Yemeni Government Suspends Participation in Hodeidah’s Redeployment Committee

Yemeni Foreign Minister Mohammad al-Hadhrami met with US ambassador to Yemen Christopher Henzel in Riyadh on Wednesday (saba news agency)
Yemeni Foreign Minister Mohammad al-Hadhrami met with US ambassador to Yemen Christopher Henzel in Riyadh on Wednesday (saba news agency)
TT

Yemeni Government Suspends Participation in Hodeidah’s Redeployment Committee

Yemeni Foreign Minister Mohammad al-Hadhrami met with US ambassador to Yemen Christopher Henzel in Riyadh on Wednesday (saba news agency)
Yemeni Foreign Minister Mohammad al-Hadhrami met with US ambassador to Yemen Christopher Henzel in Riyadh on Wednesday (saba news agency)

The Yemeni government announced that it has suspended its membership in the Hodeidah Redeployment Coordination Committee holding Houthi rebels responsible for the move.

Yemeni Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalik has warned that the militias' recent military escalation and recurrent breaches of the UN-sponsored ceasefire in Hodeidah would thwart the Stockholm Agreement.

During a phone conversation he held on Thursday with the head of the government team engaged in the Redeployment Coordination Committee (RCC), Maj. General Mohammed Aidhah, the PM said such violations clearly demonstrate that militia leaders have never seriously sought to achieve peace.

Abdulmalik’s remarks came a day after Yemeni Foreign Minister Mohammad al-Hadhrami made clear, during a meeting with US ambassador to Yemen Christopher Henzel in Riyadh, that the suspension is meant to review the feasibility of the Stockholm Agreement in light of the continued Houthi violations of the deal.

"The government had shown so much patience versus the Houthi maximalist avoidance of the Hodeidah Agreement for one year," the FM said.

Hadhrami called on the UN to assume its responsibility in ensuring the safety of the governmental team involved in implementing the Agreement.

During his phone call with Aidhah, the Yemeni PM inquired about the health of Colonel Mohammed Abdurrab Sharaf Al-Soleihi, a member of the government team that monitors the truce, who was shot by a Houthi sniper while on duty on Wednesday despite having been notified about his movement.

"Shooting Col. Al-Soleihi while on duty is a flagrant breach and serious act that threatens the Stockholm Agreement,” said Abdulmalik.

Under the UN-sponsored deal signed in December 2018 in the Swedish capital, the Iran-backed Houthis are compelled to defuse landmines and to withdraw from Hodeidah’s seaports and open roads from and to the city in exchange for the Yemeni government halting a major military offensive that had reached Hodeidah city.



Egypt Needs to Import $1.18 Billion in Fuel to End Power Cuts, PM Says

The moon is seen after the day of Strawberry Moon over old houses in Cairo, Egypt, June 22, 2024. (Reuters)
The moon is seen after the day of Strawberry Moon over old houses in Cairo, Egypt, June 22, 2024. (Reuters)
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Egypt Needs to Import $1.18 Billion in Fuel to End Power Cuts, PM Says

The moon is seen after the day of Strawberry Moon over old houses in Cairo, Egypt, June 22, 2024. (Reuters)
The moon is seen after the day of Strawberry Moon over old houses in Cairo, Egypt, June 22, 2024. (Reuters)

Egypt needs to import around $1.18 billion worth of mazut fuel oil and natural gas to end persistent power cuts exacerbated by consecutive heat waves, its Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouly said in a televised address on Tuesday.

It hopes the shipments will arrive in full around the third week of July, by which point the government aims to stop cutting power during the remaining summer months, he added.

It has already started contracting for 300,000 tons of mazut worth $180 million to boost its strategic reserves which are expected to arrive early next week.

Egypt's government on Monday extended daily power cuts to three hours from two hours previously in response to a surge in domestic electricity consumption during the latest heat wave.

These three-hour cuts will continue until the end of June, before returning to two hours in the first half of July with the aim of stopping completely for the rest of the summer, Madbouly said on Tuesday.

Egyptian social media has lit up with complaints about the impact of the blackouts, with some saying they have been forced to purchase private power generators.

The problem has particularly affected teenagers preparing for the crucial high school certificate, with some posting about students studying by candlelight and others in coffee shops.

A wedding hall owner in the coastal city of Port Said said he would turn one of his ballrooms into a study hall.

Since July last year, load shedding linked to falling gas production, rising demand and a shortage of foreign currency has led to scheduled two-hour daily power cuts in most areas.

"We had said that we planned to end load shedding by the end of 2024... we do not have a power generation problem or a network problem, we are unable to provide fuel," Madbouly said on Tuesday.

"With the increase in consumption related to the major development and population increase, there has been a lot of pressure on our dollar resources," he added.

He said production in a neighboring country's gas field had come to a full halt for 12 hours leading to an interruption in the supply, without naming the country or the gas field.

Egypt's Abu Qir Fertilizers said on Tuesday three of its plants had halted production because their supply of natural gas was cut.