Louis Vuitton Braves Rain on Its Italian Island Paradise

Bad weather was likely not top of mind when the storied luxury label chose Isola Bella as the venue for its Cruise 2024 collection. GABRIEL BOUYS / AFP
Bad weather was likely not top of mind when the storied luxury label chose Isola Bella as the venue for its Cruise 2024 collection. GABRIEL BOUYS / AFP
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Louis Vuitton Braves Rain on Its Italian Island Paradise

Bad weather was likely not top of mind when the storied luxury label chose Isola Bella as the venue for its Cruise 2024 collection. GABRIEL BOUYS / AFP
Bad weather was likely not top of mind when the storied luxury label chose Isola Bella as the venue for its Cruise 2024 collection. GABRIEL BOUYS / AFP

Louis Vuitton valiantly battled pounding rain on an Italian island paradise while presenting its cruise collection Wednesday night, the weather sending celebrity guests underneath umbrellas and dampening a hairdo or two.

But when you're the flagship brand within the powerhouse LVMH portfolio, with a guest list that includes Catherine Deneuve, Cate Blanchett and Emma Stone, what's a little rain?

Bad weather was likely not top of mind when the storied luxury label led by Nicolas Ghesquiere chose the tiny Isola Bella, a jewel of an island in the azure waters of Lake Maggiore, as an appropriately jaw-dropping venue for its Cruise 2024 collection, AFP said.

But the rain arrived nonetheless, forcing the show originally planned for the island's formal terraced gardens to take place within the baroque Palazzo Borromeo, still owned by the family of the same name whose noble ancestry dates to the 13th century.

"It's the one thing Nicolas can't control, is the weather," the editor-in-chief of Vogue Thailand, Ford Laosuksri, told AFP after the show, as guests lingered to sip bubbly while hoping (in vain) for the rain to stop.

Laosuksri was wearing a crocheted floral top and sandals -- an endearing if not foolhardy gesture amid the steady rain.

"I didn't want to ruin my velvet shoes," he confided.

Ghesquiere, Louis Vuitton's artistic director since 2013, sent models through the ornate, high-ceilinged rooms of the 17th-century palazzo in eclectic, futuristic creations for which he is celebrated.

Some looks recalled scuba gear adorned with avant garde ruffling, while others felt like fencers' uniforms, protective with thick quilting over the chest.

Fabric was cinched tight like an accordion at the bodice of a sleeveless dress with color blocks in royal blue and yellow gold, imparting texture and movement, while a shiny black dress came with a drawstring neckline that called to mind a popular handbag by the brand.

Sweaters became more airy with a translucent stripe at the midriff, while three chiffon gowns cut on the bias -- in dusty pink, sea green and baby blue -- sported exaggerated puffy sleeves worthy of the Edwardian age.

"It was beautiful, it was flowy but still powerful," said Philippine actress Heart Evangelista.

From fishing to fashion

Louis Vuitton's event was the first-ever fashion show allowed on Isola Bella, a former fishing village transformed by the Borromeos into a sumptuous paradise fit for royalty.

Kings, queens and emperors have been guests at Palazzo Borromeo over the years, including Queen Victoria, Napoleon and Josephine, and even Prince Charles and Princess Diana in 1985.

On Wednesday celebrities and influencers from around the world -- including US actress Jennifer Connelly and Felix from K-Pop's Stray Kids -- descended on the island.

Trying not to slip, guests took cover under the transparent umbrellas provided by the brand before escaping into the palazzo.

Following the show, some guests stood on benches and posed for pictures under the watchful gaze of centuries of Borromeo elders whose portraits line the walls.

Cruise collections are designed to offer warm-weather wardrobes for jet-setters lucky enough to escape to sunny locales during the drab winter months. In recent years, they have become destination events, with brands choosing more and more exotic spots to backdrop their luxury looks.

Louis Vuitton's show comes on the heels of Dior's, which showed a Frida Kahlo-inspired cruise collection in Mexico City Saturday, and Chanel's earlier this month at Hollywood's Paramount Studios.



