Kremlin Says: Don't Be Worried about Russian Warships in Cuba

The Russian nuclear-powered submarine Kazan (L) and the class frigate Admiral Gorshkov arrive at Havana, Cuba, June 12, 2024. (AFP Photo)
The Russian nuclear-powered submarine Kazan (L) and the class frigate Admiral Gorshkov arrive at Havana, Cuba, June 12, 2024. (AFP Photo)
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Kremlin Says: Don't Be Worried about Russian Warships in Cuba

The Russian nuclear-powered submarine Kazan (L) and the class frigate Admiral Gorshkov arrive at Havana, Cuba, June 12, 2024. (AFP Photo)
The Russian nuclear-powered submarine Kazan (L) and the class frigate Admiral Gorshkov arrive at Havana, Cuba, June 12, 2024. (AFP Photo)

The Kremlin, asked about US nervousness about Russian warships visiting Cuba, said on Thursday that there was no reason for any country including the United States to be worried by the exercise.
A Russian navy frigate and a nuclear-powered submarine churned into Havana harbor on Wednesday, a stopover the US and Cuba said posed no threat but which was widely seen as a Russian show of force as tensions rise over the Ukraine war, Reuters said.
Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said that it was common practice for all states including major maritime powers such as Russia to carry out military exercises.



EU Commission Boss Von der Leyen Elected for 2nd Five-Year Term

Ursula von der Leyen reacts after being chosen President of the European Commission for a second term, at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, July 18, 2024. REUTERS/Johanna Geron/File Photo
Ursula von der Leyen reacts after being chosen President of the European Commission for a second term, at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, July 18, 2024. REUTERS/Johanna Geron/File Photo
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EU Commission Boss Von der Leyen Elected for 2nd Five-Year Term

Ursula von der Leyen reacts after being chosen President of the European Commission for a second term, at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, July 18, 2024. REUTERS/Johanna Geron/File Photo
Ursula von der Leyen reacts after being chosen President of the European Commission for a second term, at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France, July 18, 2024. REUTERS/Johanna Geron/File Photo

Ursula von der Leyen won a second term as president of the European Commission on Thursday after pledging to create a continental "defense union" and to stay the course on Europe's green transition while cushioning its burden on industry.
Members of the European Parliament backed von der Leyen's bid for another five-year term at the helm of the European Union's powerful executive body with 401 votes in her favor and 284 against in a secret ballot in the 720-member chamber.
In an address to the Parliament in Strasbourg earlier in the day, von der Leyen, 65, laid out a program focused on prosperity and security, shaped by the challenges of Russia's war in Ukraine, global economic competition and climate change.
"The next five years will define Europe’s place in the world for the next five decades. It will decide whether we shape our own future or let it be shaped by events or by others," von der Leyen said ahead of the vote.
She stressed the need not to backtrack on the "Green Deal" transformation of the EU economy to fight climate change - a key pledge for Green lawmakers, who joined her core coalition of center-right, center-left and liberal groups in supporting her.
After pledging to support Ukraine for as long as it takes in its fight against Russia, von der Leyen said Europe's liberty was at stake and that it must invest more in defense.

Von der Leyen pledged to create "a true European Defense Union,” with flagship projects on air and cyber defense.
The plan sparked criticism from the Kremlin, which said it reflected an attitude of "militarization (and) confrontation.”

She also vowed to tackle housing shortages across Europe and said she would appoint a commissioner for the Mediterranean region due to the multiple challenges it faces.
She also took a swipe at Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán and his recent visit to Russia shortly after his country took over the rotating six-month EU presidency.
"This so-called peace mission was nothing but an appeasement mission,” von der Leyen said as she vowed that Europe would remain shoulder-to-shoulder with Ukraine.