British Artist Turner Captured the 'Planet's Turning Point' in His Paintings

Shields, on the River Tyne, 1823 (TATE)
Shields, on the River Tyne, 1823 (TATE)
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British Artist Turner Captured the 'Planet's Turning Point' in His Paintings

Shields, on the River Tyne, 1823 (TATE)
Shields, on the River Tyne, 1823 (TATE)

A new exhibition is to examine how British artist JMW Turner unknowingly captured the permanent impact people were having on the environment in his paintings.

A World of Care will see the landscape painter's works presented alongside modern examples of environmental issues to show how he captured changes to his world that would alter the climate forever, BBC reported.

Explaining the display, curator Dr Thomas Ardill said in creating his landscapes, Turner had unwittingly been "recording the early stages of climate and ecological breakdown as he travelled across Britain and Europe".

The exhibition at Turner's House, the painter's former retreat in Twickenham, south-west London, opens on 6 July.

Joseph Mallord William Turner was born in London in 1775 and became what many consider to be one of Britain's greatest Romantic artists.

Known as "the painter of light", he created landscapes and seascapes that often reflected changes to the landscape and atmosphere caused by human activity, particularly as a result of the industrial revolution.

"Turner painted the turning point in our planet's modern history," argues TV presenter and conservationist Chris Packham.

"His ‘Rain, Steam and Speed’ sees a smoking locomotive at the vanguard of the industrial revolution, howling out of the fug.

"His sunsets are vivid, his skies torrid - he captures the cusp of change."

According to BBC, the exhibition will see works like Sunset, London from Greenwich, and Shields, on the River Tyne, go on display.

The World of Care exhibition runs from from 6 July to 27 October.



Restored Imam Turki bin Abdullah Royal Reserve Thrives with Wildlife

Covering a vast 91,500 square kilometers, the Imam Turki bin Abdullah Royal Reserve is a treasure trove of biodiversity. SPA
Covering a vast 91,500 square kilometers, the Imam Turki bin Abdullah Royal Reserve is a treasure trove of biodiversity. SPA
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Restored Imam Turki bin Abdullah Royal Reserve Thrives with Wildlife

Covering a vast 91,500 square kilometers, the Imam Turki bin Abdullah Royal Reserve is a treasure trove of biodiversity. SPA
Covering a vast 91,500 square kilometers, the Imam Turki bin Abdullah Royal Reserve is a treasure trove of biodiversity. SPA

The Imam Turki bin Abdullah Royal Reserve is breathing new life into northeastern Saudi Arabia. In line with Vision 2030 and the Saudi Green Initiative, the reserve is returning to its natural splendor and witnesses a return of wildlife populations, the Saudi Press Agency reported on Saturday.
An ambitious project focused on reintroducing and increasing the numbers of iconic species, like the Arabian oryx, sand gazelle, Houbara bustard, and red-necked ostrich. The flourishing vegetation cover has become a haven for a diverse range of birds, which are vital to preserving the balance of the ecosystem by controlling insects, small rodents, and carrion, SPA said.
Bird-nesting activity has been observed, alongside a return of sand cats, wild cats, foxes, honey badgers, and desert hedgehogs.
The reserve is also seeing a resurgence of reptiles like lizards and snakes, alongside a thriving insect population, SPA said.
Covering a vast 91,500 square kilometers, the Imam Turki bin Abdullah Royal Reserve is a treasure trove of biodiversity. It boasts unique varieties of plant, including large trees, shrubs, and a year-round perennial plant cover. The reserve even harbors a collection of plants with valuable medicinal and aromatic properties.
The large-scale restoration effort is transforming the reserve into a flourishing natural haven, demonstrating Saudi Arabia's commitment to conserving the environment for future generations.