Prada Gives New Meaning to Bows and Aprons, Historic Elements of Women’s Wardrobe, for Next Season 

Models wear creations part of the Prada women's Fall-Winter 2024-25 collection presented at the Milan's Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, 22 February 2024. (EPA)
Models wear creations part of the Prada women's Fall-Winter 2024-25 collection presented at the Milan's Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, 22 February 2024. (EPA)
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Prada Gives New Meaning to Bows and Aprons, Historic Elements of Women’s Wardrobe, for Next Season 

Models wear creations part of the Prada women's Fall-Winter 2024-25 collection presented at the Milan's Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, 22 February 2024. (EPA)
Models wear creations part of the Prada women's Fall-Winter 2024-25 collection presented at the Milan's Fashion Week in Milan, Italy, 22 February 2024. (EPA)

Don’t call them nostalgic, the bows and aprons, silken slips and hats that filled the Prada runway. Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons recovered elements of a women’s wardrobe history and reconstituted them into something “modern.”

“It’s a history of women,” Prada told reporters backstage at the fall-winter 2024-25 preview show on Thursday. This act of reinventing items fished from deep inside the closet “frees them from their cage,” Prada said, giving them new meaning.

The looks are modular. Woolen aprons, facing front or back, partially obscure slip skirts, closing with bows or floral appliques — the silken touches defy the male silhouette. The skirt combos are paired with an accompanying jacket with a silken back panel, or twinsets in bold color combinations, royal red and purple, yesteryear olive and pink.

Shift dresses are covered in the front with wispy, monochrome tabs that flutter with each step. Masculine elements include skirts cuffed at the hem and Varsity letter jacket emblazoned with a “P” for wannabe athletes that never made the cut. Cocktail dresses feature big bows and a fur collar.

The color palette is mostly dark neutral, punctuated by colorful hats in aubergine or turquoise that elongate the form. In velvet they have the feeling of a Beehive, covered with feathers of a mod 1960s brushed do. The Prada Cleo bag has an oversized shoulder strap. Bags also fasten to the wrist with a leather strap.

“I always choose to work with pieces from history because for me history teaches us everything, in every field from politics to fashion to art. Anything we are comes from our past,” Prada said.

The show, she said, was meant as a gesture of “goodness,” something needed as an antidote to aggression, “especially in these times.” In that vein, models walked with their hands clutching their breasts, in a protective gesture.

“Fashion is also about love,” Simons added. “The love of beauty, the love of history.”

Emma Watson, Tracy Ellis Ross and Gwendoline Christie took front-row seats in the Prada showroom, perched above a plexiglass runway covering scattered fall leaves.


Milan Fashion Week Fires Up Catwalks despite Cautious Outlook

Milan is back in the limelight with the start of its Fashion Week, with 56 runway shows planned. GABRIEL BOUYS / AFP
Milan is back in the limelight with the start of its Fashion Week, with 56 runway shows planned. GABRIEL BOUYS / AFP
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Milan Fashion Week Fires Up Catwalks despite Cautious Outlook

Milan is back in the limelight with the start of its Fashion Week, with 56 runway shows planned. GABRIEL BOUYS / AFP
Milan is back in the limelight with the start of its Fashion Week, with 56 runway shows planned. GABRIEL BOUYS / AFP

The fashion set moves to Italy Wednesday for Milan Fashion Week, marked by a new designer at Moschino but held amid an uncertain outlook for luxury.
The women's runway shows from Fendi, Prada, Versace and Dolce & Gabbana, among many others, promise a dose of festivity and froufrou in Italy's northern fashion capital, AFP said.
Following fashion weeks in New York and London, Milan again has its moment in the limelight, with 56 runway shows through Sunday on its Fall/Winter 2024-2025 calendar.
But they come amid a backdrop of uncertainty in the global luxury fashion market.
Muted growth projections, inflation concerns, an economic slowdown in China and geopolitical risk loom large for the sector expected to expand globally by just three to five percent this year, according to McKinsey's State of Fashion report published in November.
That is below an estimated five to seven percent for 2023.
Italy's fashion sector -- which includes clothing and leather, shoes, jewelry, cosmetics and accessories -- grew four percent to nearly 103 billion euros ($110 billion) last year, according to estimates from the National Chamber for Italian Fashion.
The association's head, Carlo Capasa, said it was too early to know how 2024 will bode for the industry.
"It's a complex year, it will take resilience," Capasa told journalists earlier this month.
"We know there are three wars, European and US elections. It's a year of transition."
Glitterati gather
But frayed nerves are rarely on display in the front rows, as the glitterati gather for the jam-packed week of fashion's finest.

