Ghweil Says Tripoli is beyond Haftar’s Reach

National Salvation Government Prime Minister Khalifa al-Ghweil , Asharq Al-Awast
National Salvation Government Prime Minister Khalifa al-Ghweil , Asharq Al-Awast
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Ghweil Says Tripoli is beyond Haftar’s Reach

National Salvation Government Prime Minister Khalifa al-Ghweil , Asharq Al-Awast
National Salvation Government Prime Minister Khalifa al-Ghweil , Asharq Al-Awast

Libya’s outgoing National Salvation Government Prime Minister Khalifa al-Ghweil told Asharq Al-Awsat on Friday that Libyan National Army (LNA) leader Khalifa Haftar will not be able to break into Tripoli.

Ghweil said that eastern-based Field Marshal Haftar virtually has no army to enact his vision on taking over the capital.

Ghweil, a self-declared prime minister with no international acceptance, derided the UN-sponsored Tunisia negotiations to settle the Libya crisis.

“Negotiations being held in Tunisia to amend the Skhirat agreement is absolute mockery,” said Ghweil.

The aim of these negotiations is to kickstart the implementation of a recently announced action plan by the new UN Special Representative for Libya, Ghassan Salame, aimed at helping Libyans end their deeply polarized political and military conflict.

The 54-year-old politician said the government he leads is not going anywhere and that it will stand against the internationally-led government headed by Fayez al-Sarraj.

“His government arrived aboard an Italian frigate,” he criticized.

“We do not recognize what is dubbed as a Presidential Council by the United Nations, because it goes against the outcomes of the democratic national dialogue, which is backed by the people—all of which is founded in our constitutional and legal awareness,” said Ghweil while renouncing any body linked to the Sarraj government.

“Our government has not left the political scene… the government of national salvation is on the ground, and the only legitimate cabinet in accordance with the constitutional declaration as being sworn in before the elected legislative authority with the integrity and transparency of the people, the General National Congress,” said Ghweil in defense of his administration.

“My government does not rely on or support any militia, but it has regular military forces under its chief of staff and defense ministry, as well as the National Guard, which was established in accordance with the military legislation in force,” Ghweil explained.

Responding to whether he would support the establishment of a military junta led by Haftar, he said: "I do not support that. I advocate state's rule, the peaceful transfer of power, the rejection of the militarization of the state and the subordination of the military establishment to civilian political leadership."

“Haftar cannot secure his base at the moment-- he has no strength and no army ... but rather is supported by foreign forces, which cover him from the airspace as well,” added Ghweil.

“It (foreign interference) destroys Libya and kills its people, and cannot enter Tripoli”.

“Militias are sabotaging Tripoli and holding its citizens captive, but the National Salvation Government seeks to protect statehood and citizens through dismantling these militia formations and integrating them into military institutions and police,” Ghweil said.

He further explained that former Libyans who joined militias will be drafted into state-run institutions individually and not as groups, in a move that is said to back national interest and requirements of defense and security.

Ghweil said the presence of the Sarraj administration in Tripoli resembles more a ghost than a true governance system.

“The people who came to Tripoli made the situation worse. They do not control anything. They are people driven by militias according to their opinions. Public services were cut off,” Ghweil added.
 
When asked about the opposition facing Haftar, Ghweil said that it isn’t Misrata alone going against the field marshal, but most Libyan cities.



Hamdok Optimistic for Burhan-Hemedti Meeting

Abdullah Hamdok, Sudan’s former Prime Minister and leader of the Sudanese Coordination of Civil Democratic Forces (Taqaddum)
Abdullah Hamdok, Sudan’s former Prime Minister and leader of the Sudanese Coordination of Civil Democratic Forces (Taqaddum)
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Hamdok Optimistic for Burhan-Hemedti Meeting

Abdullah Hamdok, Sudan’s former Prime Minister and leader of the Sudanese Coordination of Civil Democratic Forces (Taqaddum)
Abdullah Hamdok, Sudan’s former Prime Minister and leader of the Sudanese Coordination of Civil Democratic Forces (Taqaddum)

Abdalla Hamdok, Sudan’s former Prime Minister and leader of the Sudanese Coordination of Civil Democratic Forces (Taqaddum), is optimistic about a potential meeting between Sudan’s army leader, Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, and Rapid Support Forces (RSF) commander Gen. Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo “Hemedti.”
Speaking to Asharq Al-Awsat on the sidelines of a Cairo conference for Sudanese political forces, Hamdok said: “A meeting between the two sides is possible through the African Union’s Presidential Committee led by Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni.”
Hamdok highlighted that this committee “is a positive step, providing a mechanism to bring the conflicting parties together, which didn’t exist before.”
In late June, the African Peace and Security Council formed a committee led by Museveni to bring together Sudan’s military and RSF leaders promptly. They proposed an urgent African Union summit to address Sudan’s situation.
Hamdok called it a historic step, noting it’s the first mechanism at the presidential level. He hoped the committee could influence both sides and achieve peace.
He praised the recent African Peace and Security Council meeting for showing Africa’s concern for Sudan.
At the Cairo conference for Sudanese political forces, Hamdok highlighted it as a crucial gathering since the crisis began, focusing on ceasefire strategies and a sustainable political resolution.
He emphasized there’s no military solution to Sudan’s conflict and advocated for political negotiations.
The Cairo conference united Sudanese political and civilian forces under the theme “Together for Peace,” addressing ceasefire, humanitarian aid, and a political roadmap.
Hamdok pointed out that Sudan is undergoing the world’s biggest humanitarian crisis, with 25 million people inside Sudan facing famine.
“Starvation is claiming more lives than bullets,” said Hamdok, highlighting the urgent need to reach war-affected populations.
The former premier urged action to deliver aid across Sudan’s borders and ensure it reaches those in conflict zones.