Gucci Hosts Star-Studded Cruise Collection Fashion Show in London’s Tate Modern 

A model wears an outfit for the Gucci Cruise fashion show in London, Monday, May 13, 2024. (AP)
A model wears an outfit for the Gucci Cruise fashion show in London, Monday, May 13, 2024. (AP)
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Gucci Hosts Star-Studded Cruise Collection Fashion Show in London’s Tate Modern 

A model wears an outfit for the Gucci Cruise fashion show in London, Monday, May 13, 2024. (AP)
A model wears an outfit for the Gucci Cruise fashion show in London, Monday, May 13, 2024. (AP)

For one night only, the utilitarian, concrete basement of London's Tate Modern museum was transformed into a lush green jungle Monday — and it was the hottest fashion ticket in town.

Luxury Italian fashion house Gucci hosted its star-studded cruise collection catwalk at the Thames-side modern art museum, showing a series of delicate sheer outfits, relaxed denim and daywear, all adorned with the brand's coveted leather bags and other accessories with the double-G logo.

Actors Paul Mescal and Andrew Scott and singers Dua Lipa and Solange Knowles were among celebrities perched on the front row. Also in attendance were Salma Hayek and her husband, Francois-Henri Pinault, who is chair and CEO of Kering, Gucci’s parent company.

The big-budget event displayed the first cruise collection by Sabato De Sarno, who was named Gucci's creative director last year and debuted his womenswear designs in September.

Gucci normally stages its shows in Milan, but like other fashion powerhouses it chooses locations around the world to show off its cruise collections — the shows in between the main spring and autumn displays.

On Monday, models meandered down a runway that wound its way around hundreds of ferns, overhanging plants and mossy paths, the mass of green a contrast to the grey, industrial show space. De Sarno said that contrast extends to his latest designs, which paired luxurious evening looks and floral embroidery with casual jackets and slouchy denim.

And what of the footwear? Comfort comes first, with all outfits, even the most glamorous evening gowns, paired with Mary Jane shoes, ballet flats or platform loafers worn with little white socks.

“Rigor and extravagance, strength in delicacy, Englishness with an Italian accent,” the show notes read.

De Sarno featured a few checked jackets in a nod to British style, though some other designs were a much more subtle tribute. Dresses and coats covered with squares made of a shimmering bead fringe were a reference to Scottish plaids.

The fashion house has a little-known historical link to the UK. Its founder, Guccio Gucci, had a stint working as a bellhop in the Savoy, the luxury London hotel, more than a century ago.

The brand says Guccio took inspiration from that experience when he opened his first store in Florence in 1921 to sell luggage. The rest, as they say, is history.



Vivienne Westwood's Clothes, Jewels Headed for Auction

Gallery staff pose with a dress from the 'DRESSED TO SCALE' collection by late British fashion designer Vivienne Westwood (1941-2022) during a press view at Christie's auction house in London, Britain, 13 June 2024. EPA/TOLGA AKMEN
Gallery staff pose with a dress from the 'DRESSED TO SCALE' collection by late British fashion designer Vivienne Westwood (1941-2022) during a press view at Christie's auction house in London, Britain, 13 June 2024. EPA/TOLGA AKMEN
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Vivienne Westwood's Clothes, Jewels Headed for Auction

Gallery staff pose with a dress from the 'DRESSED TO SCALE' collection by late British fashion designer Vivienne Westwood (1941-2022) during a press view at Christie's auction house in London, Britain, 13 June 2024. EPA/TOLGA AKMEN
Gallery staff pose with a dress from the 'DRESSED TO SCALE' collection by late British fashion designer Vivienne Westwood (1941-2022) during a press view at Christie's auction house in London, Britain, 13 June 2024. EPA/TOLGA AKMEN

Dresses, suits, shoes and jewelry from the personal collection of late British designer Vivienne Westwood will go under the hammer this month is an auction aimed at raising funds for charity.
More than 200 lots are being offered by Christie's in London for the two-part "Vivienne Westwood: The Personal Collection" auction, made up of a live sale on June 25 and an online auction running June 14-28.
Westwood, one of British fashion's biggest names, died in December 2022, aged 81. Her collaborator and widower Andreas Kronthaler has selected looks spanning some 40 years for the auction, with the earliest from Westwood's Autumn-Winter 1983-1984 collection.
"These are the things that she chose to wear herself throughout the last 40 years of her life," Adrian Hume-Sayer, head of sale for the auction, told Reuters at a press preview on Thursday. “It's very personal... These are the things you can see her on her bike, riding around London, press interviews, end of the catwalk... just conducting her day-to-day life. But she also lived... as she spoke. And so unlike many people... in her position she wore things repeatedly. She had favorites."
Westwood, whose name was synonymous with 1970s punk rebellion, was also known for her activism. Her T-shirts bore slogans against fossil fuel-driven climate change and pollution, as well as her support for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.
In addition to clothes and accessories, a set of enlarged prints of a pack of playing cards Westwood designed in 2017 - focusing on issues such as climate change and inequality - are also being offered for sale with an estimate of 30,000 pounds - 50,000 pounds ($38,292 - $63,820).
Proceeds from the auction will go towards causes and charities Westwood supported - her own Vivienne Foundation, Greenpeace, Amnesty International and Médecins Sans Frontières, Christie's said.
An exhibition of the lots will be open to the public at Christie's London from Friday until June 24.