Iran: Teachers Demand Fair Wages, Better Working Conditions

Picture published by the Iranian Teachers Unions Coordination Committee of the protests in Sanandaj, west Iran
Picture published by the Iranian Teachers Unions Coordination Committee of the protests in Sanandaj, west Iran
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Iran: Teachers Demand Fair Wages, Better Working Conditions

Picture published by the Iranian Teachers Unions Coordination Committee of the protests in Sanandaj, west Iran
Picture published by the Iranian Teachers Unions Coordination Committee of the protests in Sanandaj, west Iran

Teachers in Iran marched in several cities, including Tehran, to demand fair wages, better working conditions, and the release of their jailed colleagues.

The Iranian Teachers Unions Coordination Committee stated that teachers organized protests in front of the education departments' headquarters in about 50 Iranian cities.

The committee's spokesman, Mohammad Habibi, wrote on Twitter that the security forces had arrested 70 teachers in Tehran.

The committee said that due to the security measures in Qarni Street, the security forces prevented gatherings and arrested about 40 teachers, and transferred them to a detention center.

One of the detainees was an 80-year-old retired teacher. Later, a spokesman announced that the authorities released all 70 detained teachers.

In its statement, the Coordinating Committee demanded the immediate release of all detainees and the dismissal of the minister of education.

Earlier this week, an Iranian court convicted and sentenced Rasoul Badaghi, a member of the teachers' union, to five years in prison and banned him from residing in the capital, Tehran, or its neighboring provinces.

Badaghi was arrested last November after participating in a protest. He is among the former detainees of the Green Movement protests against electoral fraud in the 2009 presidential elections.

Badaghi was convicted in September 2009 and sentenced to six years in prison on charges of "propaganda against the regime."

The government and the parliament are facing criticism from lawmakers for their inability to curb price hikes.

Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi and Speaker Mohammad Bagher Ghalibaf blamed the previous government for the price hike.

Teachers chanted slogans against Ghalibaf, a former commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC).

Ghalibaf is facing criticism after photos of his wife, daughter, and son-in-law showed them at Istanbul airport.

The pictures were taken after an issue between the airline crew and Ghalibaf's daughter, who insisted on passing a shipment consisting of the baby's clothing.

Ghalibaf's eldest son, Elias, wrote on his Instagram account that the trip was undoubtedly an "unforgivable wrongdoing" given the economic conditions of the people, but he denied reports that the visit was to buy baby supplies.

The IRGC's Fars news agency said that the Ghalibaf family's visit to Turkey was not to buy baby supplies, asserting that the Speaker opposed his family's travel.

The reformist "Ibtikar" newspaper published a cartoon of the Speaker, while another daily demanded Ghalibaf to submit his resignation.

The case even divided the Speaker's allies, and his media advisor criticized what he described as including the "children's mistakes in the parents' record."

A video circulated online of a televised debate between Ghalibaf and former President Hassan Rouhani during the 2017 presidential elections.

During the debate, Ghalibaf blamed Rouhani after a minister's daughter imported children's clothing from Italy.



Netanyahu Receives Warning from Panel Probing Submarine Purchase 

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a state memorial ceremony at Nachalat Yitzhak cemetery in Tel Aviv on June 18, 2024. (AFP)
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a state memorial ceremony at Nachalat Yitzhak cemetery in Tel Aviv on June 18, 2024. (AFP)
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Netanyahu Receives Warning from Panel Probing Submarine Purchase 

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a state memorial ceremony at Nachalat Yitzhak cemetery in Tel Aviv on June 18, 2024. (AFP)
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a state memorial ceremony at Nachalat Yitzhak cemetery in Tel Aviv on June 18, 2024. (AFP)

An Israeli commission investigating suspected wrongdoing in government purchases of submarines and missile boats from Germany issued a warning to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday.

The panel notified Netanyahu that based on evidence gathered thus far, it could ultimately determine that he had used his position as prime minister between 2009 and 2016 to greenlight the purchases without due process.

"By doing so, he (Netanyahu) endangered the security of the state and harmed the state of Israel's foreign relations and economic interests," said the panel in its written decision, made public on Monday.

Netanyahu in response said that the submarines were central to Israel's security "in ensuring its existence against Iran, which is trying to destroy us".

"History will prove that Prime Minister Netanyahu was right on this issue as well and made the right decisions for the security of Israel," the statement from his office said.

The commission, established under the previous government in 2022, said that it will soon publish unclassified parts of the evidence collected during the probe into the deal, worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

Netanyahu has struggled to salvage his security credentials since the Oct. 7 attack by Hamas-led fighters, who killed 1,200 people and took more than 250 hostages to Gaza according to Israeli tallies, the worst attack on Jews since the Holocaust.

In the Israeli assault on Gaza that followed, more than 37,000 people have been killed according to Gaza health authorities.