Sudanese Sovereignty Council Member: Jeddah Platform Key for Peace

Representatives of the Sudanese conflict parties during the signing of the Jeddah Agreement in May 2023 (Reuters)
Representatives of the Sudanese conflict parties during the signing of the Jeddah Agreement in May 2023 (Reuters)
TT

Sudanese Sovereignty Council Member: Jeddah Platform Key for Peace

Representatives of the Sudanese conflict parties during the signing of the Jeddah Agreement in May 2023 (Reuters)
Representatives of the Sudanese conflict parties during the signing of the Jeddah Agreement in May 2023 (Reuters)

Sudan’s new Sovereignty Council member, Salaheddin Adam Tour, said on Friday he was assigned his role under “extremely complex” circumstances and is waiting to officially take over his duties.
In an exclusive interview with the Arab World News Agency, Tour denied any existing peace plan between the Sudanese army and the Rapid Support Forces (RSF).
“There is no sign of peace yet,” he said. “However, the state has a comprehensive plan to achieve peace,” referring to the agreements from the “Jeddah Platform.”
Tour said he doesn't yet know which tasks he’ll be given, as this decision rests with the state.
Regarding his goals as a council member, Tour said: “We aim to improve living conditions and reduce the suffering of people in camps and those displaced abroad.”
“Our government is working hard to support the armed forces, restore stability in Sudan, and bring back refugees and displaced people forced to flee due to the war,” he added.
On Thursday, army chief General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan issued a decree appointing Tour to the Sovereignty Council, representing the Sudan Liberation Movement - Transitional Council (SLM-TC).
This appointment is part of the Juba Peace Agreement implementation.
On Friday, the Sudanese government reaffirmed its commitment to the Jeddah Declaration and international humanitarian law, emphasizing the protection of civilians.
It stated that the armed forces are dedicated to their constitutional role in defending the country and respecting international rules of engagement.
Sudan’s Foreign Ministry announced that the government will facilitate visas for UN personnel and humanitarian workers.
The ministry also pledged to work with the international community to ensure humanitarian aid reaches those in need, following national and UN guidelines.
Additionally, the ministry dismissed concerns about an imminent famine, citing reports from the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and Sudan’s Ministry of Agriculture that confirm the country’s food reserves are sufficient to meet citizens’ needs.



Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
TT

Sudan's RSF Agrees with UN on Steps to Ease Aid Delivery

Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese farmers plow a field on the outskirts of Sudan's eastern city of Gedaref on July 18, 2024. (Photo by AFP)

Sudan's Rapid Support Forces agreed with the United Nations on some steps to ease aid delivery in areas under its control, a member of the RSF told Reuters on Thursday.

The Sudanese army has not reached any understandings on aid delivers with the RSF, he added. It is unclear if these steps could be implemented without the army's participation.

Meanwhile, a key supply route into Sudan's Darfur region, deemed at risk of famine by a global monitor, has been cut off due to heavy rains, a World Food Program official told Reuters on Thursday.
The UN agency has described Sudan as the world's biggest hunger crisis, with the western Darfur region most at risk as Sudan's 15-month civil war that has displaced millions and sparked ethnic violence grinds on.
WFP's Country Director Eddie Rowe said thousands of tons of aid are stranded at the Tina crossing on the Chad border, prompting the body to reopen talks with the army-aligned government to open an alternative, all-weather crossing further south called Adre.
"You have these huge rivers. As I speak now, our convoy, which is supposed to move over 2000 metric tons is stranded," he told Reuters from Port Sudan. Asked on the status of the talks that resumed this week, he said: "It's 50/50.”
WFP is now seeking clearances to move a large 70-truck convoy via a little-used, over 1000 kilometer route from Port Sudan to Darfur which Rowe said will involve crossing the battle lines of both the Sudan Armed Forces, the Rapid Support Forces and various militias.
He added that this mostly desert route has worked in the past but outside of the rainy season and that the last journey took weeks and was "fraught with a lot of challenges.”
In a separate interview, Mona Rishmawi, a member of the UN Fact-Finding Mission on Sudan, told Reuters that she had met Darfur refugees in Chad who told her stories of escaping with virtually no water and eating grass along the route. "There's no doubt that people are starving," she said.