NEOM Shares its Vision for Future of Cities in Venice Exhibition

The exhibition runs from May 20-September 24, at Abbazia di San Gregorio
The exhibition runs from May 20-September 24, at Abbazia di San Gregorio
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NEOM Shares its Vision for Future of Cities in Venice Exhibition

The exhibition runs from May 20-September 24, at Abbazia di San Gregorio
The exhibition runs from May 20-September 24, at Abbazia di San Gregorio

The historic Abbazia di San Gregorio in Venice will be home to a landmark exhibition entitled, ‘Zero Gravity Urbanism - Principles for a New Livability’.

The exhibition features the proposals of world-leading architects sharing their work on Saudi Arabia's THE LINE and their contribution to this urban revolution. Contributors include Morphosis, Sir Peter Cook, UNStudio, Fuksas, Oyler Wu, DMAA, and Adjaye, among others.

Zero Gravity Urbanism proposes a radical and progressive approach to cities with a sharper view toward balancing nature, livability, and human progress. The proposed model tackles urban sprawl and climate change. In contrast to city development of the last century, it provides a sustainable model that responds to the world’s most pressing environmental and urban challenges while addressing the need to accommodate a fast-growing urban population.

From a conservation perspective, THE LINE proposes a city that can accommodate up to 9 million inhabitants with a land footprint of 2% of that of cities with a similar population. This allows nature to thrive and contributes to protecting 95% of NEOM’s 26,500 km2 land area. THE LINE is also a model for a city fully powered by renewable energy and supported by sustainable water and food production.

From a human perspective, THE LINE, with its 3-dimensional organization of private and public space, provides universal and equitable access to amenities and services. It will also ensure that all residents have direct views and immediate access to nature. The city is car-free and is composed of hyper-mixed-use walkable communities providing 5-minute access to daily needs.

“The work undertaken by NEOM in the last few years will not only be important in the context of THE LINE but will also, in a pro-active and meaningful way, help to engage in the ongoing development of sustainable urban design globally,” said CEO of NEOM Nadhmi Al-Nasr.

As for Antoni Vives, Chief Urban Planning Officer of NEOM, he said that “68% of the world’s population is expected to live in urban areas by 2050. The current global urban model driven by the automobile is failing and must be revisited considering its impact on the environment and people’s wellbeing.”

“Working on THE LINE with some of the most recognized designers and research institutions has resulted in a significant body of work that re-establishes our urban realm as a space for human and cultural exchange,” Tarek Qaddumi, Executive Director of Urban Planning of NEOM, said.
The exhibition runs from May 20-September 24, at Abbazia di San Gregorio and will host speaking events, educational programs, and round tables featuring leading architects, academics, and urban thinkers from around the world.



Medieval Mummies 'Beyond Repair' after Dublin Church Fire

Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo
Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo
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Medieval Mummies 'Beyond Repair' after Dublin Church Fire

Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo
Police in Ireland. Reuters file photo

Five medieval mummies preserved in the crypt of a Dublin church have likely been damaged beyond repair by a fire and water used to douse the flames, a church official said on Wednesday.
The five sets of remains, preserved for hundreds of years in the crypt of the 11th century St. Michan's Church in central Dublin, include the remains of a crusader and are a tourist attraction in the city, Reuters reported.
An intruder broke into the crypt on Tuesday afternoon and started the fire and firefighters used water to put it out, the Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin, Michael Jackson, told RTE radio.
"The combination of fire and water have done significant damage to the mummies... I honestly don't know exactly what the extent of that is, but my fear like that of others is that the damage is irreparable," Jackson said.
The remains are due to be examined by experts from the National Museum of Ireland to see if anything can be salvaged, he said.
The vicar of the church, David Pierpoint, told RTE he thought the mummies were "beyond repair."