Iraq Issues Death Sentence against Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s Wife

The Supreme Judicial Council said the Yazidi women were kidnapped by ISIS gangs and then held prisoner by the woman in her house in Mosul. Photo: local media
The Supreme Judicial Council said the Yazidi women were kidnapped by ISIS gangs and then held prisoner by the woman in her house in Mosul. Photo: local media
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Iraq Issues Death Sentence against Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s Wife

The Supreme Judicial Council said the Yazidi women were kidnapped by ISIS gangs and then held prisoner by the woman in her house in Mosul. Photo: local media
The Supreme Judicial Council said the Yazidi women were kidnapped by ISIS gangs and then held prisoner by the woman in her house in Mosul. Photo: local media

An Iraqi court issued a death sentence against a wife of the late ISIS leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, for working with the group and detaining Yazidi women in her home, the Iraqi judiciary said on Wednesday without naming the woman.
The Supreme Judicial Council in Iraq said the Yazidi women were kidnapped by ISIS gangs in Sinjar district, west of Nineveh Governorate, and then held prisoner by the woman in her house in Mosul. The woman is being held in Iraqi custody.

"The criminal court today sentenced Baghdadi's wife to death by hanging for crimes against humanity and genocide against the Yazidi people and also for contributing to terrorism actions," a court official who declined to go on record as he is not authorized to talk to the media told Reuters.

The ruling must be ratified by an Iraqi appeal court to become final and applicable, the official added.

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who was killed in November 2019 in a raid by US special forces in northwestern Syria, rose from obscurity to lead the extremist group and declare himself "caliph" of all Muslims, holding sway over huge areas of Iraq and Syria from 2014-2017 before ISIS’ control disintegrated under US-led attacks.



Syrian Observatory: Türkiye Forcibly Deporting Thousands of Syrians

Syrian refugees at one of the crossings between Türkiye and Syria (Syrian Observatory for Human Rights)
Syrian refugees at one of the crossings between Türkiye and Syria (Syrian Observatory for Human Rights)
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Syrian Observatory: Türkiye Forcibly Deporting Thousands of Syrians

Syrian refugees at one of the crossings between Türkiye and Syria (Syrian Observatory for Human Rights)
Syrian refugees at one of the crossings between Türkiye and Syria (Syrian Observatory for Human Rights)

Türkiye has forcibly deported early in July, 3,540 Syrians with temporary protection identity cards to northern Syria, in addition to 840 refugees in the past 7 days, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said on Friday
“Turkish authorities forcibly detained more than 125 Syrian families, including children and women, in deportation centers in the province of Kayseri, as Ankara is preparing to send them back to Syria,” SOHR said.
It added that on Friday, 120 Syrians were already deported through the Turkish border crossings towards northern Syria.
According to the Observatory, “Türkiye is forcibly deporting more than 100 Syrians every day, most of them holding temporary protection ID card (Kimlik), with the aim of settling them in areas under its control in the Euphrates Shield, the Olive Branch and the Peace Spring.
SOHR condemned the “humiliating way and inhumane treatment” by Turkish authorities towards Syrian refugees forcibly being deported back to their country.
It also called on the international community to “assume its responsibilities towards protecting Syrian refugees in Türkiye and prevent their deportation under the pretext of sending them to a safe zone.”
The Turkish government said on Friday it was deporting at least seven Syrians for “provocatively” sharing their images while eating bananas on social media after a Turkish citizen complained that he cannot afford bananas while the refugees can, according to Bloomberg.
Three weeks ago, tensions rose between Turks and Syrian refugees after the arrest of a Syrian man who had been accused of harassing a child.
Turkish police then arrested 474 of people during anti-Syrian riots in several cities, damaging businesses and properties belonging to the Syrians.