More than 100,000 people, including buyers, media and brand representatives, are expected for Fashion Week, a rise of 10 percent over last February, Capasa said.
High on the list for fashion watchers will be the debut collection on Thursday of Adrian Appiolaza for Moschino.
The Argentine designer, previously at Loewe, was named creative director of the irreverent, pop-influenced brand last month after his predecessor died just 10 days into the job.
Gucci veteran Davide Renne, who died in November, had been brought in after Jeremy Scott stepped down after a decade at the helm.
Founded by Franco Moschino, the label is known for playful, quirky creations often embellished with slogans -- such as "Gilt without Guilt" or "Good Taste Doesn't Exist" -- or riffing on iconic consumer brands from McDonald's to Barbie.
Debut collections are also expected from Walter Chiapponi at Blumarine -- the flirty, jeans-heavy brand previously led by Nicola Brognano -- and Matteo Tamburini at Tod's.
Chiapponi had been artistic director at Tod's since 2019, and when he left he was replaced by Tamburini, most recently head of ready-to-wear for Bottega Veneta.


Burberry Presents Star-studded Moody Autumnal Collection

A person walks past a Burberry store undergoing refurbishment on New Bond Street in London, Britain, March 11, 2023. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
A person walks past a Burberry store undergoing refurbishment on New Bond Street in London, Britain, March 11, 2023. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
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Burberry Presents Star-studded Moody Autumnal Collection

A person walks past a Burberry store undergoing refurbishment on New Bond Street in London, Britain, March 11, 2023. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
A person walks past a Burberry store undergoing refurbishment on New Bond Street in London, Britain, March 11, 2023. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

Burberry's creative director, Daniel Lee, on Monday showed his third brief at London Fashion Week, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary, with an ode to the brand's outdoor heritage for the luxury house's autumn-winter 2024 collection.
Set in a dark marquee in London's Victoria Park where guests sat on big fluffy brown cushions, songs from late British singer Amy Winehouse set the mood for the night.
The star-studded show was attended by actress Olivia Coleman, US Vogue Editor in Chief Anna Wintour, model Jourdan Dunn, and Irish actor Barry Keoghan among others, Reuters.
Monday's show heavily featured outerwear and sporty silhouettes with bomber jackets and Burberry's iconic trench coat that sat alongside flowy beaded and velvet dresses.
It noticeably lacked the brand's new signature 'Knight Blue', the same color featured in its "takeover" of British department store Harrods this month.
Models walked down a grass runway on chunky-soled leather boots, parading leather and faux-fur coats in shades of muted green and brown, oversized stripy suit jackets and trousers with sipper detailing.
British models Naomi Campbell, Agyness Deyn and Lily Cole were among those sashaying on the catwalk.
Burberry's famous beige, black and red check was reimagined into the moody Autumnal color palette and featured on the inside of floor-sweeping skirts with long slits down the side.
Accessories included checked umbrellas, large canvas, leather and faux-fur bags in cream, brown and green - often adorned with gold detailing - and paired with scarves worn over the head.
Lee, who was behind the revamp of Italian fashion brand Bottega Veneta, is facing pressure to produce a winning collection for Burberry which is battling a slowdown in demand for luxury goods.
The 168-year-old company issued a warning on its profits in January, a setback for Chief Executive Jonathan Akeroyd who is seeking to reposition the brand as "modern British luxury".


