First Yemeni Budget Since Coup Worth $3.8 Billion

Yemeni Prime Minister Ahmed bin Dagher (R) listens to his aide during a cabinet meeting of Yemeni ministerial council held in the Saudi capital Riyadh, on May 18, 2016. AFP PHOTO / FAYEZ NURELDINE
Yemeni Prime Minister Ahmed bin Dagher (R) listens to his aide during a cabinet meeting of Yemeni ministerial council held in the Saudi capital Riyadh, on May 18, 2016. AFP PHOTO / FAYEZ NURELDINE
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First Yemeni Budget Since Coup Worth $3.8 Billion

Yemeni Prime Minister Ahmed bin Dagher (R) listens to his aide during a cabinet meeting of Yemeni ministerial council held in the Saudi capital Riyadh, on May 18, 2016. AFP PHOTO / FAYEZ NURELDINE
Yemeni Prime Minister Ahmed bin Dagher (R) listens to his aide during a cabinet meeting of Yemeni ministerial council held in the Saudi capital Riyadh, on May 18, 2016. AFP PHOTO / FAYEZ NURELDINE

The Yemeni government announced on Sunday its first budget since Houthis launched their coup more than three years ago, with expenses worth $3.8 billion, revenues estimated at around $2.6 billion, and a financial deficit of 33 percent.

Yemeni Prime Minister Ahmed Obeid bin Daghr said that the Parliament would hold a meeting next month in Aden to approve the budget and reorganize the legislative branch in the country.

Sunday’s budget mainly approved the salaries of military employees and civil servants of the liberated provinces, in addition to providing payments for the reconstruction of institutions.

Bin Daghr told members of his government during the cabinet session in Aden, that the announced budget would cover the salaries of military employees and civil servants of 12 provinces for the whole year, in addition to specific sectors in the Houthi-controlled areas, including the judiciary, the health sector, universities and the high electoral committees.

The prime minister said that the government would pay the salaries of other government sectors in Houthi-controlled areas, only if the rebels supply financial revenues to the Central Bank.

The budget was released a few days after Saudi Arabia's $2bn deposit to the Yemeni central bank.

Bin Daher thanked the Kingdom, its King, Crown Prince, government and people for the deposit, saying “it came in the right timing.”

Meanwhile, Riyadh will witness on Monday a ministerial meeting of the Coalition Supporting Legitimacy in Yemen, and the announcement of a comprehensive plan for humanitarian operations.

Foreign ministers of the coalition are expected to hold several meetings to tackle efforts to coordinate the delivery of humanitarian assistance to Yemen.

Egyptian Foreign Ministry spokesman Ahmed Abu Zeid said that Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry would head to Riyadh on Monday to take part in the meeting.

He said the talks reflect the coalition's commitment to meeting the humanitarian needs of the Yemen’s people and mirror the Egyptian government and people's solidarity with Yemenis in times of need.



High Risk of Famine Persists Across Gaza, Global Hunger Monitor Says 

Men and children search through debris in the yard of the Asma school run by the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA), in the Shati camp for Palestinian refugees west of Gaza City, in the aftermath of overnight Israeli bombardment on June 25, 2024 amid the ongoing conflict in the Palestinian territory between Israel and Hamas. (AFP)
Men and children search through debris in the yard of the Asma school run by the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA), in the Shati camp for Palestinian refugees west of Gaza City, in the aftermath of overnight Israeli bombardment on June 25, 2024 amid the ongoing conflict in the Palestinian territory between Israel and Hamas. (AFP)
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High Risk of Famine Persists Across Gaza, Global Hunger Monitor Says 

Men and children search through debris in the yard of the Asma school run by the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA), in the Shati camp for Palestinian refugees west of Gaza City, in the aftermath of overnight Israeli bombardment on June 25, 2024 amid the ongoing conflict in the Palestinian territory between Israel and Hamas. (AFP)
Men and children search through debris in the yard of the Asma school run by the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA), in the Shati camp for Palestinian refugees west of Gaza City, in the aftermath of overnight Israeli bombardment on June 25, 2024 amid the ongoing conflict in the Palestinian territory between Israel and Hamas. (AFP)

A high risk of famine persists across the whole of the Gaza Strip as long as conflict between Israel and Hamas continues and humanitarian access remains restricted, a global hunger monitor said on Tuesday.

Over 495,000 people, or more than one fifth of Gaza's population, are facing the most severe, catastrophic level of food insecurity, said an update from the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC).

The IPC said increased deliveries of food and nutrition services to northern Gaza in March and April appeared to have reduced the severity of hunger in the area, where the UN-backed body had previously projected that famine was likely.

But Israel's offensive around the southern city of Rafah from early May and other hostilities and displacement have led to a renewed deterioration in recent weeks, it added.

"The humanitarian space in the Gaza Strip continues to shrink and the ability to safely deliver assistance to populations is dwindling. The recent trajectory is negative and highly unstable," the report said.

The Rafah offensive led to the closure of the crossing on Gaza's border with Egypt, which had been a main route for the delivery of food and other supplies, as well as an evacuation point for civilians who were critically ill or injured.

This factor, along with disruptions at the nearby Israeli crossing of Kerem Shalom, reduced humanitarian access to two million people in southern Gaza, the IPC said.

Within Gaza, displacement to areas with less water and fewer health services "increases the risk of disease outbreaks, which would have catastrophic effects on the nutritional and health status of large segments of the population", it said.

Israel's military campaign in Gaza was launched after Hamas-led fighters raided southern Israel on Oct. 7, killing around 1,200 people and seizing more than 250 hostages, according to Israeli tallies.

The Israeli response has killed almost 37,600 people, according to Palestinian health authorities, leaving Gaza in ruins and repeatedly displacing much of its population within the blockaded coastal territory.