Egypt’s New Government Seeks Parliament Confidence with Four-Pillar Plan

The Egyptian Prime Minister delivers the government statement before the Parliament in the new administrative capital (Cabinet)
The Egyptian Prime Minister delivers the government statement before the Parliament in the new administrative capital (Cabinet)
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Egypt’s New Government Seeks Parliament Confidence with Four-Pillar Plan

The Egyptian Prime Minister delivers the government statement before the Parliament in the new administrative capital (Cabinet)
The Egyptian Prime Minister delivers the government statement before the Parliament in the new administrative capital (Cabinet)

Egypt’s new government introduced its three-year plan titled “Together We Build a Sustainable Future” before parliament on Monday, aiming to secure legislative confidence.

Prime Minister Mustafa Madbouly committed to resolving the country’s electricity crisis and safeguarding Egypt’s Nile water share.

Following a month of consultations, President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi’s administration completed its ministerial formation, merging ministries, appointing new officials, and restructuring key portfolios in Defense, Foreign Affairs, and Justice.

Madbouly presented the government’s agenda for 2024/2025 amd 2026/2027, focusing on four priorities: ensuring national security, advancing foreign policy, enhancing human development, and fostering a competitive economy to attract investments. The plan also emphasizes achieving political stability and national unity.

The prime minister underscored Egypt’s comprehensive approach to national security, including border stability, military capabilities, and securing critical assets like the Red Sea and Suez Canal.

Egypt also aims to strengthen its international and regional influence while protecting essential areas like water and energy security.

Madbouly reaffirmed Egypt’s commitment to preserving its Nile water rights through enhanced cooperation with Nile Basin and African nations.

The premier addressed long standing challenges, including a decade-long water conflict with Ethiopia over the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD). Cairo fears the dam could diminish its share of the Nile’s waters.

Madbouly emphasized the government’s focus on addressing citizens’ concerns and improving local governance to foster positive community engagement.

Regarding the electricity crisis, Madbouly pledged firm action to resolve it within the first half of his administration's program. He noted efforts to stabilize markets and reduce inflation in recent months.

Egypt faces electricity shortages, leading to scheduled power cuts lasting up to three hours, alongside successive waves of price hikes and currency depreciation.



Syrian Observatory: Türkiye Forcibly Deporting Thousands of Syrians

Syrian refugees at one of the crossings between Türkiye and Syria (Syrian Observatory for Human Rights)
Syrian refugees at one of the crossings between Türkiye and Syria (Syrian Observatory for Human Rights)
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Syrian Observatory: Türkiye Forcibly Deporting Thousands of Syrians

Syrian refugees at one of the crossings between Türkiye and Syria (Syrian Observatory for Human Rights)
Syrian refugees at one of the crossings between Türkiye and Syria (Syrian Observatory for Human Rights)

Türkiye has forcibly deported early in July, 3,540 Syrians with temporary protection identity cards to northern Syria, in addition to 840 refugees in the past 7 days, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said on Friday
“Turkish authorities forcibly detained more than 125 Syrian families, including children and women, in deportation centers in the province of Kayseri, as Ankara is preparing to send them back to Syria,” SOHR said.
It added that on Friday, 120 Syrians were already deported through the Turkish border crossings towards northern Syria.
According to the Observatory, “Türkiye is forcibly deporting more than 100 Syrians every day, most of them holding temporary protection ID card (Kimlik), with the aim of settling them in areas under its control in the Euphrates Shield, the Olive Branch and the Peace Spring.
SOHR condemned the “humiliating way and inhumane treatment” by Turkish authorities towards Syrian refugees forcibly being deported back to their country.
It also called on the international community to “assume its responsibilities towards protecting Syrian refugees in Türkiye and prevent their deportation under the pretext of sending them to a safe zone.”
The Turkish government said on Friday it was deporting at least seven Syrians for “provocatively” sharing their images while eating bananas on social media after a Turkish citizen complained that he cannot afford bananas while the refugees can, according to Bloomberg.
Three weeks ago, tensions rose between Turks and Syrian refugees after the arrest of a Syrian man who had been accused of harassing a child.
Turkish police then arrested 474 of people during anti-Syrian riots in several cities, damaging businesses and properties belonging to the Syrians.