Naomi Campbell Walks for Star-studded Burberry Show at London Fashion Week

Naomi Campbell. (Getty Images)
Naomi Campbell. (Getty Images)
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Naomi Campbell Walks for Star-studded Burberry Show at London Fashion Week

Naomi Campbell. (Getty Images)
Naomi Campbell. (Getty Images)

For Londoners, rain is simply a fact of life. But for Burberry, it’s the inspiration for seemingly endless variations of luxurious outerwear, from the heritage brand’s best-selling trench coat to oversized duffels and fur-lined bombers.
The British fashion house showcased its latest designs Monday at London Fashion Week to a soulful Amy Winehouse soundtrack interspersed with a woman’s voice saying “I love London ... the smell of London when it rains.”
“Saltburn” star Barry Keoghan and “The Crown” actress Olivia Coleman were among celebrities who turned up on the VIP front row to watch the show, which drew heavily on the heritage house’s military history and its signature check print, The Associated Press said.
Models wore double-breasted coats buttoned all the way up to the neck, as if bracing against the inclement British weather. Some donned mannish, oversized coats in military greens and browns paired with matching wide-leg trousers, while others covered up with an elegant silk scarf wrapped around the head.
Some models even strutted down the catwalk clutching a collapsible umbrella – in Burberry’s trademark check, of course.
It’s no surprise that the elements feature so prominently in the show. The fashion house’s founder, Thomas Burberry, invented the fabric gabardine, a breathable material used for rainwear, in the late 1800s. The brand’s trench coat, invented around the time of World War I, boasts functional designs like storm shields as well as epaulettes and gun flaps.
It’s not all function and practicality. Flashes of cherry red tartan, used in the lining of a coat or glimpsed in a skirt hem, brightened up a muted palette dominated by khaki and earthy tones. Tough bomber jackets and bulky duffel coats were softened with furry hoods or collars and luxurious fur accessories.
Supermodel Naomi Campbell, sashaying in a shimmering bronze strapless column gown, rounded out the show.
Burberry is traditionally the glitziest event at London Fashion Week, which also features catwalk shows by designers including Erdem, JW Anderson, Roksanda Ilincic and Molly Goddard.
The London displays wrap up on Tuesday, when the fashion crowd decamps to Milan Fashion Week for more new season runway shows.

 

 


London Fashion Week Show at British Museum Irks Greece

Designer Erdem Moralioglu chose the impressive setting of the Athens Parthenon sculptures showroom at the British Museum. HENRY NICHOLLS / AFP
Designer Erdem Moralioglu chose the impressive setting of the Athens Parthenon sculptures showroom at the British Museum. HENRY NICHOLLS / AFP
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London Fashion Week Show at British Museum Irks Greece

Designer Erdem Moralioglu chose the impressive setting of the Athens Parthenon sculptures showroom at the British Museum. HENRY NICHOLLS / AFP
Designer Erdem Moralioglu chose the impressive setting of the Athens Parthenon sculptures showroom at the British Museum. HENRY NICHOLLS / AFP

The Greek Minister of Culture, Lina Mendoni, expressed her anger late on Saturday after a London Fashion week show took place in front of the Parthenon Marbles at the British Museum.
Designer Erdem Moralioglu chose the impressive setting of the Athens Parthenon sculptures showroom at the British Museum to present the autumn winter 2024 collection of his eponymous brand Erdem, inspired by Greek singer Maria Callas and her interpretation of the opera Medea in 1953, AFP said.
"By organizing a fashion show in the halls where the Parthenon Sculptures are exhibited, the British Museum, once again, proves its zero respect for the masterpieces of Pheidias," Mendoni said in a statement.
"The directors of the British Museum trivialize and insult not only the monument but also the universal values that it transmits. The conditions of display and storage of the sculptures, at the Duveen Gallery, are constantly deteriorating. It is time for the stolen and abused sculptural masterpieces to shine in the Attic light," she added.
The sculptures were taken from the Parthenon temple at the Acropolis in Greece in the early 19th century by British diplomat Thomas Bruce, the earl of Elgin.
Athens maintains the marbles, which are a major draw for visitors at London's British Museum, were stolen, while the UK claims they were obtained legally.
The 1963 British Museum Act prohibits the removal of objects from the institution's collection.
But officials at the museum, which is under pressure to repatriate other foreign antiquities, have not ruled out a possible loan deal.
Late November, a diplomatic spat raised eyebrows when Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis expressed his "displeasure" over UK counterpart Rishi Sunak's last minute cancellation of a bilateral meeting set to discuss their long-running dispute over the Parthenon Marbles.
At issue for London was the Greek leader's comments in a BBC interview a day before the meeting about ownership of the 2,500-year-old marbles.
Sunak was allegedly angry about Mitsotakis's comments that having some of the marbles in London and others in Athens was like cutting the Mona Lisa in half.


