98 Int’l Organizations Call for Supporting Peace Opportunities in Yemen

75 percent of Yemen's population suffers from fatigue due to the war (United Nations)
75 percent of Yemen's population suffers from fatigue due to the war (United Nations)
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98 Int’l Organizations Call for Supporting Peace Opportunities in Yemen

75 percent of Yemen's population suffers from fatigue due to the war (United Nations)
75 percent of Yemen's population suffers from fatigue due to the war (United Nations)

Yemen stands at the historic opportunity for a shift towards lasting peace, said 98 international and national actors delivering humanitarian responses in the country, asserting that the humanitarian community is committed to supporting this shift.

The organizations presented the UN General Assembly with a statement highlighting the ongoing crisis and urgent funding gap, saying that with the hope of peace, there is strong momentum to invest in durable solutions to displacement.

It is positive as the international community must work to support Yemenis to find alternatives to displacement as soon as safe, dignified, and sustainable options become available, it said.

The statement noted that over 21.6 million people, 75 percent of the Yemeni population, struggle with humanitarian needs.

The organizations hoped the forthcoming 2023 Internal Displacement Solutions Fund (IDSF) would prioritize Yemen, alleviating dependence on humanitarian assistance.

They warned that about 17 million people are food insecure, including 6.1 million in the emergency phase under the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC).

The statement noted that it signified extreme food shortages and acute malnutrition, primarily affecting women and children, with a risk of hunger-related deaths.

Yemen faces critical water shortages for both agricultural production and human use.

- Urgent needs

Nearly 15.4 million people require safe water and sanitation access to avoid being at risk of cholera and other deadly diseases.

The organizations reported that overcrowded living conditions in camps, low immunization rates, and inaccessibility to many children have increased measles and rubella cases.

The joint statement stated that Yemen's health system continues to crumble under pressure to meet increasing needs with little or no resources, resulting in an estimated 20.3 million people lacking access to healthcare.

Across the country, one woman dies every two hours during pregnancy or childbirth, while six of ten births occur without a skilled birth attendant.

It also reiterated that mine clearance must be highly prioritized.

Yemen remains one of the world's most contaminated countries, with explosive remnants of war (ERW) leading to death and maiming, particularly children.

Additionally, at least 17.7 million people require protection assistance and services.

Women and girls face increased risks of violence and exploitation while trying to access essential services due to distant, challenging journeys. More than nine million children are at risk and need protection and basic services.

According to the organizations, nearly one in four Yemenis, or over 5.5 million people, suffer from mental health disorders, mainly due to living for years in conflict, and require medical intervention.

- Lack of funding

The organizations warned that funding levels in 2023 will also negatively impact the thriving and active civil society space and their ability to operate.

Increasing quality funding for Yemeni civil society, including women-led organizations, will ensure improved outreach to communities and a positive step towards honoring commitments to localization.

They noted that the country's economy has also been ravaged.

The continued challenges over fuel, weak and contradictory currencies and fiscal policies, and ongoing inflation are impacting the ability of the population to afford essential goods and services, pushing them to resort to irreversible negative coping strategies.

The statement stressed that the international community must, alongside humanitarian assistance, support Yemen by investing in an economic financial package.

It explained that the package would stabilize local currencies, support, and enable commercial import of commodities into the country, and support solutions towards a mechanism to pay civil servant salaries.

The international and national actors within the humanitarian and development communities in Yemen urged donor Member States to urgently consider upscaling quality and flexible humanitarian funding, in line with the 2023 Humanitarian Response Plan so that UN, INGOs, and particularly Yemeni civil society organizations.

They concluded that the funding would help meet needs, avoid a regression of gains made towards strengthening the resilience of the people of Yemen, and support them to regain self-reliance.

Yemen's humanitarian response requires an expanded and more diversified number of donors.



Israel Strikes Gaza, Yemen, Lebanon Foes after Attacks

Smoke rises from a building hit by an Israeli strike in Nuseirat in the central Gaza Strip on July 20, 2024, amid the ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestinian group Hamas. (Photo by Eyad BABA / AFP)
Smoke rises from a building hit by an Israeli strike in Nuseirat in the central Gaza Strip on July 20, 2024, amid the ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestinian group Hamas. (Photo by Eyad BABA / AFP)
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Israel Strikes Gaza, Yemen, Lebanon Foes after Attacks

Smoke rises from a building hit by an Israeli strike in Nuseirat in the central Gaza Strip on July 20, 2024, amid the ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestinian group Hamas. (Photo by Eyad BABA / AFP)
Smoke rises from a building hit by an Israeli strike in Nuseirat in the central Gaza Strip on July 20, 2024, amid the ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestinian group Hamas. (Photo by Eyad BABA / AFP)

The Middle East was reeling Sunday from deadly violence with Israel bombing Gaza, Lebanon and Yemen in quick succession in response to attacks from Iran-backed militant groups.
Despite Washington's top diplomat asserting a deal is near the "goal line" to end more than nine months of devastating war between Israel and Gaza rulers Hamas, the Israeli military said it intercepted a missile fired from Yemen, as it pressed on with its offensive in the besieged Palestinian territory, Agence France Presse reported.
Dozens have been killed since Saturday across the Gaza Strip, the civil defense agency said, including in strikes on homes in the central Nuseirat and Bureij areas and displaced people near southern Khan Yunis.
Residents said a major operation was underway in the district of Rafah in the south, reporting heavy artillery and clashes.
The deadly strikes in Gaza came hours after Hezbollah and its ally Hamas said they fired at Israeli positions from south Lebanon, while Yemen's Houthi group vowed to respond to Israeli warplanes hitting a key port.
The fire left raging by the strikes on Hodeida port "is seen across the Middle East and the significance is clear," Israeli Defense Minister Yoav Gallant said.
Detailing the first strikes claimed by Israel in Yemen, Gallant warned of further operations if the Houthis "dare to attack us" after a Houthi drone strike killed one in Tel Aviv on Friday.
In Hodeida three people were killed and 87 wounded, health officials said in a statement carried by Houthi media.
Netanyahu travels to Washington
The trio of militant groups has vowed to keep up attacks on Israel until a truce ends the violence in Gaza, which lies in ruins, with most residents forced to flee their homes.
The Gaza war was triggered by Hamas's October 7 attack on southern Israel, which resulted in the deaths of 1,195 people, mostly civilians, according to an AFP tally based on Israeli figures.
The militants also seized 251 hostages, 116 of whom are still in Gaza, including 42 the Israeli military says are dead.
Israel's military retaliation to wipe out Hamas has killed at least 38,919 people, also mostly civilians, according to data from the health ministry in Hamas-ruled Gaza.
The war has also unleashed hunger and health crises in Gaza, with Israel and the United Nations trading blame for vital aid supplies failing to reach those in need.
After the detection of poliovirus in Gaza sewage, though no individual cases, the World Health Organization said there were "monumental" constraints to mounting a timely response.
WHO spokesman Christian Lindmeier said Friday the agency believes many more diseases are "spreading out of control" inside Gaza.
The premier is due to address US lawmakers Wednesday in Washington, where he will be under pressure to reach a ceasefire with Hamas.
US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said Friday a truce was within reach.
"I believe we're... driving toward the goal line in getting an agreement that would produce a ceasefire, get the hostages home, and put us on a better track to trying to build lasting peace and stability," he said.