French/Billings Gazette via AP)
FILE - US Highway 89 is shown near Gardiner, Mo., on July 15, 2020. (Brett French/Billings Gazette via AP)
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Man Kills Grizzly Bear in Montana after it Attacks

FILE - US Highway 89 is shown near Gardiner, Mo., on July 15, 2020. (Brett French/Billings Gazette via AP)
FILE - US Highway 89 is shown near Gardiner, Mo., on July 15, 2020. (Brett French/Billings Gazette via AP)

A 72-year-old man picking huckleberries in Montana shot and killed a grizzly bear after it attacked in a surprise encounter and injured him badly enough that he had to be hospitalized, authorities said Friday.
The man was alone on national forest land when the adult female charged him Thursday. He suffered significant injuries before killing the bear with a handgun, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks officials said.
The bear was likely reacting defensively to protect cubs, agency spokesperson Dillon Tabish said.
Wildlife workers set out game cameras in the area to try to confirm the presence of any cubs. If cubs are found, it's uncertain if they would be captured because it is difficult to find facilities qualified to take them, The Associated Press quoted him as saying.
“Depending on the age, we might leave them in the wild because they have a better chance of survival, rather than have to euthanize them,” Tabish said.
The attack happened on the Flathead National Forest about 2 miles (3.2 kilometers) north of Columbia Falls, a northwestern Montana city of about 5,500 people, according to the state wildlife agency.
The victim's name and further details on his condition were not released.
Meanwhile, Fish, Wildlife & Parks staff shot and killed an adult female grizzly Thursday after it had become accustomed to seeking out food from people and breaking into houses in and around Gardiner, a town of about 800 people just north of Yellowstone National Park.
Pet food, garbage and barbeque grills left outside and accessible to bears contributed to the problem, according to a department statement. No people were hurt by the bear before it was shot in the Yellowstone River.
Wildlife managers sometimes capture and move grizzly bears that are known to cause problems for people. But they will kill ones involved in predatory attacks on people or if they are deemed likely to keep causing problems regardless of being moved.