Paul Costelloe Opens 40-year-old London Fashion Week with Classic Designs

A model presents a creation at the Paul Costelloe catwalk show during London Fashion Week in London, Britain, February 16, 2024. REUTERS/Hollie Adams
A model presents a creation at the Paul Costelloe catwalk show during London Fashion Week in London, Britain, February 16, 2024. REUTERS/Hollie Adams
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Paul Costelloe Opens 40-year-old London Fashion Week with Classic Designs

A model presents a creation at the Paul Costelloe catwalk show during London Fashion Week in London, Britain, February 16, 2024. REUTERS/Hollie Adams
A model presents a creation at the Paul Costelloe catwalk show during London Fashion Week in London, Britain, February 16, 2024. REUTERS/Hollie Adams

London Fashion Week kicked off on Friday with Irish designer Paul Costelloe championing classic looks and bringing a little bit of nostalgia to the catwalk as the showcase event celebrates its 40th birthday.
The 78-year-old designer, who could not attend the show due to illness, presented a mix of whites, dark greys and plenty of tweeds in his "Once upon a Time" autumn/winter 2024 collection, described as "Where Limerick meets Downtown New York".
Models in white jackets and floaty skirts opened the show. A selection of plaid looks followed, with the color palette then turning darker for tailored tweed skirt suits, belted coats and short feminine dresses, Reuters reported.
For the evening, there were patterned frocks with puffy sleeves.
"This collection expresses my view that classic design still has its place in high fashion," Costelloe said in show notes.
"I have added a personal moment of nostalgia by adding a print based on the street where I once lived. It was a glorious moment to dream and live."
Costelloe's team also shared a note from the designer explaining his absence due to a virus and wishing London Fashion Week a "happy 40th birthday".
This year marks 40 years since the British Fashion Council (BFC) held its first London Fashion Week, which is one of the four big catwalk fixtures alongside New York, Milan and Paris and is best known for its emerging talent and avant-garde trends.
On Thursday night, several London landmarks were lit up green for the occasion and other celebrations are planned for the year.
"Of course, 40 is kind of a coming of age, a maturity and when we look back, I think we reflect on the incredible creativity that has come through London, and London Fashion Week as a platform," BFC Chief Executive Caroline Rush told Reuters.
"It continues to be about youth culture, subcultures, creativity, innovation and really leading where the rest of the fashion industry will no doubt follow."
Costelloe's show was one of more than 40 catwalk presentations this London Fashion Week, which runs until February 20, with the likes of Burberry, Bora Aksu and Mark Fast also on the calendar.


Thom Browne Closes Out NY Fashion Week with a Black-And-White Flourish and a Nod to Edgar Allan Poe 

Models walk the runway during the Thom Browne Fall 2024 fashion show at New York Fashion Week, February 14, 2024 in New York City. (AFP)
Models walk the runway during the Thom Browne Fall 2024 fashion show at New York Fashion Week, February 14, 2024 in New York City. (AFP)
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Thom Browne Closes Out NY Fashion Week with a Black-And-White Flourish and a Nod to Edgar Allan Poe 

Models walk the runway during the Thom Browne Fall 2024 fashion show at New York Fashion Week, February 14, 2024 in New York City. (AFP)
Models walk the runway during the Thom Browne Fall 2024 fashion show at New York Fashion Week, February 14, 2024 in New York City. (AFP)

Thom Browne, ever the master showman of American fashion, closed out New York Fashion Week on a blustery day with his own wintry landscape, blanketing the floor with fake snow and presenting his latest inventive designs to the words of Edgar Allan Poe’s chilling “The Raven.”

