France's Far Right National Rally Still Leading ahead of Election, Poll Shows

An activist of French far-right Rassemblement National (RN) party (L) distributes leaflets as President of the Occitanie regional council Carole Delga (R) arrives to support the candidate of the left wing coalition Nouveau Front Populaire (NFP), in the Cazeres market, near Toulouse, south-western France, on June 22, 2024, ahead of snap elections for a new national assembly on June 30 and July 7, 2024. (Photo by Valentine CHAPUIS / AFP)
An activist of French far-right Rassemblement National (RN) party (L) distributes leaflets as President of the Occitanie regional council Carole Delga (R) arrives to support the candidate of the left wing coalition Nouveau Front Populaire (NFP), in the Cazeres market, near Toulouse, south-western France, on June 22, 2024, ahead of snap elections for a new national assembly on June 30 and July 7, 2024. (Photo by Valentine CHAPUIS / AFP)
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France's Far Right National Rally Still Leading ahead of Election, Poll Shows

An activist of French far-right Rassemblement National (RN) party (L) distributes leaflets as President of the Occitanie regional council Carole Delga (R) arrives to support the candidate of the left wing coalition Nouveau Front Populaire (NFP), in the Cazeres market, near Toulouse, south-western France, on June 22, 2024, ahead of snap elections for a new national assembly on June 30 and July 7, 2024. (Photo by Valentine CHAPUIS / AFP)
An activist of French far-right Rassemblement National (RN) party (L) distributes leaflets as President of the Occitanie regional council Carole Delga (R) arrives to support the candidate of the left wing coalition Nouveau Front Populaire (NFP), in the Cazeres market, near Toulouse, south-western France, on June 22, 2024, ahead of snap elections for a new national assembly on June 30 and July 7, 2024. (Photo by Valentine CHAPUIS / AFP)

France's far right National Rally (RN) party and its allies are seen leading the first round of the country's parliamentary elections with 35.5% of the vote, according to a poll published Sunday.
The Ipsos survey - conducted for Le Parisien newspaper and Radio France on June 19-20 - showed the left-wing New Popular Front (NPF) alliance in second place with 29.5% of the vote, Reuters reported.
President Emmanuel Macron's centrist alliance was seen in third place, winning 19.5% of votes.
The turnout rate is seen at between 60 and 64%, which would be much higher than the 47.5% seen at the last general election in June 2022.
The RN's lead in polls ahead of the election that will take place in two rounds, on June 30 and July 7, is unlikely to win the party an absolute majority. Macron called the ballot after his alliance's crushing defeat at EU elections earlier this month.
In a separate Ipsos survey, published by the Financial Times, the National Rally is seen as the most trustworthy when it comes to managing the economy and public finances.
According to the survey, 25% of respondents trust Marine Le Pen's RN the most to take the right decisions on economic issues, versus 22% for the New Popular Front and 20% for Macron's alliance.



Azerbaijan Proposes Document on Principles of Peace before Full Deal with Armenia

FILE PHOTO: Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev delivers a speech at the 10th Southern Gas Corridor Advisory Council Ministerial Meeting and the 2nd Green Energy Advisory Council Ministerial Meeting in Baku, Azerbaijan, March 1, 2024. REUTERS/Aziz Karimov/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev delivers a speech at the 10th Southern Gas Corridor Advisory Council Ministerial Meeting and the 2nd Green Energy Advisory Council Ministerial Meeting in Baku, Azerbaijan, March 1, 2024. REUTERS/Aziz Karimov/File Photo
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Azerbaijan Proposes Document on Principles of Peace before Full Deal with Armenia

FILE PHOTO: Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev delivers a speech at the 10th Southern Gas Corridor Advisory Council Ministerial Meeting and the 2nd Green Energy Advisory Council Ministerial Meeting in Baku, Azerbaijan, March 1, 2024. REUTERS/Aziz Karimov/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev delivers a speech at the 10th Southern Gas Corridor Advisory Council Ministerial Meeting and the 2nd Green Energy Advisory Council Ministerial Meeting in Baku, Azerbaijan, March 1, 2024. REUTERS/Aziz Karimov/File Photo

Azerbaijan is proposing to sign a document with Armenia on the basic principles of a future peace treaty as an interim measure as they wrangle over a broader deal, a senior Azerbaijani official said on Sunday.
Both Armenia and Azerbaijan have repeatedly said they want to sign a peace treaty to end the conflict over the former breakaway Azerbaijani region of Nagorno-Karabakh, reported Reuters.
Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev said on Saturday a text of a treaty was 80%-90% ready but repeated it was impossible to sign it before Armenia amended its constitution to remove an indirect reference to Karabakh independence, which Armenia has rejected.
Karabakh's ethnic Armenian inhabitants enjoyed de facto independence from Azerbaijan for more than three decades until September 2023, when a lightning Azerbaijani offensive retook the territory and prompted around 100,000 Armenians to flee.
Both countries have in recent months sought to make progress on the peace treaty, including the demarcation of borders, with Armenia agreeing to hand over to Azerbaijan four contested border villages.
A document on the basic principles could be considered as a temporary measure and form the basis of the bilateral ties and ensure neighborly relations between the two countries, Hikmet Hajiyev, foreign policy adviser to the president, told Reuters.
It can be signed until Azerbaijan holds COP29 climate summit in November, Hajiyev added.
Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan said in June that a peace treaty with Azerbaijan was close to completion but that his country would not accept its demands that it change its constitution.
After he made those comments, clashes broke out between police and demonstrators, the latest in a series of protests denouncing his policies, including the handing back of ruined villages to Azerbaijan, and demanding his resignation.
On July 5, Constitution Day in Armenia, Pashinyan said the country needed a new constitution "which the people will consider to be what they created, what they accepted, what is written in it is their idea of the state they created and the relations between people and citizens in that state".