Police Detain Two People at Shanghai Protest Site

This frame grab from eyewitness video footage made available via AFPTV on November 27, 2022. AFP
This frame grab from eyewitness video footage made available via AFPTV on November 27, 2022. AFP
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Police Detain Two People at Shanghai Protest Site

This frame grab from eyewitness video footage made available via AFPTV on November 27, 2022. AFP
This frame grab from eyewitness video footage made available via AFPTV on November 27, 2022. AFP

Chinese police detained two people on Monday at a site in Shanghai where demonstrators gathered over the weekend to protest Covid-19 lockdowns and call for greater political freedoms, an AFP journalist witnessed.

When asked why one of the people was taken away, a policeman told AFP "because he didn't obey our arrangements" and then referred the reporter to police.

Police were also pulling people aside and ordering them to delete photos from their phones. 

Large crowds had gathered Sunday in the downtown area, with police clashing with protesters as they tried to stop groups from converging at Wulumuqi street, named after the Mandarin for Urumqi.

AFP journalists saw several people detained on Sunday evening, and multiple witnesses saw people taken away in earlier protests too. 

Shanghai police had not responded on Monday to repeated enquiries about how many people had been detained. 

Roads that were closed Sunday night after the protests had been reopened in the morning.

The police presence had decreased, but the streets were covered with blue barriers which AFP witnessed being erected overnight.  

AFP saw one man who took a picture of the Wulumuqi street sign having a protracted discussion with a police officer. 



Stockholm Accuses Iran of Using Criminals in Sweden to Target Israel

A police vehicle on patrol in Sweden. Reuters file photo
A police vehicle on patrol in Sweden. Reuters file photo
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Stockholm Accuses Iran of Using Criminals in Sweden to Target Israel

A police vehicle on patrol in Sweden. Reuters file photo
A police vehicle on patrol in Sweden. Reuters file photo

Sweden's domestic security agency on Thursday accused Iran of using established criminal networks in Sweden as a proxy to target Israeli or Jewish interests in the Scandinavian country.
The accusations were raised at a news conference by Daniel Stenling, the head of the SAPO agency's counterespionage unit, following a series of events earlier this year.
In late January, the Israeli Embassy in Stockholm was sealed off after what was then described as “a dangerous object” was found on the grounds of the diplomatic mission in an eastern Stockholm neighborhood. Swedish media said the object was a hand grenade.
The embassy was not evacuated and the object was eventually destroyed. No arrests were made and authorities did not say what was found. On May 17, gunshots were heard near the Israeli Embassy in Stockholm and the area was cordoned off. No one was arrested.
According to The Associated Press, Stenling said, without offering specifics or evidence to back up his assertion, that the agency "can establish that criminal networks in Sweden are used as a proxy by Iran.”
“It is very much about planning and attempts to carry out attacks against Israeli and Jewish interests, goals and activities in Sweden," he said and added that the agency sees "connections between criminal individuals in the criminal networks and individuals who are connected to the Iranian security services.”
Justice Minister Gunnar Strömmer and Hampus Nygårds, deputy head of the Swedish police's National Operations Department, were also at the online news conference with Stenling.
“We see this connection between the Iranian intelligence services, the security services and precisely criminals in the criminal networks in Sweden," Stenling said. “We see that connection and it also means that we need to work much more internationally to get to the crimes and be able to prevent them.”
Stenling and the others made no mention of the recent incidents connected to the Israel Embassy and stopped short of naming any criminal groups or suspects.
Sweden has grappled with gang violence for years and criminal gangs often recruit teenagers in socially disadvantaged immigrant neighborhoods to carry out hits.
By May 15, police have recorded 85 shootings so far this year, including 12 fatal shootings. Last year, 53 people were killed and 109 were wounded in a total of 363 shootings.