With celebrities like Janet Jackson and Queen Latifah in the front row Wednesday evening at a theater space on the far west side of Manhattan, Browne did what he does best, displaying feats of intricate tailoring and taking his time to weave a tale. His soundtrack narrator was Carrie Coon, star of “The Gilded Age,” who recited Poe’s bleak story of a lover mourning his lost love, Lenore, when he is visited by the black, thick-necked bird who constantly repeats, “Nevermore! Nevermore!”

Nobody in fashion is a better storyteller than Browne, now chairman of the Council of Fashion Designers of America, who over the years has placed his shows in mock cathedrals, magical gardens, even on faraway planets. As always, Browne’s models did not strut a runway but instead were players in his fantasy, walking deliberately and serenely around a wintry wasteland filled with snow and bare trees.

As the audience filed in, one of those “trees,” a man on stilts in a huge puffer coat, or gown, stood silently. Once the drama began, four young children emerged from that coat — as if he were a darker version of Mother Ginger from “The Nutcracker” — eventually sitting in the snow as the poem began.

“While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,” Poe’s words went, “as of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.” The procession began. Of nearly 50 looks, everything was in black-and-white — typical of Browne’s color discipline — with a little gold at the end.

The Poe theme was everpresent. In the first look, an imposing black headpiece made it seem like a raven was perched on the model’s head. In the second, black birds emblazoned a white coat that itself covered a black jacket and skirt.

It was a hugely inventive array of coats and jackets and skirts and trousers — and sometimes no trousers at all. There were solids and checks and prints. Some ensembles were fully formed and others had a deconstructed feel that is a longtime design theme of Browne’s. Each ensemble was a work of layered and intricate tailoring, the hallmark of a designer who recently was invited to show haute couture in Paris.

Some silhouettes were long and sleek, others boxy or cinched tightly at the waist. Bags included a number of variations of the Hector — a dog-shaped bag in honor of Browne’s pet of the same name. The bags were covered, said the label, by a removable layer of waterproof vinyl, also used on the shoes.

For whimsy, the word “Nevermore” from the poem was emblazoned on the backs of a few jackets. And there was a rare hint of skin for the label — a sheer black blouse covered with roses and a sheer skirt. As for the hair, it was hair-raising — literally. Many models wore two braids that defied gravity, reaching upward toward the sky.

“The Raven” hardly ends on a cheery note. Indeed, Coon ended it with frightening screams of “Nevermore!” But for Browne and his audience it was Valentine’s Day. And so, as he’s done before, Browne turned his post-show bow into a romantic gesture, carrying a huge red heart-shaped box, presumably of chocolates.

The crowd seemed to launch into a collective “Aww.” Then, as people prepared to file out into the freezing night, many first stopped to tromp on the fake snow and greet the tall human tree — who obliged by shaking his branches.


Michael Kors Inspired by Grandmother’s Wedding Gown for Fall-Winter Collection at NY Fashion Week

 A model presents a creation from the Michael Kors Fall/Winter 2024 collection during New York Fashion Week, in New York City, US, February 13, 2024. (Reuters)
A model presents a creation from the Michael Kors Fall/Winter 2024 collection during New York Fashion Week, in New York City, US, February 13, 2024. (Reuters)
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Michael Kors Inspired by Grandmother’s Wedding Gown for Fall-Winter Collection at NY Fashion Week

 A model presents a creation from the Michael Kors Fall/Winter 2024 collection during New York Fashion Week, in New York City, US, February 13, 2024. (Reuters)
A model presents a creation from the Michael Kors Fall/Winter 2024 collection during New York Fashion Week, in New York City, US, February 13, 2024. (Reuters)

The original location of the legendary Barney’s Department store in the Chelsea section of Manhattan set the stage for designer Michael Kors to present his Fall-Winter 2024 collection at New York Fashion Week.

