Victoria and Albert Museum Cares for Ancient Yemeni Objects

The works will be exhibited to the public as part of a new display on Culture in Crisis: Photo: V&A website
The works will be exhibited to the public as part of a new display on Culture in Crisis: Photo: V&A website
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Victoria and Albert Museum Cares for Ancient Yemeni Objects

The works will be exhibited to the public as part of a new display on Culture in Crisis: Photo: V&A website
The works will be exhibited to the public as part of a new display on Culture in Crisis: Photo: V&A website

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London has announced that it would research and temporarily care for four ancient carved stone funerary stelae, which were likely illegally looted from Yemen.

The works will be exhibited to the public as part of a new display on Culture in Crisis, the V&A’s program dedicated to the preservation of cultural heritage worldwide, at V&A East Storehouse from 2025, the museum said in a statement on Tuesday.

The objects, which most likely date from to the second half of the first millennium BCE, are of the type on The International Council of Museum’s ‘Emergency Red List of Cultural Objects at Risk’. They were discovered by an archaeology enthusiast in an interior design shop in east London, and recovered by The Metropolitan Police’s Art and Antiques Unit, which investigates art theft, illegal trafficking, and fraud.

The museum said it signed an agreement with Yemen for the V&A to take responsibility for the care of the stelae on a temporary basis, until Yemen deems it is safe to return the objects to their country of origin.

Director of the V&A Dr Tristram Hunt said the agreement will give the public the chance to appreciate the exceptional examples of Yemeni culture and creativity, before the objects are repatriated.

He added that the agreement shines “a light on how the V&A’s Culture in Crisis program helps curtail the illegal trade of looted objects and the preservation of cultural heritage worldwide.”



Chicago's Iconic 'Bean' Sculpture Reopens to Tourists

Visitors take photos of the "Cloud Gate" sculpture, also known as the "bean," at Millennium Park, Sunday, June 23, 2024. (Anthony Vazquez/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)
Visitors take photos of the "Cloud Gate" sculpture, also known as the "bean," at Millennium Park, Sunday, June 23, 2024. (Anthony Vazquez/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)
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Chicago's Iconic 'Bean' Sculpture Reopens to Tourists

Visitors take photos of the "Cloud Gate" sculpture, also known as the "bean," at Millennium Park, Sunday, June 23, 2024. (Anthony Vazquez/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)
Visitors take photos of the "Cloud Gate" sculpture, also known as the "bean," at Millennium Park, Sunday, June 23, 2024. (Anthony Vazquez/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

One of Chicago's most popular tourist attractions known as “The Bean” reopened to the public Sunday after nearly a year of renovations and construction.
Construction started in August last year, and fencing around the iconic sculpture limited closeup access to visitors. The work on the plaza surrounding the sculpture included new stairs, accessible ramps and a waterproofing system, according to the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events.
The bean-shaped sculpture by artist Anish Kapoor is formally known as “Cloud Gate” and weighs 110 tons (99.8 metric tons).
It’s a busy tourist hub near Michigan Avenue, particularly for selfies with its reflective surface inspired by liquid mercury. Views of skyscrapers and crowds are reflected on the Millenium Park sculpture.
“Visitors can once again have full access to Chicago’s iconic Cloud Gate by Anish Kapoor,” city officials said in a Sunday statement. “Come back and get your #selfie!”

One of Chicago's most popular tourist attractions known as “The Bean” reopened to the public Sunday after nearly a year of renovations and construction.
Construction started in August last year, and fencing around the iconic sculpture limited closeup access to visitors. The work on the plaza surrounding the sculpture included new stairs, accessible ramps and a waterproofing system, according to the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events.
The bean-shaped sculpture by artist Anish Kapoor is formally known as “Cloud Gate” and weighs 110 tons (99.8 metric tons).
It’s a busy tourist hub near Michigan Avenue, particularly for selfies with its reflective surface inspired by liquid mercury. Views of skyscrapers and crowds are reflected on the Millenium Park sculpture.
“Visitors can once again have full access to Chicago’s iconic Cloud Gate by Anish Kapoor,” city officials said in a Sunday statement. “Come back and get your #selfie!”