2.2 Million Pilgrims Transported by Al Mashaaer Al Mugaddassah Metro Line

2.2 Million Pilgrims Transported by Al Mashaaer Al Mugaddassah Metro Line
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2.2 Million Pilgrims Transported by Al Mashaaer Al Mugaddassah Metro Line

2.2 Million Pilgrims Transported by Al Mashaaer Al Mugaddassah Metro Line

Saudi Arabia Railways (SAR) announced the successful operation of Al Mashaaer Al Mugaddassah Metro Line during this year's Hajj season, with the train transporting over 2.2 million pilgrims on 2,206 trips across the nine stations in Arafat, Muzdalifah, and Mina.
The train operated for seven days, starting on the seventh of Dhu al-Hijjah and continuing until the end of the Days of Tashreeq. Over 29,000 pilgrims were transported on the first day, SPA reported.

The movement from Mina to Arafat saw the highest volume with over 292,000 pilgrims ferried by the train. It then facilitated the movement of over 305,000 pilgrims from Arafat to Muzdalifah, followed by over 383,000 on their return journey from Muzdalifah back to Mina.
During the Days of Tashreeq, the Al Mashaaer Al Mugaddassah Metro Line played a vital role in transporting over 1.2 million pilgrims from Mina stations (1, 2 & Muzdalifah 3) to Mina 3 station (Jamarat), facilitating their easy access to the Jamarat Bridge.
The CEO of SAR, Dr. Bashar bin Khalid Al-Malik, attributed the success of the operation to the unwavering support from the Saudi leadership. The support, he highlighted, was instrumental in SAR's ability to serve pilgrims effectively through both Al Mashaaer Al Mugaddassah Metro Line and the Haramain High-Speed Railway.



UN Demands Action on Extreme Heat as World Registers Warmest Day

 A child cools off nearby sprinklers at Retiro Park during the second day of the heatwave, in Madrid, Spain July 25, 2024. (Reuters)
A child cools off nearby sprinklers at Retiro Park during the second day of the heatwave, in Madrid, Spain July 25, 2024. (Reuters)
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UN Demands Action on Extreme Heat as World Registers Warmest Day

 A child cools off nearby sprinklers at Retiro Park during the second day of the heatwave, in Madrid, Spain July 25, 2024. (Reuters)
A child cools off nearby sprinklers at Retiro Park during the second day of the heatwave, in Madrid, Spain July 25, 2024. (Reuters)

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres called on Thursday for countries to address the urgency of the extreme heat epidemic, fueled by climate change - days after the world registered its hottest day on record.

"Extreme heat is the new abnormal," Guterres said. "The world must rise to the challenge of rising temperatures," he said.

Climate change is making heatwaves more frequent, more intense and longer lasting across the world.

Already this year, scorching conditions have killed 1,300 hajj pilgrims, closed schools for some 80 million children in Africa and Asia, and led to a spike in hospitalizations and deaths in the Sahel.

Every month since June 2023 has now ranked as the planet's warmest since records began in 1940, compared with the corresponding month in previous years, according the European Union's Copernicus Climate Change Service.

The UN called on governments to not only tamp down fossil fuel emissions - the driver of climate change - but to bolster protections for the most vulnerable, including the elderly, pregnant women and children, and step up safeguards for workers.

Over 70 percent of the global workforce - 2.4 billion people - are now at high risk of extreme heat, according to a report from the International Labour Organization (ILO) published Thursday.

In Africa, nearly 93 percent of the workforce is exposed to excessive heat, and 84 percent of the Arab States' workforce, the ILO report found.

Excessive heat has been blamed for causing almost 23 million workplace injuries worldwide, and some 19,000 deaths annually.

"We need measures to protect workers, grounded in human rights," Guterres said.

He also called for governments to "heatproof" their economies, critical sectors such as healthcare, and the built environment.

Cities are warming at twice the worldwide average rate due to rapid urbanization and the urban heat island effect.

By 2050, some researchers estimate a 700 percent global increase in the number of urban poor living in extreme heat conditions.

This is the first time the UN has put out a global call for action on extreme heat.

"We need a policy signal and this is it," said Kathy Baughman Mcleod, CEO of Climate Resilience for All, a nonprofit focused on extreme heat.

"It's recognition of how big it is and how urgent it is. It's also recognition that everybody doesn't feel in the same way and pay the same price for it."