Netanyahu Says Blinken Assured Him US Will Cancel Limits on Weapons Supplies

 US Secretary of State Antony Blinken gives a joint press conference with his Qatari counterpart in Doha on June 12, 2024. (AFP)
US Secretary of State Antony Blinken gives a joint press conference with his Qatari counterpart in Doha on June 12, 2024. (AFP)
TT

Netanyahu Says Blinken Assured Him US Will Cancel Limits on Weapons Supplies

 US Secretary of State Antony Blinken gives a joint press conference with his Qatari counterpart in Doha on June 12, 2024. (AFP)
US Secretary of State Antony Blinken gives a joint press conference with his Qatari counterpart in Doha on June 12, 2024. (AFP)

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Tuesday said that US Secretary of State Antony Blinken had assured him that the Biden administration was working to cancel restrictions on arms deliveries to Israel.

Netanyahu in a statement said that when he met US Secretary of State Antony Blinken last week, he expressed appreciation for the support the United States has given Israel since the start of the war against Palestinian group Hamas in October. But he also said it was "inconceivable that in the past few months, the administration has been withholding weapons and ammunitions to Israel."

Blinken, Netanyahu said, assured that the administration was working "day and night" to remove such bottlenecks.

"I certainly hope that's the case. It should be the case," Netanyahu said. "Give us the tools and we'll finish the job a lot faster."

President Joe Biden last month warned Israel that the US would stop supplying it weapons if Israeli forces make a major invasion of Rafah, a refugee-packed city in southern Gaza.

Days later, Israeli forces began an offensive in Rafah, saying Hamas fighters were hiding there and reiterating that eliminating Hamas and bringing back hostages were Israel's main goals.

On Monday, the Washington Post reported that two key Democrats in the US Congress have agreed to support a major arms sale to Israel that includes 50 F-15 fighter jets worth more than $18 billion.

Representative Gregory Meeks and Senator Ben Cardin, it said, have signed off on the deal under heavy pressure from the Biden administration after the two lawmakers had for months held up the sale.



Bangladesh Extends Curfew ahead of Court Hearing on Controversial Job Quotas

18 July 2024, Bangladesh, Dhaka: People and police clash during a protest against the government's job quota system. Photo: Rubel Karmaker/ZUMA Press Wire/dpa
18 July 2024, Bangladesh, Dhaka: People and police clash during a protest against the government's job quota system. Photo: Rubel Karmaker/ZUMA Press Wire/dpa
TT

Bangladesh Extends Curfew ahead of Court Hearing on Controversial Job Quotas

18 July 2024, Bangladesh, Dhaka: People and police clash during a protest against the government's job quota system. Photo: Rubel Karmaker/ZUMA Press Wire/dpa
18 July 2024, Bangladesh, Dhaka: People and police clash during a protest against the government's job quota system. Photo: Rubel Karmaker/ZUMA Press Wire/dpa

Bangladesh extended a curfew on Sunday to control violent student-led protests that have killed at least 114 people, as authorities braced for a Supreme Court hearing later in the day on government job quotas that sparked the anger.
Soldiers have been on patrol on the streets of capital Dhaka, the center of the demonstrations that spiraled into clashes between protesters and security forces, Reuters said.
Internet and text message services in Bangladesh have been suspended since Thursday, cutting the nation off as police cracked down on protesters who defied a ban on public gatherings.
A curfew ordered late on Friday has been extended to 3 p.m. (0900 GMT) on Sunday, until after the Supreme Court hearing, and will continue for an "uncertain time" following a two-hour break for people to gather supplies, local media reported.
Universities and colleges have also been closed since Wednesday.
Nationwide unrest broke out following student anger against quotas for government jobs that included reserving 30% for the families of those who fought for independence from Pakistan.
Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina's government had scrapped the quota system in 2018, but a court reinstated it last month.
The Supreme Court suspended the decision after a government appeal and will hear the case on Sunday after agreeing to bring forward a hearing scheduled for Aug. 7.
The demonstrations - the biggest since Hasina was re-elected for a fourth successive term this year - have also been fueled by high unemployment among young people, who make up nearly a fifth of the population.
The US State Department on Saturday raised its travel advisory for Bangladesh to level four, urging American citizens to not travel to the South Asian country.