Inside the mirrored lobby, the celebrity-rich crowd included actors Blake Lively, Katie Holmes, Rachel Zegler, Brie Larson, Gabrielle Union, and many others. Vogue Editor-in-Chief Anna Wintour was also in attendance, as well as recording artist Kelsea Ballerini.

Before the show, Kors explained his mission for this collection during an interview with The Associated Press.

“When the world is upside down, I think my job is to make people feel more confident. It’s that simple,” Kors said.

His mother, Joan Kors, who died last year, had a strong influence in his life and career. And while her legacy remains with the designer, this time it was his grandmother who inspired him.

“I found my grandmother’s wedding gown and she got married in the 30s, and I started delving into the 30s because her dress looked so incredibly modern,” Kors said.

From there, he thought about old Hollywood.

“We saw the two sides of women’s personalities, we saw things that were very sensual and we saw Carole Lombard and Jean Harlow, and then we saw the great classic tomboys like (Marlene) Dietrich and Katharine Hepburn and the connective thread that all of that kept going,” Kors said.

The idea of creating the collection based on those elements and ideas impressed Rachel Brosnahan.

“I feel like any time you can inspire your art, whether it’s fashion or acting or music with any kind of emotion, it just makes that iconic and timeless and stand out. So I’m excited and I didn’t know that,” Brosnahan said.

The Emmy-winning star of “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” leaves town next week to take on the role of Lois Lane in “Superman: Legacy.”

“I guess the cat’s out of the bag. We’re doing our first table read next week in Atlanta,” Brosnahan said.

Once the runway show began, the crowd was treated to an assortment of tweed jackets, double-breasted coats, slit skirts, and sequined dresses. There were cashmere turtleneck sweaters, thick eyewear, and slender bags. With a few exceptions, the majority of designs employed a neutral color palette, with some gray, and lots of black.

“Black is definitely part of the collection. But there’s also the shock of wearing head-to-toe white in the winter. But then there are some warm tones of cappuccino and chocolate, lots of metallics, gunmetal, which I love,” Kors said.

Outside of the color scheme, Kors strives to create form fitting, sensual designs with roomy comfort.

“It is never just about wearing something skintight because for me it’s comfort for everything. But it’s definitely about showing the body too. That’s why today you will see models of every age and every size, which makes it interesting for me,” Kors said.

He added: “When they get dressed, they put something on, and it makes them feel ready to greet the day and feel their best self.”


Tory Burch Wants to Make 'Everyday Sublime' at New York Fashion Week

Carolina Herrera's collection combined classic looks with bolder and more colorful options. Charly TRIBALLEAU / AFP
Carolina Herrera's collection combined classic looks with bolder and more colorful options. Charly TRIBALLEAU / AFP
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Tory Burch Wants to Make 'Everyday Sublime' at New York Fashion Week

Carolina Herrera's collection combined classic looks with bolder and more colorful options. Charly TRIBALLEAU / AFP
Carolina Herrera's collection combined classic looks with bolder and more colorful options. Charly TRIBALLEAU / AFP

Striding down the runway to music from The Cure and Joy Division on Monday, models at New York Fashion Week paraded skirts inspired by lampshades -- US designer Tory Burch's celebration of making "the everyday sublime".
The brightly colored and sometimes shiny skirts seemed to stand alone at the waist and were designed to fold up "almost like origami," the designer told AFP.
"I wanted sharp corners, but... the skirt actually comes off and it folds up into nothing, is almost like origami," she said, celebrating the 20th anniversary of her brand.
Among the most singular works in her Fall/Winter 2024 collection, the skirts were worn with lightweight tops featuring long sleeves and hoods, during a runway show under the arcades of Manhattan's Great Library.
"I've tried to think about how to make the everyday sublime," she said.
Burch's brand has long been lauded for its classic looks but it now seems to be evolving toward becoming more contemporary.
She uses very light materials but gives them character with raw-cut seams, adds multi-colored fringes to a long sequined coat, or makes a delicate ruffled dress protrude from a pleated jacket.
"I think it's about a woman who has confidence and is looking for optimism in the world," she said.
Seeking balance
True to the image of the Carolina Herrera brand founded in 1981, its new autumn-winter collection is characterized by precise, streamlined silhouettes, enhanced by ruffles on sleeves and skirts, as well as embroidery.
The fashion house's classics are all there, including pencil or ruffled skirts and black-and-white checked suits.

