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Amazing Snap of Mount Everest from Space

Amazing Snap of Mount Everest from Space

Saturday, 15 January, 2022 - 07:15
NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei snapped a stunning image of Mount Everest while aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

NASA astronaut snapped a stunning image of Mount Everest while soaring some 250 miles above Earth's surface. Mount Everest stands 29,032 feet high, making it nearly impossible to miss on Earth, according to The Daily Mail.


NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei snapped a stunning image of Mount Everest while aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that was soaring some 250 miles above Earth's surface. “My New Year's resolution is to get outside as much as possible. Well, after I land that is. Can you find Mt. Everest in this photo?” Vande Hei tweeted.


Many Twitter users shared their guesses in the comments of the image, with several right answers and others who did not even attempt to try due to it being nearly impossible. Mount Everest stretches across the China and Nepal borders and was first climbed by humans in 1953.


The image shows the massive Himalayas covered in snow and webbing across the landscape. From aboard the ISS, the Himalayas looks like tree roots spreading out from the ground. But if you look toward the middle of the image, you will spot Mount Everest.

Vande Hei arrived at the ISS in April, traveling with two Russian cosmonauts, Oleg Novitskly and Pyotr Dubrov.


Many astronauts have spent time on the ship snapping amazing images of Earth, one specifically was the European Space Agency's Thomas Pesquet. During his second mission on the ISS, which ran from April 2021 to November 2021, Pesquet took nearly 250,000 photos of the Earth, the ISS and surrounding cosmos.


In an interview with NASA on November 15, Pesquet says that he took a lot more photos this time around than his first time in space.


He says he captured over 245,000 photos during his trip, and the process to go through them is particularly daunting.


He adds that providing this much information was also personally important to him. “I grew up a fan of space flight and I was starved of information when I was younger,” Pesquet said.


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