Mythical Chic: Jonathan Anderson’s Loewe Menswear Spells Magic in Paris

A model presents a creation for the Spring/Summer 2025 Menswear Collection by British designer Jonathan Anderson for Loewe fashion house during the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris, France, 22 June 2024. (EPA)
A model presents a creation for the Spring/Summer 2025 Menswear Collection by British designer Jonathan Anderson for Loewe fashion house during the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris, France, 22 June 2024. (EPA)
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Mythical Chic: Jonathan Anderson’s Loewe Menswear Spells Magic in Paris

A model presents a creation for the Spring/Summer 2025 Menswear Collection by British designer Jonathan Anderson for Loewe fashion house during the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris, France, 22 June 2024. (EPA)
A model presents a creation for the Spring/Summer 2025 Menswear Collection by British designer Jonathan Anderson for Loewe fashion house during the Paris Fashion Week, in Paris, France, 22 June 2024. (EPA)

Golden feathers cascaded down models' concealed faces Saturday, which opened Loewe and evoked the myths, setting the stage for Northern Irish designer Jonathan Anderson’s more refined and subdued collection this season. This was a quintessential Anderson move, blending whimsical artistry with high fashion.

Here are some highlights of spring 2025 menswear shows:

Feathers and suits at Loewe

Moments of poetry abounded, as usual. A stiff sleeveless pearl vest and another resembling armor, almost sculptural in its presence, shimmered like iridescent fish. Anderson’s talent for what he calls creating “collaged realness” was once again on display for spring, merging art content with high-end fashion.

Generous draping and ruching on pants and foulards showcased fine fashion design with curves swirling elegantly, all conceived with a light, minimalist touch. This was Anderson at his best, creating exaggerated, sculptural silhouettes that are now a hallmark of his Loewe tenure. The deceptive lightness and fluidity of the cottons, wools and leathers marked his ongoing exploration of materiality.

The tailored suit and pants — a mainstay of an office job — were touchstones, starkly contrasting the moments of whimsy.

Even here, styles were treated with Anderson’s signature off-kilter eye and in loose, generous proportions.

Elongated belts were in double vision, while patent Oxford shoes would have been ready for Wall Street, were it not for the fairytale-like surreally long toe that could have been worn by Rumpelstiltskin. Was Anderson trying to evoke a daydream of a bored city worker? This fusion of the mundane and the fantastical is an Anderson trademark. Spring was another example of his ability to use clothing as a medium to explore broader cultural themes.

Pastels, microbacteria: Kiko Kostadinov

Asian cross-over styles and sumptuous turban-like headwear mixed with the buttons and epaulet detailing of military garb created a distinctively avant-garde atmosphere for fashion-forward designer Kiko Kostadinov’s latest collection. The nuanced incorporation of pastels, often gently color-blocked into the outfits, lent the collection a vibrant yet subtle harmony, reflecting Kostadinov’s knack for blending unlikely elements.

The uncommon pastel hues made this collection sing. Kostadinov often uses vibrant tones to create eye-catching ensembles.

Other styles featured high, round collars that seemed to evoke Star Trek, adding a futuristic twist. Kostadinov has a penchant for integrating elements of science fiction and fantasy into his designs, as seen in past collections inspired by cinematic and bookish themes.

Indeed, one look — a striking industrial-style jacket and pants — sported surreal motifs of alien lifeforms or underwater creatures. This playful yet eerie detailing continued, resembling microscopic bacteria adorning a 70s-style pastel-striped shirt and pants.



LVMH Shares Drop after Missing Second-quarter Estimates

A man walks past a shop of fashion house Dior in Paris, France, April 15, 2024. REUTERS/Manon Cruz/File Photo Purchase Licensing Rights
A man walks past a shop of fashion house Dior in Paris, France, April 15, 2024. REUTERS/Manon Cruz/File Photo Purchase Licensing Rights
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LVMH Shares Drop after Missing Second-quarter Estimates

A man walks past a shop of fashion house Dior in Paris, France, April 15, 2024. REUTERS/Manon Cruz/File Photo Purchase Licensing Rights
A man walks past a shop of fashion house Dior in Paris, France, April 15, 2024. REUTERS/Manon Cruz/File Photo Purchase Licensing Rights

Shares in LVMH (LVMH.PA) fell as much as 6.5% in early Wednesday trade and were on track for their biggest one-day drop since October 2023 after second-quarter sales growth at the French luxury goods giant missed analysts' consensus estimate.

The world's biggest luxury group said late Tuesday its quarterly sales rose 1% year on year to 20.98 billion euros ($22.76 billion), undershooting the 21.6 billion expected on average by analysts polled by LSEG.

At 1000 GMT, LVMH's shares were down 4.5%.

The earnings miss weighed on other luxury stocks, with Hermes (HRMS.PA), down around 2% and Kering (PRTP.PA), off 3%.

Kering is scheduled to report second-quarter sales after the market close and Hermes reports on Thursday, Reuters reported.

Jittery investors are looking for evidence that the industry will pick up from a recent slowdown, as inflation-hit shoppers hold off from splashing out on designer fashion.

JPMorgan analyst Chiara Battistini cut full year profit forecasts by 2-3% for the group, citing softer trends at LVMH's fashion and leather goods division, home to Louis Vuitton and Dior.

"The soft print is likely to add to ongoing investors’ concerns on the sector more broadly in our view, confirming that even best-in-class players like LVMH cannot be immune from the challenging backdrop," said Battistini in a note to clients.

The weakness of the yen, which has prompted a flood of Chinese shoppers to Japan seeking bargains on luxury goods, added pressure to margins, another source of concern.

Equita cut 2024 sales estimates for LVMH by 3% - attributing 1% to currency fluctuations - and lowered its second half organic sales estimate to 7% growth from 10% growth previously.

The lack of visibility for the second half beyond the easing of comparative figures - as the Chinese post-pandemic lockdown bounce tapered off a year ago - is unlikely to improve investor sentiment to the luxury sector, Citi analyst Thomas Chauvet said in an email to clients.

"No miracle with the luxury bellwether; sector likely to remain out of favour," he wrote.

Jefferies analysts said the miss came as investors eye Chinese shoppers for their potential to "resume their pre-COVID role as the locomotive of industry growth and debate when Western consumers will have fully digested their COVID overspend".

LVMH shares have been volatile since the luxury slowdown emerged, and are down about 20% over the past year, with middle-class shoppers in China, the world's No. 2 economy, a key focus as they rein in purchases at home amid a property slump and job insecurity.

LVMH offered some reassurance, with finance chief Jean-Jacques Guiony telling analysts during a call on Tuesday that Chinese customers were "holding up quite well," while business with US and European customers was "slightly better".