Riyadh Air Presents Features of its Future at Dubai Air Show

Riyadh Air, the new national air carrier wholly owned by the Public Investment Fund, participated in the Dubai Airshow 2023. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
Riyadh Air, the new national air carrier wholly owned by the Public Investment Fund, participated in the Dubai Airshow 2023. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
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Riyadh Air Presents Features of its Future at Dubai Air Show

Riyadh Air, the new national air carrier wholly owned by the Public Investment Fund, participated in the Dubai Airshow 2023. (Asharq Al-Awsat)
Riyadh Air, the new national air carrier wholly owned by the Public Investment Fund, participated in the Dubai Airshow 2023. (Asharq Al-Awsat)

Riyadh Air, the new national air carrier wholly owned by the Public Investment Fund, participated in the Dubai Airshow 2023 last week, revealing two categories for the exterior design of its aircraft fleet and a set of strategic partnerships.
The Riyadh Air pavilion at the Dubai Airshow attracted thousands of visitors and a number of senior officials, as well as local and international media representatives.
The exhibition activities also witnessed the participation of officials from Riyadh Air in a number of discussion sessions that touched on topics that included air traffic, innovative technologies and the experiences of passengers, as well as sustainable practices and the means to attract talent in the aviation and air transport sector.
Commenting on the participation in the Dubai Airshow 2023, Riyadh Air CEO, Tony Douglas, said: “It has been an extraordinary week, as a digital start-up we want to disrupt the aviation industry and we have certainly done that at the Dubai Airshow.”
He continued: “Since our launch in March, we have made exceptional progress hitting a number of milestones and in Dubai we have continued to shape the future of air travel with our beautiful second livery with a unique iridescent shine unlike any other aircraft, again capturing the world’s attention and going viral across social channels.”
Douglas stressed that the strategic cooperation concluded by Riyadh Air with Saudia Airlines reflected their common desire to achieve the goals of developing the tourism and travel sector within the Kingdom.
He added: “Our alliance with Lucid Group is a clear reflection of our joint values around sustainably, digital thinking and obsessional attention to detail, while our Lufthansa Systems deal sees us adopt the gold standard of aviation systems. Over the coming weeks and months, we will be sharing more exciting updates, developments and milestones for Riyadh Air, as we continue the momentum and pace towards our maiden flight in 2025 and as the most forward-thinking carrier in the skies.”
Strategic partnerships
Riyadh Air and Saudia signed a memorandum of understanding for strategic cooperation, which will seek to enable guests of both carriers to take full advantage of each airline’s worldwide network through a comprehensive interline and codeshare agreement.
Another MoU was signed between Riyadh Air and Lucid Motors at the Dubai Airshow, marking the first innovative partnership between luxury EV manufacturer Lucid Group and Riyadh Air. The agreement comes in line with a shared vision for the future of sustainable transportation.
Riyadh Air also announced it had signed an agreement with Lufthansa Systems as a partner to mutually drive innovation in digitalization and sustainability. The agreement will see the implementation of an integrated suite from Lufthansa Systems helping unlock digital leadership in aviation sustainability.



Biden Administration Proposes Rules to Curb Investments in China's AI, Tech Sector

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Biden Administration Proposes Rules to Curb Investments in China's AI, Tech Sector

The United States Treasury Department has fleshed out a proposed rule that would restrict and monitor US investments in China for artificial intelligence, computer chips and quantum computing.

The fleshed-out draft rule, issued on Friday, stems from President Joe Biden’s August executive order regarding the access that “countries of concern” have to US dollars to fund advanced technologies that could enhance those nations’ military, intelligence, surveillance and cyber-capabilities. The order identified China, Hong Kong and Macau as countries of concern, according to the Associated Press.

The Biden administration has sought to stymie the development of technologies by China, the world’s second largest economy, that could give it a military edge or enable it to dominate emerging sectors such as electric vehicles (EVs).

In addition to the proposed rule, Biden, a Democrat, has also placed a stiff tariff on Chinese EVs, an issue with political implications as Biden and his Republican presidential opponent Donald Trump are both trying to show voters who can best stand up to China, a geopolitical rival and major trading partner.

According to the Financial Times, the regulation — which could be amended following a six-week public comment period — is aimed at restricting the flow of US technology, capital and expertise to groups in China that work with the People's Liberation Army.

The newspaper said it is the latest US effort to make it harder for Chinese groups deemed to be a security threat to gain access to new technology and will complement several sweeping export control packages introduced over the past two years.

Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Investment Security Paul Rosen said, “This proposed rule advances our national security by preventing the many benefits certain US investments provide—beyond just capital—from supporting the development of sensitive technologies in countries that may use them to threaten our national security.”

The regulation would introduce outright bans on certain investments and require American individuals and organizations to notify the government of other transactions, FT said.

It also includes possible exceptions, including for investments in publicly traded securities or funds. The new rule would affect everything from equity investments to debt financing that is convertible to equity. It would also apply to greenfield investments and joint ventures. But it would exempt investments by limited partners (LP) — endowments and pension funds that seed venture capital and private equity groups — below a certain threshold.

According to FT, the Treasury said the regulation would prevent the exploitation of US investment by countries “seeking to develop sensitive technologies or products that are critical to the next generation of military, intelligence, surveillance, or cyber-enabled capabilities” that pose a threat to the US. But it singled out China as a “country of concern.”

J. Philip Ludvigson, a partner at King & Spalding and a former Treasury official for Investment Security, said “companies and investors are now getting a much better look at what will be expected of them” under the new outbound investment program.

“These added details are particularly important because the private sector will be shouldering the many due diligence and compliance burdens associated with making new investments,” he said.

The Biden administration has been criticized — mostly by Republican lawmakers — for not proposing to ban investment in publicly traded securities.

FT said the effort to screen outbound investment is one of a number of issues that have stoked tensions between the US and China.

In the six months since Biden and China’s President Xi Jinping met in San Francisco, the two countries have stepped up high-level engagement to try to stabilize relations.

But senior US officials from Treasury secretary Janet Yellen to national security adviser Jake Sullivan have been clear with Beijing that Washington will continue to introduce measures to reduce what they view as security threats from China.