Egyptian Cabinet to Benefit from Former Headquarters in Investment

Madbouly follows up efforts to benefit from state headquarters across the country. (Egyptian government)
Madbouly follows up efforts to benefit from state headquarters across the country. (Egyptian government)
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Egyptian Cabinet to Benefit from Former Headquarters in Investment

Madbouly follows up efforts to benefit from state headquarters across the country. (Egyptian government)
Madbouly follows up efforts to benefit from state headquarters across the country. (Egyptian government)

The Egyptian government seeks to benefit from its former headquarters following the transfer of ministries into the New Administrative Capital.

Egyptian Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouly stressed the government’s keenness on continuous follow-up of the state assets and on taking necessary steps to optimize them.

The PM noted that there are reports on several assets across the Egyptian provinces, including many proposals and recommendations on exploiting these assets by issuing them for investment by the private sector to achieve more returns.

Madbouly held a meeting on Thursday to follow up on optimizing the state assets. The meeting was attended by several ministers.

Egyptian government spokesperson Nader Saad said the meeting touched on some of the assets in the provinces of Cairo and Giza that overlook the Nile River in order to optimize them by issuing them for investment.

Last month, Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi met with Madbouly and cabinet members at the Strategic Leadership Center in the New Administrative Capital.

The spokesman for the Presidency, Ahmed Fahmy, stated that the meeting discussed the government's plan to relocate ministries and various state agencies and institutions to the new capital.

According to the spokesman, Sisi directed intensifying efforts to ensure the government's move to the capital was smooth.

He noted that it could only be achieved through the modernization of buildings and premises and the qualification of workers, and providing training programs to government personnel to teach them modern methods of administration.

"These efforts, in turn, would contribute to establishing an efficient and effective administrative body," he said.

Moreover, Saad added that the meeting pointed out that the Sovereign Fund of Egypt would start evaluating the assets which were showcased during the meeting and the buildings and lands they have.

The assessment will be based on global assessors for the sake of marketing the assets and establishing investment projects on them, especially since these lands are in unique regions on the Nile River.



High Risk of Famine Persists Across Gaza, Global Hunger Monitor Says 

Men and children search through debris in the yard of the Asma school run by the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA), in the Shati camp for Palestinian refugees west of Gaza City, in the aftermath of overnight Israeli bombardment on June 25, 2024 amid the ongoing conflict in the Palestinian territory between Israel and Hamas. (AFP)
Men and children search through debris in the yard of the Asma school run by the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA), in the Shati camp for Palestinian refugees west of Gaza City, in the aftermath of overnight Israeli bombardment on June 25, 2024 amid the ongoing conflict in the Palestinian territory between Israel and Hamas. (AFP)
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High Risk of Famine Persists Across Gaza, Global Hunger Monitor Says 

Men and children search through debris in the yard of the Asma school run by the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA), in the Shati camp for Palestinian refugees west of Gaza City, in the aftermath of overnight Israeli bombardment on June 25, 2024 amid the ongoing conflict in the Palestinian territory between Israel and Hamas. (AFP)
Men and children search through debris in the yard of the Asma school run by the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA), in the Shati camp for Palestinian refugees west of Gaza City, in the aftermath of overnight Israeli bombardment on June 25, 2024 amid the ongoing conflict in the Palestinian territory between Israel and Hamas. (AFP)

A high risk of famine persists across the whole of the Gaza Strip as long as conflict between Israel and Hamas continues and humanitarian access remains restricted, a global hunger monitor said on Tuesday.

Over 495,000 people, or more than one fifth of Gaza's population, are facing the most severe, catastrophic level of food insecurity, said an update from the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC).

The IPC said increased deliveries of food and nutrition services to northern Gaza in March and April appeared to have reduced the severity of hunger in the area, where the UN-backed body had previously projected that famine was likely.

But Israel's offensive around the southern city of Rafah from early May and other hostilities and displacement have led to a renewed deterioration in recent weeks, it added.

"The humanitarian space in the Gaza Strip continues to shrink and the ability to safely deliver assistance to populations is dwindling. The recent trajectory is negative and highly unstable," the report said.

The Rafah offensive led to the closure of the crossing on Gaza's border with Egypt, which had been a main route for the delivery of food and other supplies, as well as an evacuation point for civilians who were critically ill or injured.

This factor, along with disruptions at the nearby Israeli crossing of Kerem Shalom, reduced humanitarian access to two million people in southern Gaza, the IPC said.

Within Gaza, displacement to areas with less water and fewer health services "increases the risk of disease outbreaks, which would have catastrophic effects on the nutritional and health status of large segments of the population", it said.

Israel's military campaign in Gaza was launched after Hamas-led fighters raided southern Israel on Oct. 7, killing around 1,200 people and seizing more than 250 hostages, according to Israeli tallies.

The Israeli response has killed almost 37,600 people, according to Palestinian health authorities, leaving Gaza in ruins and repeatedly displacing much of its population within the blockaded coastal territory.