Wes Gordon, the house's artistic director, has really made his mark on colors, however.
He has taken the brand away from basics such as black, white and brown to combine blocks of red or navy blue with blacks, pinks, yellows and even florals.
All of this was designed to dress a woman who is "not shy, who is powerful, who was confident and loves clothes," he told AFP.
Gordon said he sought a balance between the "drama" of the colors and color-blocking against the "precision and the discipline about the cut."


Tommy Hilfiger Takes over the Oyster Bar in Grand Central for Joyous New York-Centric Fashion Show

 The Tommy Hilfiger collection is modeled during Fashion Week, Friday, Feb. 9, 2024, in New York. (AP)
The Tommy Hilfiger collection is modeled during Fashion Week, Friday, Feb. 9, 2024, in New York. (AP)
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Tommy Hilfiger Takes over the Oyster Bar in Grand Central for Joyous New York-Centric Fashion Show

 The Tommy Hilfiger collection is modeled during Fashion Week, Friday, Feb. 9, 2024, in New York. (AP)
The Tommy Hilfiger collection is modeled during Fashion Week, Friday, Feb. 9, 2024, in New York. (AP)

Tommy Hilfiger threw himself a welcome home party Friday night at Grand Central's Oyster Bar with Questlove as his DJ and Jon Batiste serenading Anna Wintour on his melodica while a bevy of global celebrities looked on.

Turning the iconic restaurant into “The Tommy” club for a night, Hilfiger called his New York Fashion Week show “A New York Moment,” rolling out roomy, '90s prep classics for the bash. The last time he hit town for fashion week was in September 2022, when his crowd braved rain for his “Tommy Factory” show at a Brooklyn drive-in theater.

This time, happy and dry underground beneath the transportation hub's vaulted ceilings, fans lined ramps for a glimpse of K-pop's Nayeon, her countryman Junho Lee, Indian actor Sonam Kapoor and various other friends of the brand: Sofia Richie Grainge and Damson Idris among them. Sylvester Stallone popped in at the end.

Hilfiger stuck to what he knows on models walking through: rugby shirts, blazers, chinos and varsity jackets in corduroy and herringbone. There were tailored women's coats in wool, checks and earth-toned tweeds, and chunky cable knits and mini-dress polos in cashmere.

Hilfiger put some of his famous guests in pieces that were shoppable as he continued to embrace a “see now, buy now” approach to fashion shows.

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During a preview Thursday at his Madison Avenue offices, Hilfiger ticked off his primary markets of today: Germany, France, Italy, England, Türkiye, various parts of Scandinavia and Greece among them.

“That business is now bigger than the US business,” he told The Associated Press. “We're going to bring it back in the states now because we have really focused a lot on international growth. And this is a statement we’re making, that we’re coming home, and we’re taking it very seriously.”

And who had the most fun during his New York return? Hilfiger himself. He posed with Stallone and others for photos after his finale, when Batiste played along to his hit “Freedom” as he walked through the crowd. The designer even briefly joined Questlove in his booth.

On the runway, Hilfiger kept his logo messaging to a minimum as he attempts to “grasp,” as he called it, US consumers once again.

“We have to do it in a different way. We have to give them more elevated product, more modern fabrics and fits, and avoid redundancy,” he said. “We’ve got a very big polo shirt business, chino pant business, Oxford shirt business. But the consumer wants more than just that. Those are his or her staples. We're now going to bring some more excitement. And some more sophistication.”

Hilfiger started his eponymous brand in New York in 1985. PVH acquired it in 2010. Global retail sales of the brand’s wide range of products totaled about $9.1 billion in 2022.