Leaders in Riyadh Forge Policies Safeguarding Global Economy from Shocks

Part of the launch of the World Economic Forum activities in Riyadh (SPA)
Part of the launch of the World Economic Forum activities in Riyadh (SPA)
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Leaders in Riyadh Forge Policies Safeguarding Global Economy from Shocks

Part of the launch of the World Economic Forum activities in Riyadh (SPA)
Part of the launch of the World Economic Forum activities in Riyadh (SPA)

The bustling scene in Saudi Arabia is echoing the triumph of its economic overhaul under the national transformation plan, “Vision 2030.”

As the world converges for the World Economic Forum’s special gathering on global collaboration, growth, and energy for development in Riyadh on April 28 and 29, all eyes are on the Kingdom’s strides towards prosperity and sustainability.

Bringing together more than 700 participants, including stakeholders from governments and international organizations, politicians and corporate leaders, the gathering is expected to address global challenges as geopolitical tensions increase.

Vision 2030 has turned the Kingdom into a global hub for discussions, according to Faisal Alibrahim, Saudi Arabia’s Minister of Economy and Planning.

Energy was a major focus at the forum’s start, with Saudi Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman highlighting the challenges of transitioning to green energy. Saudi Arabia aims to provide all types of energy to the world, he stressed.

Saudi Finance Minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan discussed how regional conflicts, like those in Gaza, affect economies by putting pressure on emotions. Stability is crucial for the region’s welfare and growth, he emphasized.

The success of Vision 2030 in Saudi Arabia is proof that nations can transform, said Kristalina Georgieva, the managing director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). She stressed the need to share economic growth benefits among all countries.

Georgieva said that changes in interest rates can harm overall growth. She called for more cooperation, stabilizing finances, and lowering inflation.

Georgieva pointed out that the coronavirus pandemic cost the world about $3.3 trillion and stressed the immediate need to control inflation and rebuild financial safety nets. She warned against relying too much on one source for essential supplies, as it could hurt economic growth.

Al-Jadaan talked about how conflicts in the region put pressure on economies and people’s feelings, affecting economic stability. He urged a focus on people and economic growth over political issues.

Al-Jadaan highlighted Saudi Arabia’s goal of reducing tensions in the region in recent years and emphasized the need for economic plans to adapt to changing circumstances. He praised Vision 2030 for boosting investor confidence and driving positive economic progress in the country.

Moreover, the Minister mentioned the increased role of the private sector under Vision 2030, which focuses on quality rather than quantity of growth. He explained the importance of non-oil economic growth and strengthening the private sector for economic development.

Al-Jadaan also pointed out the global shocks of the past four years and the need for countries, including Saudi Arabia, to ensure their plans can withstand such challenges.

On his part, Alibrahim stressed using new technology for human welfare.

He highlighted how artificial intelligence will bring in billions economically over the next decade. Alibrahim noted Saudi Arabia’s role in creating opportunities under King Salman bin Abdulaziz and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s guidance.

The Minister emphasized the importance of international cooperation, growth, and energy discussions during the forum in Riyadh, focusing on investing in people’s skills and well-being.

Alibrahim also mentioned Vision 2030’s aim to tackle various challenges, including social, economic, and humanitarian ones.

He stressed responsible energy production and consumption, advocating for new clean solutions for sustainability, and underlined energy’s crucial role in the economy.



Egypt Says it Cut Foreign Debt by $14 Bln in 5 Months to May

The Central Bank of Egypt's headquarters is seen in downtown Cairo, Egypt March 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
The Central Bank of Egypt's headquarters is seen in downtown Cairo, Egypt March 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
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Egypt Says it Cut Foreign Debt by $14 Bln in 5 Months to May

The Central Bank of Egypt's headquarters is seen in downtown Cairo, Egypt March 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
The Central Bank of Egypt's headquarters is seen in downtown Cairo, Egypt March 8, 2016. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

Egypt reduced its external debt by $14 billion in the five months to end-May, the sharpest such decline in the country's history, a statement released on Monday by Egypt's press center said.
The country's external debt fell to $154 billion as of the end of May from $168 billion at the end of December, according to the statement which quoted an unnamed high-level source at the central bank.
Egypt quadrupled its debt over the last nine years to help among others fund a new capital, build infrastructure and support an overvalued currency.