Two New Brotherhood Administrations, Leaderships Provoke Egypt’s Political Circles

Mohammed Badie, former Muslim Brotherhood leader, in prison (File photo: Reuters)
Mohammed Badie, former Muslim Brotherhood leader, in prison (File photo: Reuters)
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Two New Brotherhood Administrations, Leaderships Provoke Egypt’s Political Circles

Mohammed Badie, former Muslim Brotherhood leader, in prison (File photo: Reuters)
Mohammed Badie, former Muslim Brotherhood leader, in prison (File photo: Reuters)

The recent developments within the Muslim Brotherhood, which Egypt classifies as a terrorist organization, have preoccupied the political circles, especially with the battle over leadership.

The competition became apparent after the recent decisions that led to establishment of two administrations and two acting guides in London and Istanbul.

Islamist specialists discussed the conflict between "London Front" and the "Istanbul Group" and the expected scenario.

The Istanbul Front appointed Mahmoud Hussein as acting guide, and hours later, the London Front responded by naming Moheddine al-Zait as their chief.

Earlier, London Front acting leader Ibrahim Munir dissolved the Administrative Office for Organization Affairs in Turkey and formed a supreme body as an alternative to the Brotherhood’s Guidance Office.

The crisis heightened after the London Front formed a new Shura Council, dismissing six members of the Istanbul Shura, including Hussein himself. The Istanbul Shura Council formed the "Acting Committee of the General Shura" led by Mustafa Tolba and dismissed Munir from his position.

In response, the London Front dismissed Tolba, declaring in a statement that it “did not recognize the decisions of the Istanbul Front or the so-called General Shura Council.”

Egyptian Islamist researcher Ahmed Sultan was not surprised by the recent development and said it was an extension of the dispute that began in 2020 within the organization, explaining that it was a structural division that reached the international organization.

Sultan told Asharq Al-Awsat that each front is seeking to lead the organization, adding that the division intensified between the two sides, and the differences deepened.

Last June, the Guidance Office met in London without Hussein. It issued a statement stressing the need to pledge allegiance to Munir in his capacity as an acting guide.

Sultan reported that Hussein was asked to solve his issues with the London group and acknowledge Munir as the acting guide, who refused and established a global organization and appointed Hammam Ali Yusef as its secretary general.

The expert confirmed that Hussein’s appointment was rightful regarding regulation, but the dispute involved managing the organization’s assets and funds.

The London Front viewed Hussein’s group as a dissident. Munir chose three deputies before his death, but they have not made a selection, which created a regulatory problem because Muni was not the organization’s guide.

The issue was whether the Chargé d’Affairs had the right to choose his deputy or deputies so that one could assume his duties in his absence or death.

Munir formed a committee to justify the procedure legally, and his measure was settled. The next step was for the General Shura Council in London to agree on one of the three deputies, but the council did not meet.

Sultan also explained that Hussein, after Munir's death, presented an initiative to regroup the organization and reached out to some leaders in London, but they refused.

Hussein activated Article 5 of the regulation by assuming the position while the London Front was still preparing to choose an official representative of the guide, according to the expert.

Sultan said that it was likely that the London front will likely choose Buhairi, and if that happened, there would be two guides for the Brotherhood for the first time in the history of the organization.

Meanwhile, Islamist researcher Ahmed Zaghloul told Asharq Al-Awsat that the conflict within the organization is intensifying, and it may deepen further if the London Front fails to choose an acting leader formally.

Zaghloul stressed that having two leaders as the acting guide would increase and deepen the conflict, which could lead to escalatory measures.

Asked about the form of leadership within the organization, the researcher explained there were three: London, Istanbul, and the Movement for Change, and two groups: the first, whose memberships are frozen, and the Egyptian domestic group.

He also noted that the position of the prison leaders regarding the developments remains unknown.

London front announced earlier that imprisoned leaders support Munir. Still, it did not resolve the dispute within the Brotherhood, said Zaghloul, noting that they might side with Hussein or that the London front might delay naming its leader to obtain their support and approval.



UN Human Rights Chief: Situation in West Bank 'Drastically Deteriorating'

Palestinian Muslims gather at the Al-Aqsa mosques compound in Jerusalem, with the Dome of the Rock in the background, on the first day of the Eid al-Adha holiday marking the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Makkah, on June 16, 2024. (PAFP)
Palestinian Muslims gather at the Al-Aqsa mosques compound in Jerusalem, with the Dome of the Rock in the background, on the first day of the Eid al-Adha holiday marking the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Makkah, on June 16, 2024. (PAFP)
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UN Human Rights Chief: Situation in West Bank 'Drastically Deteriorating'

Palestinian Muslims gather at the Al-Aqsa mosques compound in Jerusalem, with the Dome of the Rock in the background, on the first day of the Eid al-Adha holiday marking the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Makkah, on June 16, 2024. (PAFP)
Palestinian Muslims gather at the Al-Aqsa mosques compound in Jerusalem, with the Dome of the Rock in the background, on the first day of the Eid al-Adha holiday marking the end of the Hajj pilgrimage to Makkah, on June 16, 2024. (PAFP)

The United Nations human rights chief on Tuesday warned that the rights situation in the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, was drastically deteriorating, while there had been "unconscionable death and suffering" in Gaza.

"The situation in the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, is dramatically deteriorating," said Volker Turk, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

He said that as of June 15, 528 Palestinians, 133 of them children, had been killed by Israeli security forces or settlers since October, in some cases raising "serious concerns of unlawful killings."