Oil Depots on Fire in Russia's Rostov Region after Drone Attack

Members of the Russian emergencies ministry work to extinguish fire at an oil storage tank after an alleged drone attack in the town of Azov in the southern region of Rostov, Russia, June 18, 2024, in this still image taken from video. Russian Emergencies Ministry/Handout via REUTERS
Members of the Russian emergencies ministry work to extinguish fire at an oil storage tank after an alleged drone attack in the town of Azov in the southern region of Rostov, Russia, June 18, 2024, in this still image taken from video. Russian Emergencies Ministry/Handout via REUTERS
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Oil Depots on Fire in Russia's Rostov Region after Drone Attack

Members of the Russian emergencies ministry work to extinguish fire at an oil storage tank after an alleged drone attack in the town of Azov in the southern region of Rostov, Russia, June 18, 2024, in this still image taken from video. Russian Emergencies Ministry/Handout via REUTERS
Members of the Russian emergencies ministry work to extinguish fire at an oil storage tank after an alleged drone attack in the town of Azov in the southern region of Rostov, Russia, June 18, 2024, in this still image taken from video. Russian Emergencies Ministry/Handout via REUTERS

Several oil storage tanks were on fire after a drone attack early on Tuesday in the town of Azov in Russia's southern region of Rostov, officials said.
"According to preliminary data, there are no casualties," Vasily Golubev, governor of the Rostov region that borders Ukraine, wrote on the Telegram messaging app.
Russia's ministry of emergency situations said on Telegram that the fire had spread across 5,000 cubic meters, and that several dozen firefighters with 21 pieces of equipment were battling the blaze.
Reuters could not independently verify the reports. There was no immediate comment from Ukraine. Kyiv has often said that targeting Russia's energy, military and transport infrastructure undermines Moscow's war effort.
The town of Azov is situated on the Don River and is about 16 kilometers from the Sea of Azov.



Despite Curfew, Deaths Mount in Bangladesh Student Protests

Commuters move along the road as Bangladesh soldiers stand guard following a curfew and the deployment of military forces in Dhaka on July 20, 2024. (Photo by Munir UZ ZAMAN / AFP)
Commuters move along the road as Bangladesh soldiers stand guard following a curfew and the deployment of military forces in Dhaka on July 20, 2024. (Photo by Munir UZ ZAMAN / AFP)
TT

Despite Curfew, Deaths Mount in Bangladesh Student Protests

Commuters move along the road as Bangladesh soldiers stand guard following a curfew and the deployment of military forces in Dhaka on July 20, 2024. (Photo by Munir UZ ZAMAN / AFP)
Commuters move along the road as Bangladesh soldiers stand guard following a curfew and the deployment of military forces in Dhaka on July 20, 2024. (Photo by Munir UZ ZAMAN / AFP)

Police imposed a strict curfew across Bangladesh and military forces patrolled parts of the capital Saturday to quell further violence after days of clashes over the allocation of government jobs left several people dead and hundreds injured.
The curfew follows the deadliest day yet in the weeks of protests despite a ban on public gatherings. Reports vary on the number of people killed Friday, with Somoy TV reporting 43. An Associated Press reporter saw 23 bodies at Dhaka Medical College and Hospital, but it was not immediately clear whether they all died on Friday.
Another 22 people died Thursday as protesting students attempted to impose a “complete shutdown” of the country. Several people were also killed Tuesday and Wednesday.
The protests, which began weeks ago but escalated sharply when violence erupted Tuesday, represent the biggest challenge to Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina since she won a fourth consecutive term in office after elections in January that were boycotted by the main opposition groups.
Police and protesters clashed in the streets and at university campuses in Dhaka and other cities across the south Asian country. Authorities moved to block online communications by banning mobile and internet services. Some television news channels also went off the air, and the websites of most Bangladesh newspapers were not loading or were being updated.
The curfew began at midnight and is set to relax from noon to 2 p.m. to allow people to buy essentials before being put back in place until 10 a.m. Sunday. A “shoot-at-sight” order was also in place, giving security forces the authority to fire on mobs in extreme cases, said lawmaker Obaidul Quader, the general secretary of the ruling Awami League party.

The protesters are demanding an end to a quota system that reserves up to 30% of government jobs for relatives of veterans who fought in Bangladesh’s war of independence in 1971 against Pakistan. They argue the system is discriminatory and benefits supporters of Hasina, whose Awami League party led the independence movement, and they want it replaced with a merit-based system.

Hasina has defended the quota system, saying that veterans deserve the highest respect for their contributions to the war, regardless of their political affiliation.

Representatives from the both sides met late Friday to find a resolution. At least three student leaders were part of the meeting in which they demanded a reform in the quota system, an opening of student dormitories across the country and the stepping down of university officials for failing to prevent violence on the campuses.
Law Minister Anisul Huq said the government was open to discussing the student leaders’ demands.

The protests are also backed by the main opposition Bangladesh Nationalist Party that has vowed to organize its own demonstrations with many of its supporters joining in the students’ protests.