Portugal Moves Closer to Banning Chinese Suppliers from 5G

People waiting at the bust stand near the 'MY 5G' advert on a LED screen in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 03 May 2023.  EPA/FAZRY ISMAIL
People waiting at the bust stand near the 'MY 5G' advert on a LED screen in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 03 May 2023. EPA/FAZRY ISMAIL
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Portugal Moves Closer to Banning Chinese Suppliers from 5G

People waiting at the bust stand near the 'MY 5G' advert on a LED screen in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 03 May 2023.  EPA/FAZRY ISMAIL
People waiting at the bust stand near the 'MY 5G' advert on a LED screen in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 03 May 2023. EPA/FAZRY ISMAIL

Portugal's cybersecurity council CSSC has issued a resolution that could formally bar telecom operators from using Chinese equipment in their high-speed 5G mobile networks as well 4G platforms on which the new technology is based.

The CSSC is the prime minister's consultative body and its document, dated May 23, is another blow to efforts by Chinese technology giant Huawei to enter the 5G market in Portugal and possibly extend existing contracts, Reuters reported.

Under a law approved last August, the government can determine "the exclusion, restrictions on use, or the cessation of use of equipment or services" of telecom companies, setting conditions and deadlines for operators to comply.

The government had no immediate comment.

The country's main operators, Altice, NOS and Vodafone have already said they will not use Huawei's equipment in 5G core networks, amid European and US concerns that Chinese involvement in critical infrastructure could compromise security. Beijing and Huawei reject such suggestions.

Portugal's existing 5G networks are not standalone and still largely based on 4G technology and equipment.

Without mentioning China or any Chinese suppliers by name, the CSSC warned of a "high risk" to security from suppliers or providers that "are headquartered in a country where the government exercises control, interference or pressure on its activities in third countries".

Its opinion is based on an undisclosed report that evaluated the safety of equipment in public electronic communications networks involving 5G technology.

It also cited security risks when the country where a supplier is based has no agreements on data protection, cybersecurity or protection of intellectual property with Portugal or the European Union, or when it is not an EU, NATO or OECD member.

Huawei said in a statement it had "no prior knowledge of, and hasn't been consulted about this matter" and it was still gathering information "on the nature of the assessment" and hoped to continue serving Portuguese clients.

Europe has emerged as a battleground in the technology rivalry between Beijing and Washington and Huawei's European competitors, Ericsson and Nokia, could become a supplier duopoly if the Chinese company were shut out.



Report: AI Can Help Shipping Industry Cut Down Emissions

Artificial Intelligence words are seen in this illustration taken March 31, 2023. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration
Artificial Intelligence words are seen in this illustration taken March 31, 2023. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration
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Report: AI Can Help Shipping Industry Cut Down Emissions

Artificial Intelligence words are seen in this illustration taken March 31, 2023. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration
Artificial Intelligence words are seen in this illustration taken March 31, 2023. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

The global commercial shipping industry could cut down its carbon emissions by 47 million tons per year by deploying artificial intelligence for sea navigation, a study by autonomous shipping startup Orca AI showed on Tuesday.
The use of the technology could reduce the need for maneuvers and route deviation from close encounters with high-risk marine targets such as vessels, buoys and sea mammals by alerting the crew in real time, according to the report.
WHY IT IS IMPORTANT
Shipping, responsible for moving about 90% of global trade, contributes nearly 3% to the world's carbon dioxide emissions. This share is anticipated to rise in the coming years unless stricter pollution control measures are implemented.
The International Maritime Organization aims to cut emissions by 20% by 2030, a target under threat from the ongoing Red Sea crisis.
KEY QUOTE
"In the short term, it can lead to fewer crew members on the bridge, while those who are on the bridge will have a reduced workload and more attention to tackle complex navigational tasks, optimizing the voyage and reducing fuel and emissions," Orca AI CEO Yarden Gross told Reuters.
"In the long term, it will open the door to fully autonomous shipping."
CONTEXT
Global carbon dioxide shipping emissions reached an estimated 858 million tons in 2022, a marginal rise from the previous year, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.
An average of 2,976 marine incidents are reported per year, Orca AI's study showed.
BY THE NUMBERS
The reduction in route deviations could help ships shave off 38.2 million nautical miles per year from their travel, saving an average of $100,000 in fuel costs per vessel, according to Orca AI's report.
AI could also lower close encounters by 33% in open waters, it said.